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Posts Tagged ‘performance’

 

Press Release: SOASTA Announces Cloud-based Performance Certification Program for Websites and Applications

Tuesday, July 21st, 2009 by

Interested in “Cloud Testing for Real World Performance?” SOASTA is poised to become the leading provider of cloud testing of web applications. Their new CloudTest On-Demand service helps customers and businesses ensure optimal performance and end-user experience.

CloudTest_SOASTA

Today, SOASTA issued a Press Release covering this new Certification Program which allows companies to certify that their applications and websites “have been tested and meet or exceed industry benchmarks for performance at peak levels of user traffic.” GoGrid is proud to be among the industry leaders supporting this certification program.

The full release is available at the SOASTA site as well as below:

SOASTA Announces Cloud-based Performance Certification Program for Websites and Applications

Diverse group of companies support the creation of a certification process to build confidence in website performance and reliability

(more…) «Press Release: SOASTA Announces Cloud-based Performance Certification Program for Websites and Applications»

Measuring the Performance of Clouds – GoGrid

Tuesday, March 17th, 2009 by

Raditha Dissanayake posted a blog entry comparing Amazon EC2 and GoGrid performance. Unfortunately, we think Raditha did not use the most rigorous methodology possible for doing his comparison. It would be inappropriate for GoGrid to performance test Amazon’s EC2. In fact, their Customer Agreement may actually make such activity questionable, but IANAL (I Am Not A Lawyer).

Let’s take a more rigorous look at GoGrid disk subsystem performance.

Framing the Issue

As a start the entire issue is a LOT more complex than can potentially be covered here. Today’s disks, hard drive controllers, and operating systems have many different kinds of caching mechanisms. In addition, virtualization systems like Xen can impact results in unexpected ways. For example, did you know that Xen can be deployed in two major manners?

Either ‘paravirtualized’ or ‘hardware virtualized’. The two different models almost certainly impact any testing methodology. And yes, you guessed it, Amazon and GoGrid don’t configure Xen in the same way. Amazon uses paravirtualization and GoGrid uses hardware virtualization. Beyond this public information neither Amazon nor GoGrid provide significant details about their infrastructure considering it, rightfully so, proprietary intellectual property.

Without a deep understanding of all of the issues it’s difficult to do a test much less a proper comparison.

(more…) «Measuring the Performance of Clouds – GoGrid»