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Posts Tagged ‘scalability’

 

How To Create an Auto-Scaling Web Application on GoGrid (Part 1 – Theory)

Tuesday, April 23rd, 2013 by

Creating an auto-scaling web application is an ideal use of cloud computing. Although manually scaling your infrastructure is easy in the GoGrid cloud, programmatically controlling your infrastructure to scale automatically is an even better example of the power of the cloud. This scenario–an application that can increase and decrease its server count, and therefore capacity, based on the load it’s experiencing at any given time–makes IT professionals, sysadmins, and application developers alike extremely happy. And it’s also something you can build using out-of-the-box tools in GoGrid.

We’ve divided this topic into two articles:

Part 1 (this article) – The Theory of Auto-Scaling:

  • Background: traditional vs. cloud hosting
  • Programmatically architecting a solution
  • The underlying Orchestration methodology

Part 2 – A Proof of Concept of Auto-Scaling:

  • Do-it-yourself Orchestration
  • Proof-of-concept examples

(more…) «How To Create an Auto-Scaling Web Application on GoGrid (Part 1 – Theory)»

How To Scale Your GoGrid Infrastructure

Wednesday, February 13th, 2013 by

Scalability is one of the biggest benefits of cloud computing. Compared to traditional physical servers, cloud servers offer dynamic elasticity that allows businesses to scale “up” or “out” based on load or demand. Scaling “out” means adding more servers to your infrastructure and scaling “up” means adding resources (like RAM) to an existing cloud server.

Adding more cloud servers to your GoGrid infrastructure is easy, as is creating a GoGrid Server Image (GSI). Just a quick refresher: you would use a GSI to deploy copies of a particular server configuration or setup—this is horizontal scalability: create a GoGrid cloud server, save an image of it, and deploy copies of that server.

GoGrid-server-scale

But let’s say that you want a particular server to have a little more power. One of the best “upgrades” you can make to any computer or server is to add more RAM. Running applications consumes RAM (as does the underlying operating system). Giving that server more RAM will make it run even more efficiently.

So, how do you add more RAM to an existing GoGrid Cloud Server? Just like the 3-step processes before (Create a GoGrid Cloud Server – Select. Configure. Deploy. & Create a GoGrid Server Image – Select. Save. Share.), this process is equally easy:

1. Select
2. Configure
3. Scale

Before we walk through this process, it’s important to remember that RAM scaling only works on “hourly” GoGrid Cloud Servers. If your server is on a monthly, semi-annual, or annual plan, you won’t be able to scale your server. In that case, you’ll want to create a GSI of an existing server and then deploy a new hourly server based on that GSI. If you do have an hourly cloud server, the process is easy. (more…) «How To Scale Your GoGrid Infrastructure»

Got Growing Pains? 3 Ways to Painlessly Scale your Cloud

Wednesday, November 7th, 2012 by

Everybody wants to be successful. Although we can often learn from our mistakes, we can also avoid pitfalls and hurdles by doing a little bit of research and even some trial and error in advance. Part of being successful is choosing the right team, the right tools, and the right partner for your project. And when it comes to building out your company’s infrastructure, any solution or partner you choose should be cost-effective and helpful so you absolutely don’t compromise on reliability or performance.

Server-Fail-v2-sm

In order to be successful, your infrastructure should be ready for this success. Here are three things to think about when scaling your business and its infrastructure:

  1. Plan for success – Don’t think about just 1 week or 1 month down the road. Look at your historical information. Look at your competitor’s traffic. Is your industry seasonal? Figure out where those peaks and valleys are and plan for them.
  2. Do some testing – Don’t just hypothesize on how well your infrastructure will perform. Do some real world testing. There are many 3rd party software and SaaS solutions that can simulate load on your site. Test some various scenarios with and without extra infrastructure. Test your scaling, manual or automated.
  3. Plan also for failure – What if something doesn’t go as expected, are you ready for that? Part of developing a scalability strategy is also working on those less-than-positive scenarios. Planning for success is fun, but planning for failures is just as important.

How GoGrid can help

For more than 10 years, GoGrid has been delivering compelling infrastructure solutions worldwide. We believe in a consultative approach because we understand that every business needs solutions that fit their unique requirements. When it comes to success, cookie-cutter approaches simply don’t work.

(more…) «Got Growing Pains? 3 Ways to Painlessly Scale your Cloud»

From the Archives: GoGrid’s Vision of Cloud Computing circa 2007

Tuesday, June 26th, 2012 by

At GoGrid, we’ve been living and breathing cloud computing since well before we launched our Public Cloud in April 2008. The idea of combining automation, virtualization, utility-based billing, scalability, and ease of use was always at the core of our Public Cloud offering. This was the vision of CEO and Founder, John Keagy, many years before we actually released our Public Cloud to the masses. We had different product names for the evolution of what we now call “the GoGrid cloud,” including UtilityServe and Grid Series.

computer-monitors

The essence of UtilityServe was captured back in 2006 by VMblog.com (Virtualization Technology News and Information):

“UtilityServe is the first hosting service to enable customers to use a browser to easily build, deploy, manage and scale Web applications on demand, and pay only for the computing resources they need. By eliminating the traditional IT resource and cost barriers associated with owning and maintaining hardware infrastructure, UtilityServe enables customers to focus on providing applications and growing their businesses.”

As Keagy stated in the article:

“The dedicated server industry provided order-of-magnitude improvements in server computing, but utility computing is the Holy Grail,” said Keagy. “Grid computing has been a great theory, and we’re wonderfully excited to finally make it a reality with UtilityServe.”

(more…) «From the Archives: GoGrid’s Vision of Cloud Computing circa 2007»

Under The Radar 2012 Recap & Analysis – Summing Up Some Secret Startup Sauce (Part 2)

Thursday, May 3rd, 2012 by

I recently attended Under the Radar 2012 as GoGrid was a sponsor of this event. As there were several tracks, Michael Sheehan and I split the tracks and I covered Infrastructure, Database Scalability and Big Data. Michael covered Mobile Access, Infrastructure, Performance Monitoring, PaaS in Part 1.  Overall, the presenting companies have some compelling ideas and it gives an indicator as to the new thinking happening in Silicon Valley. The trends that I noticed were: a continued interest in private clouds, the increase in adoption of Openstack and the prevalence integrating Big Data.

UTR-logo1

If you never attended Under the Radar, the format is to have four startups that already have a real product present for 6 minutes and are then judged by a panel of experienced executives at more established companies. The presenters had to be companies that are actual startups with a unique value proposition and a real product that they are able to monetize. Alumni or companies that are already more established can also present as a “Grad Circle” member but they are not included in the awards presented at the end of the show. And like American Idol, the audience also has a vote on their favorites for each category.  I included the Judge’s choice and Audience choice for each category but also added my own choice which reflects my own opinion and not that of GoGrid.

Infrastructure

This category focused on companies that are delivering infrastructure or infrastructure management products. So this would include services that could offer up infrastructure components (like compute, network, and storage) or even tools for managing configurations and deployments. Not surprisingly, nearly all of them focus on the cloud as the operating model of choice.

Cloudscaling – This company focuses on delivering an amazon-like cloud using Openstack. Their solution is comprised of Open Cloud OS, which is a product grade version of Openstack, Cloudblocks, a comprehensive architecture for cloud services and Hardware Blueprints, which are templates for physical hardware. Customers can leverage this solution to deploy a public or private cloud in their own DC.

(more…) «Under The Radar 2012 Recap & Analysis – Summing Up Some Secret Startup Sauce (Part 2)»