Posts Tagged ‘Private Cloud’

 

Winning & Socializing with Big Data & The Cloud – GoGrid Sponsors 10th Int’l Cloud Expo

Tuesday, June 5th, 2012 by

Next week in New York City, cloud aficionados and Big Data proponents from around the world will convene on the 10th International Cloud Computing Expo in Javits Convention Center in New York City. From June 11 – 14th, conference attendees will be introduced to new advancements in cloud computing, learn how they can optimize their businesses using the cloud and understand how Big Data and Cloud Computing work hand-in-hand to help produce compelling new services and offerings analyzing and hosting the zetabytes of new data being collected from the social and enterprise web.

syscon-cloudexpo-nyc-2012

GoGrid has been a long-time sponsor of the SYS-CON Cloud Expo conferences, especially the one in Silicon Valley which is just a short drive from our corporate headquarters in San Francisco, CA. We are excited to be able to meet face-to-face with many of our constituents on the East Coast as Silicon Alley continues to produce new and exciting startups and compelling new businesses.

Get a Free VIP Expo Pass

Not yet attending or a last minute planner? We have you covered! You can be our guest at the Cloud Expo by simply completing this online form. As you register, in the Priority Code, just enter gogridVIPgold which will change the price of admission from $2000 to $0.

What’s In Store for You & GoGrid at the Expo?

(more…) «Winning & Socializing with Big Data & The Cloud – GoGrid Sponsors 10th Int’l Cloud Expo»

Understanding the Differences in Private Clouds – A Video Explanation

Tuesday, May 29th, 2012 by

When it comes to cloud computing, you have a variety of choices to make should you decide that you want the cloud powering your products and services. Do you go for a Cloud Application or traverse down the Cloud Pyramid to a Platform or Cloud Infrastructure service? Each layer represents different strengths and weaknesses in terms of control, breadth and depth of service and cost. Obviously, you should choose the solution that is both the most flexible and cost effective to suit your business or application needs. But sometimes the choices can simply be daunting. We are here to help – it’s important to choose a cloud partner and not simply a provider.

To add more complexity to the mix, there are now a few choices for Private Cloud deployments and implementations and yes, private clouds are hot right now. Why would you want a private cloud in the first place? Perhaps your organization deals with confidential data or needs to meet some compliance requirements. Or does your company have requirements the dictate limited or no public Internet access? Perhaps your corporation is looking to roll out cloud infrastructure for various divisions and needs to control cloud sprawl and renegade cloud “purchases?”

inhouse-vs-hosted-privcloud

To make things simple, there are really two choices for a private cloud: do-it-yourself in-house OR use a managed solution. There are some pretty clear differences between the two but instead of me listing them out, sit back and watch this 4 minute video to help explain the differences:

Did that help? Want to learn more? We have more information and additional resources over at PrivateCloud.GoGrid.com including: (more…) «Understanding the Differences in Private Clouds – A Video Explanation»

Peering Back at the Clouds – 7 Cloud Predictions from 2011

Thursday, December 22nd, 2011 by

As is my annual custom, at the beginning of each year or as we are entering into a new year, I try to make some educated guesses as to the direction that Cloud Computing will take us. In December, 2010, I published “Peering Out at the Horizon – 7 Cloud Computing Predictions for 2011” and now is the time that I reflect back to see how well these predictions actually did. Just as a reminder, the predictions that I made were my own personal opinion and may not reflect others at GoGrid.

2011-looking-back

Here is a quick recap of the 2011 Cloud Computing predictions I made and I have also mentioned how I think the prediction faired at the end of 2011:

  1. IT Procurement Includes Cloud Requisitioning – Part of me was really hoping that this would come to fruition a bit more than it did. Essentially, I believe that the Enterprise and Business Units therein would begin loosening up a bit in terms of the procurement of IT resources. It still seems that there is a division of this process. Traditional IT managers are looking to extend their hold on the physical and data center environments that they “own” and manage. However, as Gartner analyst, Lydia Leong posits, there are also those who are considered “circumventors” who bypass the traditional IT procurement process and go to the public cloud to get project-based infrastructure. The circumventers use whatever tools possible to get their jobs done. They love the characteristics and qualities of the cloud. Conversely, those IT traditionalists view the cloud as risky. They want to ensure that infrastructure is compliant, safe, secure and carefully managed. They are worried about “cloud sprawl” and not having control over infrastructure in the cloud. While previously, these groups had heated political battles about whose method was the proper one, in 2012, they will realize that both methods have advantages and by working together, they can minimize the risks. The use of Cloud Bridging (joining on-prem to public cloud), Cloud Bursting (expanding to the public cloud when resources require it), and Hybrid Hosting (combining physical and virtual appliances within the same environment) will provide both sides of these dueling mindsets with ways to get along.
    Prediction results: There is definitely some headway being made to bridge the gap between these two forces within organizations. The lines are blurring as different ways to procure both cloud and physical infrastructure are emerging.
  2. Private Clouds and Public Cloud Act to Catalyze Each Other – There is still the ongoing debate as to which comes first, a public cloud or a private cloud. It really depends who you talk to within an organization. There are those circumventers who simply “expense” the use of a public cloud and there are those traditionalists, as I mentioned, who will make all attempts to re-use existing infrastructure and make it “cloudy.” However, there are more and more companies that look to a hybridization of infrastructure, where they are creating Virtual Private Clouds to ensure better data security or compliance while leveraging existing physical infrastructures. Private clouds can definitely whet the appetites of organizations who are looking at the cloud for more efficient utilization of IT resources. And I still believe that once private clouds prove their use, there are more possibilities for public cloud adoption.
    Prediction results: We are seeing a continued growth of cloud computing in general, and within that, a mixture of the types of clouds being used, pure public or private, cloud bursting, cloud bridging, hybrid clouds and hybrid hosting in general.
  3. “Cloud Washing” Backlash Begins – Cloud washing occurs when an infrastructure vendor takes its traditional, legacy or older service offering and they simply slap the term “cloud” on it. Companies seem to be doing a better job at disguising their non-cloud (or even “false cloud”) offerings into something that resembles a cloud offering. It’s still “buyer beware” with these types of services, in my opinion. Ensure that the cloud provider you choose passes the cloud-litmus test. You shouldn’t have to have a big capital expenditure, services should be dynamic and scalable, you should be billed based on usage and the service should be consumed via internet services.
    Prediction results: For the most part, there wasn’t as much of a backlash as I would have predicted. Either cloud buyers are simply unaware of cloud-washing or it simply doesn’t matter to them and they are still getting what they believe to be cloud services. I just hope they don’t get buyers remorse once they dive a bit deeper into their selected vendor.
  4. Cracks Show with Internal Clouds as Hosted Private Clouds Emerge – The idea here is that corporations who rushed out to buy hardware and virtualization licenses in order to implement their own private cloud are now reeling from sticker shock and a high TCO. Private clouds are important to organizations, especially if data security and privacy are core requirements. However as the tab for running and maintaining a private cloud continues to climb, enterprises and larger organizations are now looking for financial and human capital efficiencies in their infrastructure management and growth. GoGrid introduced the Hosted Private Cloud service earlier this year and we are seeing great traction. In fact, Orange Business Services has been using GoGrid’s Hosted Private Cloud since early on this year. You can see their case study here.
    Prediction results: As I mention, Hosted Private Cloud interest and sales are seeing strong numbers at GoGrid and there are other cloud vendors who are now starting to offer similar services. Expect this movement to grow in 2012.
  5. Community & Sharing Of and Within the Cloud – With a proliferation of cloud services in the marketplace, it is only natural that aggregation and inter-networking of disparate clouds begin to form. With outages always a possibility, it’s important for organizations to build for failure and this is where multi-cloud utilization is important for disaster recover plans. Companies like Racemi are leveraging migration plays that can help corporations distribute their infrastructure across multiple public clouds.
    Predictions results: For the most part, the growth of peripheral cloud integration and migration services, including professional services companies, showed pretty solid growth this year with cloud consumers realizing that there are options and a plethora of services from which to choose.
  6. Breaking Down International Cloud Borders – Many analysts have said that the US is leading the cloud computing charge with Europe & Asia closely following. There are a few cloud vendors within Europe, but not to the extent of the United States. Being able to use a single cloud vendor for world-wide distribution and utilization of cloud services is critical to many companies. While due to the Patriot Act, European companies need to host their EU-centric services in Europe, many also use US-based cloud provider for their US-audiences.
    Prediction results: The European expansion started this year and won’t be slowing down any time soon as US cloud providers are realizing the importance of having a physical presence overseas. But this could all change…
  7. Cloud Standards Battle Heats Up – Cloud computing is rapidly becoming an established IT movement and no longer viewed as being simply hype or an alternative to traditional IT. It is not only replacing legacy IT environments, but also companies are building for the cloud from the get-go. While some public clouds are consumed in a proprietary manner (which causes quite a built of vendor lock-in if you build specifically for them), others are more open, allowing for easier migrations and deployments. A more flexible or adaptable (standards-based) cloud provider requires less specialization of the IT or Development teams working with that particular cloud provider. In fact, some Certification programs, generalized for Cloud Computing, are emerging as well. This indirectly pushes the marketplace toward standardization of offerings and services.
    Prediction results: While the standardization process is still a bit cloudy, progress is definitely being made. Via certifications, developers and IT professionals can now tout their cloud experience and knowledge which allows companies and individuals to document their proficiency in not only what cloud is, but also how to use it and the best ways to use it.

Whew, there you have it – my analysis and synopsis of some predictions I made early in 2011 on the directions of Cloud Computing this year. Again, these are merely my predictions and analysis and may not reflect others within GoGrid.

(more…) «Peering Back at the Clouds – 7 Cloud Predictions from 2011»

How To Build a Virtual Private Cloud on GoGrid

Wednesday, December 14th, 2011 by

At GoGrid, we are often asked to provide solutions for a variety of use cases. More often than not, businesses are not looking for “standard” cloud implementations. And what really is “standard?” When you think about it, every business has unique needs in order to satisfy their cloud challenges. We help companies craft these solutions daily and we call it Creating a Cloud Fingerprint. But, as is the nature of cloud computing, many users desire to figure it out themselves, simply because solutions can be architected fairly easily, and if it isn’t quite right, they can be modified.

In our regular discussions with companies looking for information on how they can benefit from cloud Infrastructure as a Service, we often come across the same set of hurdles, namely:

  • Most established companies have an existing infrastructure investment, and may not be willing or able to sacrifice these investments,
  • Some infrastructure components may not be generally available through IaaS vendors, such as Enterprise security or storage infrastructure,
  • Some applications or data will be deemed “too sensitive” for the cloud due to internal objections or compliance constraints,
  • Maintaining and growing an on-premise solution or even data center is not only difficult, but extremely expensive,
  • Doing a full migration to the cloud comes with a very high conversion and operational cost,
  • Business simply are unsure as to how to best leverage cloud computing.

With these challenges in mind, we have a solution that allows business not only to utilize their existing infrastructure, but also leverage GoGrid’s public cloud to create a Virtual Private Cloud on GoGrid.

But, addressing the points above is critical in the solution. Therefore, we wanted to be sure:

  • Customers could retain their existing infrastructure,
  • GoGrid’s platform is used as an EXTENSION of that infrastructure,
  • GoGrid’s customers have a wide range of network security options/policies available,
  • Customers are able to fully leverage the advantages of cloud infrastructure, and the elimination of capital expenditures and their associated resource costs,
  • A customer can fully utilize their existing infrastructure investment.

(more…) «How To Build a Virtual Private Cloud on GoGrid»

GoGrid Cloud Survey Report – The Importance of Private Clouds (Part 5)

Monday, July 25th, 2011 by

As you may recall, at the beginning of 2011 we polled over 500 CTOs, developers and IT professionals asking them about various aspects of cloud computing. Questions included: What is cloud computing and how do you use it?, What security measures do you require in the cloud? and many more. The data from this cloud survey report provides a good idea of the current cloud computing landscape and upcoming trends as we race towards 2012.

Continuing on in the series, we wanted to know what IT professionals thought of cloud computing’s latest innovation: the private cloud. Private clouds have quickly become the topic of much conversation in the industry because they offer core public cloud technology but within a single-tenant environment. Before we jump into the results of our question, What aspects of the private cloud are most important to your organization?, it is important to have a clear understanding of what private clouds are.

What are private clouds?

There are quite a few ways how private clouds differ from public cloud offerings but I won’t go into all of the differences within this post. As I mentioned above, there is the idea of tenancy. To broadly generalize, public clouds are multi-tenant and private clouds are single-tenant. To expand on this concept a bit more, public clouds provide shared resources for consumption by multiple companies or organizations within the same server cluster. However, these resources are dedicated and fully isolated to those users in that networking, storage, RAM and CPU units are allocated to those users. This is very different than traditional shared hosting or VPS’s (Virtual Private Servers) – shared or VPS environments can, at times, suffer from over-allocation of resources or degraded performance if one user on a particular “machine” is “hogging” those resources. Public clouds effectively isolate those resources so that customers don’t experience usage hogs.

Private clouds are essentially public clouds but in an environment dedicated to one company, thus “single-tenant.” That does not mean though, that a private cloud cannot host multiple departments or business units from that single organization. Basically, a private cloud dedicates all of the resources to a single company or corporation and serves just that organization. The computer, storage and networking resources are most likely either owned by that organization, hosted by that organization or running exclusively for that organization but managed by another vendor (see GoGrid’s Hosted Private Cloud).

Private clouds frequently come at a higher cost than traditional public clouds mainly because public clouds give you economies of scale via larger infrastructure installations. Some companies may prefer operating in a non-shared environment due the higher amounts of control that they have on the infrastructure and the hardware or due to compliance or regulatory concerns.

(more…) «GoGrid Cloud Survey Report – The Importance of Private Clouds (Part 5)»