Posts Tagged ‘SaaS’

 

GoGrid Cloud Survey Report – What is Cloud Computing and Do You Use It?

Monday, April 18th, 2011 by

In January and February of 2011, GoGrid polled over 500 IT professionals, CTOs and developers and asked for their thoughts on cloud computing, how they currently use the cloud and where they think the industry is headed. The results of this survey shed new light on how the cloud stands in 2011 and what we can expect as we move towards 2012.

We have taken the key findings of the survey and created several interesting charts and graphics. Because of the extensive nature of the survey, we will be releasing the findings in topical blog posts over the coming months, but you can download the full survey results data at any time by clicking here.

With much speculation and debate about what cloud computing is, the first questions we asked the industry is what they believe cloud computing encompassed – Software as a Service (SaaS), Platform as a Service (PaaS) or Infrastructure as a Service (SaaS).

Question: When you think of “cloud”, what does it mean to you? What does the “cloud” encompass?

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As seen in the responses to this question the majority of IT professionals are in agreement that all 3 services make up cloud computing, but emphasized Software as a Service and Infrastructure as a Service. More importantly, we wanted to know what percentage of the IT industry actually uses cloud technology for their business. Most people are familiar with SaaS (e.g., Gmail and SalesForce). But interestingly, IaaS seems to be almost on par with SaaS according to respondents. (more…) «GoGrid Cloud Survey Report – What is Cloud Computing and Do You Use It?»

What the Heck is the Cloud Anyway!?

Thursday, February 10th, 2011 by

The word “cloud” has become a bit of a buzzword in the IT industry. Well, let me rephrase that, it has become a HUGE and overused buzzword not just within various tech sectors, it has also infiltrated the lives of us all. A year or two ago, if you mentioned “cloud” or even “cloud computing” to the average passerby, they might have looked back at you with a cloudy look on their face (sorry). Terms like “public cloud,” “private cloud,” “hybrid cloud” and “false cloud” are currently thrown around and peppered throughout conversations. And now, especially exemplified by Microsoft’s recent ad campaign, the phrase “To the cloud!” seems to have brought clouds to everyone, including the general public.

We are being bombarded from every angle. So what do they mean?

Some seem to be useful in our everyday lives:

Others seem to be a bit ominous (as is seen in this tweet from Marc Benioff – Chairman & CEO of SalesForce.com):

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But even with everyone talking about “clouds” now, they are still confusing.

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The truth is, clouds can take on many different forms, shapes, sizes and characteristics.

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Cloud” is one of the most confusing terms currently in the computing world, but we aim to clear up this nebulous term. Today we release a new white paper titled “Skydiving Through the Clouds” which explains what clouds are, how they work, who uses them and why they are becoming of growing importance within the IT industry.

Download “Skydiving Through the Clouds”

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GoGrid and art of defence Partner to Provide First Distributed Web Application Firewall (dWAF) in the Cloud

Tuesday, March 2nd, 2010 by

Today art of defence and GoGrid announced the availability of the Industry’s first Distributed Web Application Firewall running within the GoGrid cloud. This is a cloud-based SaaS (Software as a Service) solution called hyperguard™ and can be easily and quickly deployed using a GoGrid Partner Server Image (GSI). By using a GoGrid Server Image running art of defence’s hyperguard SaaS, customers can be assured that they are receiving robust application-level protection beyond simply the network layer within their cloud environment.

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By deploying the hyperguard-enabled GoGrid Server Image, GoGrid users simply have to configure their applications and their respective protection levels through hyperguard‘s web-base GUI which allows for comprehensive attack detection and protection at the Web Application layer. hyperguard SaaS basic (which is currently available on GoGrid for $39/mo/server plus associated GoGrid RAM/Bandwidth costs) offers web application security monitoring, detection-only and protection modes.

Hyperguard SaaS Standard dWAF provides the following key capabilities:

  • Security monitoring at the application layer of attacks like SQL-injection, cross site scripting and OWASP Top10 for all applications delivered on the hyperguard web server GSI
  • Comprehensive baseline protection against known attacks at the application layer – only if rule sets are run in protection mode
  • Automated updates of baseline protection rule sets by art of defence – with testing capability for these new rule sets via detect-only mode

The GoGrid Server Image is available now through GoGrid:

(more…) «GoGrid and art of defence Partner to Provide First Distributed Web Application Firewall (dWAF) in the Cloud»

GoGrid Customers Can Now Use New Relic’s RPM to Monitor, Troubleshoot & Tune Java/Ruby Web Applications

Tuesday, January 12th, 2010 by

Today, New Relic announced that their RPM product supports GoGrid Cloud Hosting Infrastructure and is available for a limited time with preferential pricing. RPM is an on-demand tool that companies can use to optimize, monitor and troubleshoot their Java, Ruby and JRuby applications within a variety of environments, which now includes the GoGrid cloud.

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With New Relic’s RPM running on GoGrid, users can monitor many aspects of a Ruby, Java or JRuby application, detect performance problems and eventually drill down to uncover root causes of any performance issues. RPM also cleanly integrates with other development tools.

There are several RPM Service Plans available for GoGrid customers to choose from including:

  • RPM Lite
  • RPM Bronze
  • RPM Silver
  • RPM Gold
  • RPM Enterprise

The graphic below clearly depicts the differences between each tier:

(more…) «GoGrid Customers Can Now Use New Relic’s RPM to Monitor, Troubleshoot & Tune Java/Ruby Web Applications»

McKinsey’s McCrazy! Flying through the Clouds with Eyes 1/2 Closed

Friday, May 1st, 2009 by

half-closed plane windowThe recent McKinsey reportClearing the air on cloud computing” has caused quite a bit of stir within the cloud community, and I can see why. While it definitely brings a good deal of analysis to the table, I feel it is somewhat generalized, makes assumptions and does overlook some key points.

First and foremost, this article is NOT going to be an analytical discussion of the cost of running or setting up a datacenter vs. an Amazon EC2 Windows instance. I’m not a financial analyst. Honestly, calculating the Total Cost of Assets (TCA) or Total Cost of Operations (TCO) causes my eyes to roll back into my head leaving me gasping for air. Don’t get me wrong, it seems like some good effort was made analyzing data and formulating conclusions. The problem is, I feel that they were on a jetliner, shooting through the clouds with the shades 1/2 down.

Before I start with my own analysis and commentary, I would like to reference a few responses I have read that somewhat chastise McKinsey.

Three “Rebuttal” Articles to Read

The first comes from CIO IT Drilldown’s Virtualization site. In his articleMcKinsey Cloud Computing Report Conclusions Don’t Add Up,” Bernard Golden does the major lifting for me in terms of analysis. I have highlighted some key points from the article that I viewed to be particularly important (my highlighted version of the article is here). I particularly enjoyed Golden’s rebuttal to the analysis of cost calculations, namely use of EC2 Windows instances, headcounts that don’t add up and other “less visible” capital expenses for facilities and other assets. Also as Golden points out, McKinsey proposes that better efficiencies and savings can be realized through virtualization within the organization. To me, the McKinsey recommendation seems a bit counter-intuitive: “Don’t go with a vendor whose expertise IS virtualization, hardware, infrastructure, et al. Instead, DO try to do it yourself, with tremendous CapEx & OpEx expense.” Hmmm, makes sense to me, NOT! Lastly, I particularly liked Golden’s 3 recommendations (quoted from article):

  1. Review your portfolio of applications to understand what cloud computing means to you.
  2. Create a viable financial model for assessing the true costs of internal hosting.
  3. Evaluate the potential for an internal cloud even if the numbers don’t work with an external cloud provider.

(more…) «McKinsey’s McCrazy! Flying through the Clouds with Eyes 1/2 Closed»