Posts Tagged ‘MySQL’

 

How to Install LAMP, Webmin & ConfigServer Security & Firewall on a CentOS 6.0 GoGrid Cloud Server

Thursday, July 19th, 2012 by

Let me preface this post by saying, I am NOT a Linux guru. In fact, I consider myself to be a newbie when it comes to the intricacies of Linux. I probably know enough to be dangerous, at least dangerous to the server. So, I’m writing this post with the following disclaimer: Don’t ask me for any details on the “why” or how to do what I’m outlining below differently. But since I figured that lots of you are like me, I wanted to share.

Since I’m a Linux newbie, you’ll probably understand why I wanted to write this post though. I’m not a command line junkie—GUIs are much more my thing. But when it comes to running a server that is speedy and high performance with low overhead (e.g., doing away with GUIs), you’re probably looking at various Linux distros. What I wanted to do was set up a basic Linux system running a LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL, and PHP) stack that also had a web-interface and some added security controls.

The great thing about doing this type of experimentation in the cloud is that I can create essentially a Dev & Test environment where I can spin up a server in minutes, install software, configure it, and test everything out. Then if it doesn’t work the way I want it to, I can tear it down and start again from scratch. The cloud lets you do this quickly, easily, and inexpensively.

In this tutorial, you can basically have the entire configuration up and running in the GoGrid cloud in less than an hour and only spend about $0.25 to test this out (assumes a 2 GB server running for 1 hour at $0.12/GB RAM/hr.)

Here’s what we’re using:

  • CentOS 6.0 (64-bit) – with 2 GB RAM
  • Webmin – web-based interface for sysadmins for UNIX that lets users set up user accounts, Apache, DNS, file sharing, and a whole lot more
  • ConfigServer Firewall & Security (CFS) – a Stateful Packet Inspection (SPI) firewall, login/intrusion detection, and security application for Linux servers

(more…) «How to Install LAMP, Webmin & ConfigServer Security & Firewall on a CentOS 6.0 GoGrid Cloud Server»

The Big Data Revolution – Part 2 – Enter the Cloud

Wednesday, March 21st, 2012 by

In Part 1 of this Big Data series, I provided a background on the origins of Big Data.

But What is Big Data?

Port Vell Barcelona

The problem with using the term “Big Data” is that it’s used in a lot of different ways. One definition is that Big Data is any data set that is too large for on-hand data management tools. According to Martin Wattenberg, a scientist at IBM, “The real yardstick … is how it [Big Data] compares with a natural human limit, like the sum total of all the words that you’ll hear in your lifetime.” Collecting that data is a solvable problem, but making sense of it, (particularly in real time), is the challenge that technology tries to solve. This new type of technology is often listed under the title of “NoSQL” and includes distributed databases that are a departure from relational databases like Oracle and MySQL. These are systems that are specifically designed to be able to parallelize compute, distribute data, and create fault tolerance on a large cluster of servers. Some examples of NoSQL projects and software are: Hadoop, Cassandra, MongoDB, Riak and Membase.

The techniques vary, but there is a definite distinction between SQL relational databases and their NoSQL brethren. Most notably, NoSQL systems share the following characteristics:

  • Do not use SQL as their primary query language
  • May not require fixed table schemas
  • May not give full ACID guarantees (Atomicity, Consistency, Isolation, Durability)
  • Scale horizontally

Because of the lack of ACID, NoSQL is used when performance and real-time results are more important than consistency. For example, if a company wants to update their website in real time based on an analysis of the behaviors of a particular user interaction with the site, they will most likely turn to NoSQL to solve this use case.

However, this does not mean that relational databases are going away. In fact, it is likely that in larger implementations, NoSQL and SQL will function together. Just as NoSQL was designed to solve a particular use case, so do relational databases solve theirs. Relational databases excel at organizing structured data and is the standard for serving up ad-hoc analytics and business intelligence reporting. In fact, Apache Hadoop even has a separate project called Sqoop that is designed to link Hadoop with structured data stores. Most likely, those who implement NoSQL will maintain their relational databases for legacy systems and for reporting off of their NosQL clusters.

(more…) «The Big Data Revolution – Part 2 – Enter the Cloud»

The Big Data Revolution – Part 1 – The Origins

Tuesday, March 20th, 2012 by

data-security

For many years, companies collected data from various sources that often found its way to relational databases like Oracle and MySQL. However, the rise of the internet and Web 2.0, and recently social media began not only an enormous increase in the amount of data created, but also in the type of data. No longer was data relegated to types that easily fit into standard data fields – it now came in the form of photos, geographic information, chats, Twitter feeds and emails. The age of Big Data is upon us.

A study by IDC titled “The Digital Universe Decade” projects a 45-fold increase in annual data by 2020. In 2010, the amount of digital information was 1.2 zettabytes. 1 zettabyte equals 1 trillion gigabytes. To put that in perspective, the equivalent of 1.2 zettabytes is a full-length episode of “24” running continuously for 125 million years, according to IDC. That’s a lot of data. More importantly, this data has to go somewhere, and this report projects that by 2020, more than 1/3 of all digital information created annually will either live in or pass through the cloud. With all this data being created, the challenge will be to collect, store, and analyze what it all means.

Business intelligence (BI) systems have always had to deal with large data sets. Typically the strategy was to pull in “atomic” -level data at the lowest level of granularity, then aggregate the information to a consumable format for end users. In fact, it was preferable to have a lot of data since you could also “drill-down” from the aggregation layer to get at the more detailed information, as needed.

Large Data Sets and Sampling

Coming from a data background, I find that dealing with large data sets is both a blessing and a curse. One product that I managed analyzed share of wireless numbers. The number of wireless subscribers in 2011 according to CTIA was 322.9 million and growing. While that doesn’t seem like a lot of data at first, if each wireless number was a unique identifier, there could be any number of activities associated with each number. Therefore the amount of information generated from each number could be extensive, especially as the key element was seeing changes over time. For example, after 2003, mobile subscribers in the United States were able to port their numbers from one carrier to another. This is of great importance to market research since a shift from one carrier to another would indicate churn and also impact the market share of carriers in that Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA).

Given that it would take a significant amount of resources to poll every household in the United States, market researchers often employ a technique called sampling. This is a statistical technique where a panel that represents the population is used to represent the activity of the overall population that you want to measure. This is a sound scientific technique if done correctly but its not without its perils. For example, it’s often possible to get +/- 1% error at 95% confidence for a large population but what happens once you start drilling down into more specific demographics and geographies? The risk is not only having enough sample (you can’t just have one subscriber represent the activity of a large group for example) but also ensuring that it is representative (is the subscriber that you are measuring representative of the population that you want to measure?). It’s a classic problem of using panelists that sampling errors do occur. It’s fairly difficult to be completely certain that your sample is representative unless you’ve actually measured the entire population already (using it as a baseline) but if you’ve already done that, why bother sampling?

(more…) «The Big Data Revolution – Part 1 – The Origins»

Learn How a GoGrid Customer Created a Multiple Data Center Routing & Failover Infrastructure Environment

Tuesday, March 22nd, 2011 by

We absolutely LOVE hearing how GoGrid customers are using our cloud solutions to create unique “cloud fingerprints” and environments using the features and data centers of GoGrid. Paul Trippett just published a very interesting write-up of an infrastructure environment that addresses many of the common concerns facing any company looking to provide a highly-redundant infrastructure while also ensuring a solid Service Level Agreement (SLA) for their customers.

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You can find Paul’s original write-up titled “Utilizing GoGrid’s Multiple Data Centers for Routing and Failover” on his site. With his permission, we have reposted the article so that others can learn, mimic and build upon his unique scenario.

At the beginning of the year one of our customers asked us if we can provide an SLA for StormRETS and with it, the sound gritting teeth suddenly echoed around the room. As you can imagine, this caused more questions than which we actually had answers for:

blockquote_2 What kind of SLA did we want to provide and what could we realistically provide?

Our hosting provider, at the time, had an SLA which entailed “We don’t give any guarantee that your servers will be available, but if for any reason they are unavailable we will get the back up and running as soon as we can.”, erm, how on earth can we build a SLA based on that. It was decided at this time we would migrate our servers to another hosting provider, one at least with a SLA we can build on and a company we can actually contact directly should a problem arise.

(more…) «Learn How a GoGrid Customer Created a Multiple Data Center Routing & Failover Infrastructure Environment»

The Easiest Way to Build, Publish & Host Websites – Microsoft WebMatrix & GoGrid

Tuesday, August 24th, 2010 by

Recently, Microsoft announced WebMatrix, a free Web development suite of software and tools that bring together a Web Server, a database and programming frameworks all within a single, integrated solution. WebMatrix allows you to code, test and deploy ASP.NET and PHP applications, all within the same environment. What does this have to do with GoGrid you might ask? Well it’s pretty simple actually, once you have developed your application locally on your PC’s desktop, you will need an easy way to copy it over and show to the world. GoGrid has worked with Microsoft to create a seamless publishing and hosting experience practically effortless.

To make it easy for new GoGrid users, we are offering a $150 GoGrid service credit for you to get started with Microsoft WebMatrix and GoGrid. To get going, simply sign-up here.

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About WebMatrix (and a bit of GoGrid)

Microsoft does a clear job outlining the features of WebMatrix, specifically:

  • Small, but complete package – simply download and install WebMatrix for free on your desktop. From there, you can immediately start to use the built-in webserver, database and programming framework to jump-start your web-development. And, you can quickly get started on the hosting side of things as well by deploying a GoGrid server that is ready to automatically connect to WebMatrix.
  • Grows with you – you start simple and then grow as your application and development grows, much like that of Cloud Computing. As your coding expands, you can easily integrate Visual Studio into your work environment. Similarly, you can update the built-in database from SQL Server Compact to a full-blown Microsoft SQL Server.
  • Start > Open Source – if you aren’t ready to start from scratch, WebMatrix includes a variety of popular and free open source applications like WordPress, Joomla!, Umbraco and DotNetNuke. Just choose your software package from the library and WebMatrix will download and install the software. And you can tweak each environment using the built-in code editor.
  • Database made simple – don’t let data-driven websites scare you either. If your web application needs to serve data like a online catalog or CMS, WebMatrix has you covered by providing a small, embedded database (SQL Server Compact). But the really nice thing is, once you are done doing all of the development on your Desktop, you can publish your database quickly and easily to your GoGrid production environment.
  • Elegant interface, simple experience – WebMatrix has editors galore! It includes a rich code editor and database editor, but also has easy management consoles for SEO, web server management and FTP publishing as well. Couple this management with the ease of use of the GoGrid portal and you can’t go wrong.
  • Simple to code – at GoGrid, we have always believed in adhering to industry standards when it comes to hosting and managing infrastructure. WebMatrix follows a similar suit by sticking to HTML, CSS & JavaScript standards. Your code is easy to read and by using the software suite, you can do some learning in the process as you create your next web application.
  • More than “Hello, World” – WebMatrix has a variety of built-in code helpers that make development even easier by simply tagging your HTML.
  • Desktop or server, it’s all the same – moving from a desktop development environment to a full-fledged production environment is practically effortless since the Desktop version is built with the same frameworks, web server and database engine as production servers.
  • Tightly knit, fully integrated – WebMatrix also acts as the “traffic cop” because of its integration with IIS Developer Express and other Web server components that run your site. You can monitor things in real-time and if an issue pops up, it helps you to track down and resolve that issue.
  • Optimized for search – you no longer need to pay a 3rd party to ensure that your website or application is SEO optimized. Built in guides assist you in optimizing your site to the fullest.
  • Site publication – once you are ready to move your web site or application to a robust production environment, WebMatrix can help in that selection process. But you may not even need that since GoGrid has partnered with Microsoft to provide a full production-ready environment within the GoGrid cloud. And, we are giving new GoGrid users a $150 service credit to make that on-ramp even faster!

(more…) «The Easiest Way to Build, Publish & Host Websites – Microsoft WebMatrix & GoGrid»