Posts Tagged ‘ServePath’

 

Remember, Amazon’s S3 is still a “Beta”

Sunday, February 17th, 2008 by

Amazon Web ServicesI guess I could have jumped on the bandwagon and started criticizing Amazon for the issues that it had on Friday with their S3 offering. But part of me wanted to see how it all shook out, what the cause was, what would change, if anything, and how their customers would take it. According to the blogosphere, the Amazon service was down for over 2 hours (which seems to be accurate after reading through this forum thread on the Amazon developer forum).

This official Amazon AWS response clip from the forum seems to explain the outage:

Early this morning, at 3:30am PST, we started seeing elevated levels of authenticated requests from multiple users in one of our locations. While we carefully monitor our overall request volumes and these remained within normal ranges, we had not been monitoring the proportion of authenticated requests. Importantly, these cryptographic requests consume more resources per call than other request types.

Shortly before 4:00am PST, we began to see several other users significantly increase their volume of authenticated calls. The last of these pushed the authentication service over its maximum capacity before we could complete putting new capacity in place. In addition to processing authenticated requests, the authentication service also performs account validation on every request Amazon S3 handles. This caused Amazon S3 to be unable to process any requests in that location, beginning at 4:31am PST. By 6:48am PST, we had moved enough capacity online to resolve the issue.

As we said earlier today, though we’re proud of our uptime track record over the past two years with this service, any amount of downtime is unacceptable. As part of the post mortem for this event, we have identified a set of short-term actions as well as longer term improvements. We are taking immediate action on the following: (a) improving our monitoring of the proportion of authenticated requests; (b) further increasing our authentication service capacity; and (c) adding additional defensive measures around the authenticated calls. Additionally, we’ve begun work on a service health dashboard, and expect to release that shortly.

Sincerely,
The Amazon Web Services Team

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Understanding “Clouded” Computing Terms (revised)

Tuesday, February 5th, 2008 by

Author’s Note: This post was revised on 6/23/08. The nature of computing is under going a revolution and rather than fully remove this post, I elected to refresh it so as to provide a better framework for readers.

There seems to be a lot of debate around different types of Computing Terms being used to describe server and hosting solutions. In fact, in the past, the blogosphere seemed to throw around terms like Grid, Cloud, Utility, Distributed and Cluster computing almost interchangeably. But, as of this revision, one term is rising to the top: Cloud Computing. (See recent trend analysis here.)

The definitions vary from source to source, author to author. While I cannot (and will not) attempt to articulate the end-all definition, I can write about how I view these terms and how they apply to the products that we offer, namely GoGrid. But before I dive into MY interpretation, providing what others view on these subjects may shed some light on our framework.

Terms as defined by Wikipedia

wikipedia_logo_sm Many people view Wikipedia as an authoritative source of information but that is always subject to debate. Wikipedia defines some of these terms as follows (not the end-all definitions though) and I have taken some liberties of removing non-relevant information for argument’s sake:

  • Grid Computinghttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grid_computing
    • Multiple independent computing clusters which act like a “grid” because they are composed of resource nodes not located within a single administrative domain. (formal)
    • Offering online computation or storage as a metered commercial service, known as utility computing, computing on demand, or cloud computing.
    • The creation of a “virtual supercomputer” by using spare computing resources within an organization.

    (more…) «Understanding “Clouded” Computing Terms (revised)»

TechCrunch: “Twitter and Joyent Split Amidst Downtime Travails”

Friday, February 1st, 2008 by

Sometimes it is really difficult being a Hosting Provider.

As Mark Hendrickson points out in this recent article in TechCrunch, Twitter has stopped hosting with Joyent. After “frequent outage problems that have plagued Twitter,” it seems that Twitter has elected to host somewhere else. While I’m not sure if that is a result of issues at Joyent, Hosting always seems to be the “scapegoat” in situations like these.

twitter As the TechCrunch article states, “both companies were showing strong support for each other on their respective blogs,” which I feel is rare in this age where people jump ship at the smallest issue. But the two companies still seem to be committed to each other, even if in a lesser degree:

“Both wrote posts (here and here) describing how they were working together to prepare for the Super Bowl this coming Sunday.”

Twitter’s main blog was updated today to state that they had chosen NTT America Enterprise Hosting Services as their new hosting provider.

I use Twitter frequently to relay personal and professional information daily (tweets coming from this and the ServePath blog when a new post is delivered, for example), as well as notifying contacts of my whereabouts when I’m at networking events, and will continue to use it. Twitter is an excellent service, imitated by many but still remaining a true leader within the space. (GoGrid is on Twitter here. And ServePath is on Twitter here.)

(more…) «TechCrunch: “Twitter and Joyent Split Amidst Downtime Travails”»

Of Interest: 2008 Predictions on Virtualized Hosting

Thursday, January 10th, 2008 by

There have been several articles and predictions written recently related to grid computing, virtualization and virtualized hosting, cloud computing and “green” hosting over the past few weeks. I have read through a number of these and thought that it might be of interested to highlight some that caught my attention. While by no means are these the de facto authorities of what will come, the commentaries do spark my interest and hopefully yours.

What is a Grid Server

In his article titled: “2007: The year in green,” Ted Sampson, senior analyst at InfoWorld, wrote:

Speaking of which, virtualization was the poster child of sustainable technology in 2007. Leveraging wares from the likes of VMware and XenSource, companies found they could reduce dramatically reduce the number of servers they needed to deliver their applications and services.

This rings true to me. Green computing is hot and will continue to be so. Companies looking to reduce their carbon footprint are well advised to start looking for alternatives to traditional server computing and hosting. The fact that one is now able to “virtualize” several servers on a smaller set of “noded” servers make this trend a hot one to watch.

Similarly, Jeff Kaplan, author of THINK IT Services mentions in his blog post called “Top Ten Reasons Why On-Demand Services Will Soar in 2008”: (more…) «Of Interest: 2008 Predictions on Virtualized Hosting»

And on the 3rd day, there was BLOG

Thursday, January 3rd, 2008 by

With much anticipation, I would like to announce the launch of the GoGrid blog! What’s a blog? Well, if you don’t know by now, you probably should start taking some basic Internet 101 courses (Wikipedia is your friend). What is GoGrid? It’s the latest product offering by ServePath. More about ServePath later. The focus here is on what YOU a GoGrid user or potential user can find here. First, if you haven’t taken a tour of the GoGrid site, I heartily recommend that you take a peak at the “coming soon” site so that you can immerse yourself in the newest, ground-breaking hosting technology available to you (well, full immersion is only available currently to our exclusive private beta members). Our Creative team is hard a work on a new, enhanced version of the GoGrid site so be sure to bookmark it!

available beta blog coming communication competitor create deep discussions email gogrid going hope idea immerse later manager market months networking nurturing offering pertinent plan posts powers private product provide recommend servepath service site social start subscribe success sure taken technology throwing tied tools twitter unique user virtualized waters web work

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