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Posts Tagged ‘performance’

 

High RAM Cloud Servers for Distributed Caching

Tuesday, June 10th, 2014 by

GoGrid has just released High RAM Cloud Servers on our high-performance fabric. These servers are designed to provide a high amount of available RAM that is most commonly required for caching servers. Like our other recent product releases, these servers are all built on our redundant 10-Gbps public and private network.

High RAM Cloud Servers are available in the following configurations:

High RAM RAM Cores SSD Storage
X-Large 16 GB 4 40 GB
2X-Large 32 GB 8 40 GB
4X-Large 64 GB 16 40 GB
8X-Large 128 GB 28 40 GB
16X-Large 256 GB 40 40 GB

 

 

 

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Revving Up Your Engines in the Cloud – Performance Counts! GoGrid Judging at Under the Radar 2012

Monday, April 23rd, 2012 by

When you purchase a car, you obviously think a lot about its performance before you buy. How much horsepower does it have? Is the car safe? How does it handle? Is the gas mileage going to break the bank or will you be saving the environment? Is the vehicle flexible enough to meet all your needs or just suitable for one activity like off-roading?

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When you think about cloud computing, specifically cloud infrastructure, performance matters as well. And there are many factors to consider when shopping for a cloud provider or partner. How’s their VM performance? Does their network provide multiple high-bandwidth pipes to support your network-hungry application or service? Are there any I/O bottlenecks? If your website comes under heavy load, can you burst to support it and then scale back when demand subsides?

These are important considerations. Would you want a car that has no acceleration when getting on a highway? Probably not. That’s the same reason you wouldn’t want a cloud that is over-subscribed or doesn’t have the architecture to support your business needs.

Speaking of “performance,” this is our third year sponsoring the Under the Radar (UTR) conference and marks the second year that our CMO, Jeffrey Samuels, being a judge there. This year, Jeff will be on the panel for the Performance Monitoring session. Here are the companies presenting in this session:

  • Fabric Engine – lets developers write high-performance application using dynamic languages
  • Iron.io – provides elastic products for cloud messaging and background processing
  • Sumo Logic – gives real-time Big Data and IT insights of log intelligence and analytics
  • Tracelytics – provides insights into the performance of web applications

(more…) «Revving Up Your Engines in the Cloud – Performance Counts! GoGrid Judging at Under the Radar 2012»

Speeding Things Up in the Cloud with NGINX

Monday, March 26th, 2012 by

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It’s been no secret to us in the high-performance, web server in-crowd that NGINX (pronounced “engine-x”) has been taking the webhosting world by storm for the last several years; *sites like WordPress, Facebook, Hulu, Github, SourceForge and more have been offloading some or many functions onto NGINX. I had originally been exposed to NGINX whilst researching for a higher-performance web server that was 64-bit friendlier than Apache, and that was did not use single threads. Apache has an enormous memory footprint on 64-bit systems and is a single-threaded application.

NGINX is a very flexible HTTP server that can also serve as a reverse proxy, load balancer, caching server, and an IMAP/POP3 proxy. Unlike Apache, however, the configuration is a little bit more involved and can be a big change for Apache loyalists.

In this is example, NGINX will be configured as a full webserver with PHP support. My goal when conjuring this project was to make a pre-configured Community GSI on the GoGrid Exchange with as little modification as possible to ensure a “pure” environment. If you’re anything like me, you might tremble at the thought of even using a typical, pre-configured server with a LAMP stack; I personally like setting things up from scratch, but there’ve been plenty of situations where I would’ve preferred a pre-configured solution. Hopefully I can capture the essence of my intentions.

One thing I should note before I get started is that NGINX does not have a module for PHP the way Apache does; PHP must be run using the FastCGI methodology. Much like the way you would pass requests to a Java container or reverse proxy, so must we for PHP.

The first thing I should mention is that I’m using the EPEL and IUS repositories to for the latest versions of NGINX and PHP-FPM. IUS is the official repository for RHEL/CentOS as referenced by PHP.net. Using these 2 repositories will not alter any existing packages on your system.

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GoGrid’s Network Performance Beats IaaS Competition – CloudSleuth Report

Wednesday, October 12th, 2011 by

For the past 12 months, CloudSleuth, a service provided by Compuware, has been pulling in millions of network performance data points in order to compile a report that compares the network performance of leading cloud providers. A sample of the report results is shown below and more details can be found on the CloudSleuth’s blog post. We commend Compuware for taking a leadership role in providing these necessary benchmarks and reports of the cloud space as this type of 3rd party, independent analysis is extremely useful and helpful to those shopping for the right cloud to support their business.

At GoGrid, our technology stack is not simply around infrastructure devices like servers, firewalls, storage and load balancers. We also view Operating System choice, horizontal & vertical scalability, CPU and I/O performance, our partner ecosystem, our image management and deployment systems, and yes, network management, availability and performance as well. By doing just a bit of research, you will see that cloud providers vary greatly in what they can or cannot offer and how well they do it.

It is significant to note that this performance study ranks all types of cloud service providers juxtaposed together — PaaS, IaaS and even VMware shops. We call this out because there are definite distinctions between types of cloud (see Cloud Pyramid below). As we use this important data to better educate our customers and prospects, there was an interesting fact that bubbled up – if you segment and categorize the results, GoGrid’s network led the IaaS category.

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(Note: categorization of PaaS/IaaS added by GoGrid)

Compuware mapped out its benchmarking strategy to measure the differences in network performance of these leading clouds. The Compuware team pulled statistics from 25 providers from different presences around the globe (as part of the Gomez Performance Network). The results are interesting, to say the least, especially since the analysis clearly indicates that GoGrid’s US EAST data center was the best performing within main IaaS providers (e.g., Amazon, Rackspace and others).

(more…) «GoGrid’s Network Performance Beats IaaS Competition – CloudSleuth Report»

Happy World IPv6 Day – Wait, What the Heck is IPv6? A Lot of Digits, That’s For Sure!

Wednesday, June 8th, 2011 by

Today, June 8th, is World IPv6 Day. What does that mean exactly? Well, the internet is running out of IPv4 addresses and today, some companies around the world are testing out their sites using IPv6, a networking protocol that aims to replace IPv4 in the coming years. So, today is the day to raise awareness of IPv6. It’s NOT a transition day – the transition will take years to accomplish – it IS a time to evaluate your IPv6-readiness on your sites, applications, hardware, software or anything that uses IP addressing protocols.

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IPv4 Networking Protocol

IPv4 is a networking address space that most of us should be familiar with. It is a numeric, 32-bit only, and takes the form of XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX (so like 192.168.100.000). There is a physical limitation to the number of IPv4 addresses you can have, 2^32 or 4,294,967,296 to be exact, and we are running out pretty quickly. Every website has an IP address bound to it. We, as consumers, are used to typing in domain names (like www.GoGrid.com). But what happens is that the domain name is translated into an IPv4 address (like 216.93.160.144). Think of IP addresses like an “internet phone number”. Nowadays, we click on a name (e.g., a domain name) to call someone. In the past, we dialed a phone number (e.g., an IP address).

Remember, not all of those combinations can be used as some are reserved:

Reserved address blocks
CIDR address block Description Reference
0.0.0.0/8 Current network (only valid as source address) RFC 1700
10.0.0.0/8 Private network RFC 1918
127.0.0.0/8 Loopback RFC 5735
169.254.0.0/16 Link-Local RFC 3927
172.16.0.0/12 Private network RFC 1918
192.0.0.0/24 Reserved (IANA) RFC 5735
192.0.2.0/24 TEST-NET-1, Documentation and example code RFC 5735
192.88.99.0/24 IPv6 to IPv4 relay RFC 3068
192.168.0.0/16 Private network RFC 1918
198.18.0.0/15 Network benchmark tests RFC 2544
198.51.100.0/24 TEST-NET-2, Documentation and examples RFC 5737
203.0.113.0/24 TEST-NET-3, Documentation and examples RFC 5737
224.0.0.0/4 Multicasts (former Class D network) RFC 3171
240.0.0.0/4 Reserved (former Class E network) RFC 1700
255.255.255.255 Broadcast RFC 919

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