Posts Tagged ‘servers’

 

How Cloud Computing has Transformed my Data Center!

Wednesday, July 27th, 2011 by

Like many of you, I’m a huge fan of cloud computing. I’ve been lucky enough to see first-hand how the cloud has enabled thousands of companies worldwide get started without having to spend large amounts of CapEx or commit to long term OpEx contracts just to realize an idea or launch a product without any notion of whether it will be a bust or the next big thing.

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I started working at GoGrid’s originating company ServePath in 2005 where our main product lines were dedicated servers and collocation services. ServePath was a pioneer in dedicated managed servers at a time when private networks and load balancing on shared network infrastructure were not yet productized.

John Keagy, GoGrid’s Founder & CEO (now Executive Chairman), was always pushing the boundaries within the four walls of our data center with his motto, “complex infrastructure made easy.” It was with this vision that GoGrid was developed and became a very successful provider of Infrastructure as a Service. However it’s also because of that same vision the GoGrid Ops team has spent countless hours at a whiteboard figuring out how to support “complex infrastructure made easy”.

In the six-plus years of building out our data centers and revamping them to support the constant growth of our cloud computing platform, one thing has stayed constant: power density continues to increase. When we first filled up our flagship San Francisco facility, we had power capacity to spare. As the growth of our dedicated server service became even more compelling over collocation, we started seeing an uptick in our power utilization per rack; power density was increasing from 2-3 kilowatts per rack up to 4-5 kilowatts per rack – that is when we first realized that power could become our limiting factor in our data center if this trend continued. In 2007 when GoGrid was being developed, we were asked to build out the infrastructure to support 7 – 10 kilowatts per rack, a 250% – 500% increase in power density per rack! At 2-3 kilowatts per rack, imagine you’re sitting in a small office with a space heater and you turn it on full blast, it can get a bit warm, however you can stay in the room and continue to work. When we were tasked to build racks at 7- 10 kilowatts, it was like adding 25 space heaters in the same size room; unless you make some changes to your cooling system and redesign your rack layout, you are going to feel the heat real fast. As you can imagine, not only did this create a challenge in regards to supporting that much power, cooling that much power became quite a challenge as well. But we have overcome these challenges and continue to grow.

You may be wondering how much is GoGrid’s power bill with that type of power density, and whether it is even economically scalable. Without breaking out the spreadsheets, I can assure you that one of the many benefits of cloud computing is power saving. You see, in the past, 20 servers could be supported by a dedicated server rack drawing 2 – 3 kilowatts of power, but now we can support over 2,000 virtual (multi-tenant) servers with the same rack drawing 7-10- kilowatts of power! Feel free to call me a bit of a geek, but it’s that type of efficiency that excites me to work at one of the world’s leading infrastructure as service companies.

There have been and will continue to be many challenges that the Ops Team will face as we transform our datacenters to support GoGrid’s cloud infrastructure, stories that I will be happy to share both the challenges and the benefits in future postings. For now, I hope I have given you a bit of insight into GoGrid and the power benefits that come with cloud computing.

Image “End of Life” Notification for 2 Specific CentOS & RHEL GoGrid Images

Friday, January 22nd, 2010 by

In an effort to be as proactive as possible, GoGrid has officially notified select customers of the removal (End of Life – EoL) of two specific GoGrid images. The users that were notified are ones that are actively using the images. On 2/9/10, GoGrid will be removing the following images from the GoGrid image repository:

  • CentOS – CentOS 5.1 (64-bit) w/ Apache 2.2
  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux – RHEL 5.1 (64-bit) w/ Apache 2.2

I’m sure that some of you will have questions about this. In anticipation of this, I have compiled some quick Q&A’s:

Question: What does the removal of these images mean?

Answer: Simply that after the removal date, they will no longer appear within the GoGrid Image Selection widget.

Question: I have server(s) deployed that use these images? Will they continue to function?

Answer: Yes, there is no change to how your server(s) will function if they are using one of these EoL-ed images. Just be sure that you keep everything current within those servers.

(more…) «Image “End of Life” Notification for 2 Specific CentOS & RHEL GoGrid Images»

Why Clouds Create Community

Monday, June 16th, 2008 by

cloud Clouds are sexy right now. In this article, I tracked how “Cloud Computing” is becoming a hot, up and coming Google Search term. But why is it that there are so many new user communities that are conglomerating around “the cloud” versus other more traditional hosting concepts. I would say because of the social environment where this technology is emerging.

Asking the Question

Where does one learn about technology trends? How does one test it out or know if it is a match for your offering?

Where do you learn about Technology trends?

View Results

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Traditional Hosting in the 90′s

The early 90′s were marked with the presence of AOL being the primary way that users got on the World Wide Web (now just called the Internet because people are using far more than just HTTP for content delivery). AOL Aol_cd_00001115brought a new sense of community and an easy way to “get online.” As AOL tried to continue its monolithic domination of online access, other companies started popping up offering alternatives to advertising-heavy AOL within metropolitan markets. Companies like Netcom, CompuServe and AT&T became notable AOL dial-up competitors.

(more…) «Why Clouds Create Community»

Facebook Application Hosting Comparison Matrix (Updated 2)

Monday, May 5th, 2008 by

8.27.08 – Note: Facebook and MySpace-enabled servers are currently unavailable on GoGrid. However, we have added other server images since the writing of this article. The table below has been slightly modified to reflect some changes. For a comparison of GoGrid to Amazon’s EC2, please see this page.

With the Facebook QuickStart Servers available now on GoGrid, we have received questions as to how the GoGrid service compares with others in the cloud computing and Facebook space. While this is not the “end-all” comparison, it does provide a point of reference between GoGrid, Amazon EC2 and Joyent.

Chart updated on 8/27/08.

GoGrid Amazon (EC2) Joyent
Windows Support YES NO NO
Linux Support YES YES NO
OpenSolaris Support NO NO YES
Graphical User Interface (GUI) YES NO NO
CPU 1 Xeon Core 1 Virtual Core 1/32 Xeon Core
RAM 1 GB 1.7 GB 512 MB
Storage Allotments (GB) 60 160 10
Full Root access YES YES YES
Load Balancing FREE $72/month NO
24×7 Support FREE $500/month NO
Price $72/month* $72/month FREE
Inbound data transfer (GB) FREE $0.10 500 recipients/hr
Outbound data transfer (GB) $0.25* $0.17 500 recipients/hr

*Pricing based on GoGrid Advanced Cloud and Transfer 200 GB plans

With GoGrid there are other choices as well for RAM and Storage allotments (1GB RAM servers have 60 GB disks and 2 GB RAM servers have 125GB disks). Key differentiators are the FREE support and Load Balancing offered by GoGrid as well as support for both Windows and Linux servers (Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4 and CentOS 4.4.) More OS images are added on a regular basis so check back regularly.

(more…) «Facebook Application Hosting Comparison Matrix (Updated 2)»

GoGrid exhibiting at Web 2.0 Expo in San Francisco

Monday, April 21st, 2008 by

web2-0_logo With the bubble-wrap just coming off of the public beta of GoGrid, we were able to get a last-minute booth at the upcoming Web2.0 Expo in San Francisco. Those of you going to the Web 2.0 Expo are encouraged to come by our table located in the Long Tail Pavilion (table 22). (If you are heading to get food, we are right on your way to get there.)

At our table, we will be doing product demonstrations of GoGrid, answering questions, and giving away $$$ towards a GoGrid account. Come loaded with your questions and ideas on how you can use GoGrid to better your business. Also learn about the new GoGrid QuickStart Facebook Servers that are now a hot template within your GoGrid server deployment UI.

Web 2.0 Expo runs from April 22 through April 25 at Moscone West located at 747 Howard Street in San Francisco. The Exhibit Hall is open: Weds 10:30am – 4:00pm, Thursday 10:30am – 6:00pm and Friday 10:30am – 3:00pm.

If you…

  • …have ever wondered how to get your application on the Facebook network quickly…
  • …need to rapidly scale a server environment…
  • …want a sandbox, QA or demo environment that you can turn on and off at will…
  • …are tired of paying for dedicated or shared hosting…
  • …want to deploy real Windows servers in minutes…
  • …are a LAMP or Ruby-on-Rails or Linux developer and a looking for a hosting provider…
  • …want to experience an extremely slick and elegant web-based UI used for deploying and load balancing servers…

…then you should definitely come by our table and/or give GoGrid a try! (more…) «GoGrid exhibiting at Web 2.0 Expo in San Francisco»