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Posts Tagged ‘Public Cloud’

 

Building private cloud infrastructure

Friday, July 5th, 2013 by

Although the proliferation of public cloud computing technologies has encouraged a large portion of the business world to migrate resources to an off-site environment, many decision-makers believe managing their own assets can be more beneficial. For this reason, among others, enterprise executives often prefer to leverage a private cloud architecture that enables them to satisfy numerous goals that cannot be met while using only the public cloud.

Building a private cloud infrastructure

Building a private cloud infrastructure

Yet constructing a private cloud is not a simple one-and-done process. A recent InfoWorld report highlighted how constructing a private infrastructure is similar to building a data center, though it is distinct in several ways. For one, the management layer capabilities are different in a private cloud than they are in a premise-based virtualization architecture.

InfoWorld noted that private clouds, for the most part, will offer some level of self-service, which is important for organizations that need to manage various solutions throughout their life cycle. Unlike conventional data centers, however, these management capabilities must be available to business units, not just the IT department. This is because it is often too time-consuming to have business teams consult with IT every time servers must be commissioned or other processes need to happen.

By working with a trusted service provider, companies can be sure they implement private clouds with the appropriate management capabilities for the workforce as a whole.

Leveled security
In traditional IT environments, IT controls the majority of security controls, which makes administrative considerations unnecessary. Because the private cloud enables individuals to decommission, deploy and manage servers on their own, decision-makers need to ensure they have the ability to protect sensitive information and resources during these procedures, InfoWorld noted.

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Cloud opportunities, benefits exceed global expectations

Friday, May 31st, 2013 by

When cloud computing first emerged, IT analysts had mixed feelings about the hosted services, unsure if they would be embraced or disregarded in the enterprise. Today, experts understand that the cloud now plays a central role in the ongoing development of the business world, providing decision-makers and employees with innovative solutions for growth and performance improvements.

Cloud opportunities, benefits exceed global expectations

Cloud opportunities, benefits exceed global expectations

Companies are using a mix of different cloud models, including Platform, Software and Infrastructure as a Service, all with positive results. In fact, a recent CA Technologies survey of IT decision-makers who have been using the cloud for at least a year found that the benefits of using the hosted solutions are exceeding many respondents’ expectations.

Many executives highlighted the cost-saving advantages of the cloud. This is because the ongoing use of the cloud is allowing decision-makers to become more familiar with the technology and, as a result, establish new goals and objectives. “Cost is often considered an early benefit – or even a required result – in order for IT teams to justify moving in the direction of the cloud,” said John Michelsen, chief technology officer of CA Technologies. “Once they show that cloud computing improves the bottom line, they can shift their focus to innovation and other objectives, such as increased performance and enhanced security.”

Who is using the cloud?
CA Technologies found several unique distinctions between organizations planning to invest more in cloud servers and other solutions within the next year and firms that are still on the fence. First, businesses that have been using the cloud for four or more years are roughly six times as likely to spend more money on the hosted services in 2013 than their counterparts that are relatively newer to the environment. This suggests that companies that have done more than just tested the water are more comfortable with the cloud and are experiencing greater results.

Second, the study found that organizations in the United States are more likely to invest in the cloud this year than businesses in the U.K., France, Germany, Italy and Benelux. In fact, 48 percent of U.S. respondents stated they plan to up cloud spending by up to 30 percent, while another 17 percent will invest even more. This is a stark contrast between the 42 percent and 4 percent, respectively, of European IT decision-makers.

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Public, private clouds disrupt future data centers

Thursday, April 11th, 2013 by

In the past, small businesses and large enterprises both solely used on-premise data centers because they were the only real technology available for decision-makers looking to improve operations through the use of digital technologies. Today is much different, as many organizations are now migrating massive workloads to external cloud computing environments in an attempt to reduce costs, relieve internal stress and ensure individuals have access to mission-critical resources from virtually anywhere at any time.

Public, private clouds disrupt future data centers

Public, private clouds disrupt future data centers

Yet decision-makers are still unsure which route to take in their deployment of the “next-generation data center.” In some cases, executives will continue migrating operations to external cloud-based environments, while others will keep sensitive information on internal clouds. Others still will adopt a hybrid approach, in which both internal and external clouds are used. The question remains, which method will be the most effective for 21st century companies?

In reality, this question can only be answered when decision-makers understand how their organization works. If an enterprise is pursuing teleworking trends, which enable employees to work from anywhere, the public cloud can introduce significant benefits. Because the hosted environments are managed by a third party, they are accessible via any device from any location. This means individuals in a coffee shop down the street can access the same resources as colleagues working inside the office – if they are authorized to view the same content, that is.

Conversely, if an organization is charged with managing highly sensitive information that can cause substantial problems if released, the private cloud may be a better option. Private services are not multi-tenant environments like their public counterparts, making it less likely that confidential data will be exposed.

Still, companies often take various approaches when augmenting their data center.

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What is Auto-Scaling, How Does it Work, & Why Should I Use it?

Monday, March 11th, 2013 by

When I think about the phrase “auto-scaling,” for some reason it conjures up the word “Transformers.” For those not familiar with the Transformers genre of cartoons, toys, games, and movies, it is essentially about cars that turn into robots or vise versa, depending on how you look at it. When they need to fight or confront a challenge, Transformers will scale up from a vehicle (a car, truck, airplane, etc.) into a much larger robot. Then, when the challenge subsides, they scale back down to a vehicle.

Transformers 4 Movie

Image source: teaser.trailer.com

Scaling Explained

Scaling – in terms of infrastructure – is a similar concept, but applied to the horizontal or vertical scaling of servers. Horizontal scaling means adding (or removing) servers within an infrastructure environment. Vertical scaling involves adding resources to an existing server (like RAM).

Let’s look at an example. An author of a content creation website may write an article that attracts the attention of the social media community. What starts as a few views of the article per minute, once shared by many in social media, may result in hundreds or thousands of requests for this article per minute. When this spike in demand occurs, the load to the server or servers handling the website’s content may experience extreme load, affecting its ability to respond in a timely manner. The results can vary from long page loads to the server actually crashing under the additional peak load. In the past, this scenario used to be known as the “Digg effect” or “Slashdot effect.”

Although this type of success is great publicity for the author, it’s bad for the brand hosting the content. And, if users encounter slow or inaccessible websites, they’re less likely to return for other content at a later point, which can eventually result in a loss of revenue.

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Public Cloud Infrastructure Continues Gaining Momentum

Wednesday, March 6th, 2013 by

As the prospect of using cloud infrastructure technologies continues to influence decision-makers to adopt hosted services, companies are forced to choose which model they will implement: the private, public or hybrid network. In most cases, organizations are opting for the public cloud, because its multi-tenant environment and low buy-in opportunity lets firms of all sizes embrace the services.

A recent report by Gartner highlighted the progress of the public cloud, noting that it is forecast to generate roughly $131 billion in revenue in 2013, up 18.5 percent from the 2012 value of $111 billion. As executives gain more confidence in the cloud, they will leverage the solutions for a broader range of purposes, hoping to extend the value of the services to more departments and teams within the organization.

Public cloud infrastructure continues gaining momentum

Public cloud infrastructure continues gaining momentum

“The continued growth of the cloud services market will result from the adoption of cloud services for production systems and workloads, in addition to the development and testing scenarios that have led as the most prominent use case for public cloud services to date,” said Ed Anderson, research director at Gartner. “Evidence of this growth is found in the increasing demand for cloud services from end-user organizations, met by an increased supply of cloud services from suppliers.”

Some models garner more appreciation than others
Although the majority of the public cloud market is forecast to increase, certain segments of the industry will experience faster or more substantial growth than others. Because so many organizations are looking to augment storage, general computing and printing services, for example, the cloud infrastructure portion of the sector is forecast to develop quicker than other services.

Analysts said Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) grew 42.4 percent in 2012 to generate $6.1 billion in revenue and this rate will continue into this year, expanding 47.3 percent to $9 billion in revenue. This rapid evolution will make IaaS the fastest-growing cloud segment of the global market.

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