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Posts Tagged ‘redundancy’

 

Learn How a GoGrid Customer Created a Multiple Data Center Routing & Failover Infrastructure Environment

Tuesday, March 22nd, 2011 by

We absolutely LOVE hearing how GoGrid customers are using our cloud solutions to create unique “cloud fingerprints” and environments using the features and data centers of GoGrid. Paul Trippett just published a very interesting write-up of an infrastructure environment that addresses many of the common concerns facing any company looking to provide a highly-redundant infrastructure while also ensuring a solid Service Level Agreement (SLA) for their customers.

customer_showcase_GoGrid_logo_sm

You can find Paul’s original write-up titled “Utilizing GoGrid’s Multiple Data Centers for Routing and Failover” on his site. With his permission, we have reposted the article so that others can learn, mimic and build upon his unique scenario.

At the beginning of the year one of our customers asked us if we can provide an SLA for StormRETS and with it, the sound gritting teeth suddenly echoed around the room. As you can imagine, this caused more questions than which we actually had answers for:

blockquote_2 What kind of SLA did we want to provide and what could we realistically provide?

Our hosting provider, at the time, had an SLA which entailed “We don’t give any guarantee that your servers will be available, but if for any reason they are unavailable we will get the back up and running as soon as we can.”, erm, how on earth can we build a SLA based on that. It was decided at this time we would migrate our servers to another hosting provider, one at least with a SLA we can build on and a company we can actually contact directly should a problem arise.

(more…) «Learn How a GoGrid Customer Created a Multiple Data Center Routing & Failover Infrastructure Environment»

How To Set Up High Availability Web Applications in the Cloud using GoGrid

Tuesday, April 14th, 2009 by

Web Applications like WordPress, Drupal, Joomla, SugarCRM and others are all the rage and have been for quite a while. The huge availability of Open Source applications, typically based on Linux, Apache, mySQL and PHP (LAMP stacks) that you can find in SourceForge or other repositories, makes the implementation of powerful web-based solutions a snap. Once you find the web application of your dreams, the next step is finding a hosting provider. There are many VPS (Virtual Private Server) hosting providers that offer shared hosting at pennies on the dollar. But with those VPS solutions, you are left with exactly that, a “shared” environment. So, if someone else on your shared server is running bad scripts or code that sucks up resources on your server, you are affected with little or no recourse to resolve other than to complain, moan or move to a different provider.

So, as you grow (or as your service deteriorates due to the resource-sucking of others on your shared box), you are left with a decision of what to do next. Many people choose the most obvious upgrade path of leasing a dedicated server (e.g., at ServePath, we offer dedicated, managed hosting) or colocating (where you bring your own hardware and a hosting provider like Coloserve leases space, power, cooling, security and bandwidth). But now, you have another option that truly fits the model of delivering scalable web hosting…put in in the Cloud, with GoGrid, for example.

Recently I helped map out the implementation of a secure, redundant, load-balanced web application in the Cloud using GoGrid.

Original Setup

A client originally set up the following implementation of a WordPress blog on GoGrid:

Availability in the Cloud

Monday, July 28th, 2008 by

Today I came across a very interesting post, written by Mukul Kumar, which poses an intriguing topic of Cloud availability. Spawned most likely because of some “lack” of availability on Amazon’s S3 recently, Kumar discusses how companies might want to look towards creating redundancy across Cloud providers (such as GoGrid) in order to increase the availability of a company’s online presence.

All too frequently, companies look to a single solution for their hosting options, whether it be within the Cloud or using more traditional hosting methods. These single solutions can easily translate into single sources of failure, “don’t put your eggs in one basket” being the phrase the comes to mind.

Kumar illustrates some ways to make a company’s Cloud reliance a bit more redundant by using some traditional methods of choosing various providers.

cloud_availability

Using a fairly straight-forward rsync (an open source utility that provides fast incremental file transfer) methodology, Kumar shows how servers can be configured as hot-standbys using different Cloud providers, allowing for redundancy to take place.

ha-config2

(more…) «Availability in the Cloud»