Posts Tagged ‘load balance’

 

How To Set Up High Availability Web Applications in the Cloud using GoGrid

Tuesday, April 14th, 2009 by

Web Applications like WordPress, Drupal, Joomla, SugarCRM and others are all the rage and have been for quite a while. The huge availability of Open Source applications, typically based on Linux, Apache, mySQL and PHP (LAMP stacks) that you can find in SourceForge or other repositories, makes the implementation of powerful web-based solutions a snap. Once you find the web application of your dreams, the next step is finding a hosting provider. There are many VPS (Virtual Private Server) hosting providers that offer shared hosting at pennies on the dollar. But with those VPS solutions, you are left with exactly that, a “shared” environment. So, if someone else on your shared server is running bad scripts or code that sucks up resources on your server, you are affected with little or no recourse to resolve other than to complain, moan or move to a different provider.

So, as you grow (or as your service deteriorates due to the resource-sucking of others on your shared box), you are left with a decision of what to do next. Many people choose the most obvious upgrade path of leasing a dedicated server (e.g., at ServePath, we offer dedicated, managed hosting) or colocating (where you bring your own hardware and a hosting provider like Coloserve leases space, power, cooling, security and bandwidth). But now, you have another option that truly fits the model of delivering scalable web hosting…put in in the Cloud, with GoGrid, for example.

Recently I helped map out the implementation of a secure, redundant, load-balanced web application in the Cloud using GoGrid.

Original Setup

A client originally set up the following implementation of a WordPress blog on GoGrid:

Understanding your New GoGrid Account

Monday, March 17th, 2008 by

For those of you who have already signed up for a Trial or Paid GoGrid account, WELCOME! For those who have not, WHAT ARE YOU WAITING FOR? As many of you have already started using GoGrid for a variety of purposes, I felt that it might make some sense to provide some more information and clarification about your new service.

As always, please feel free to contact us should we need to clarify anything, to simply suggest some new or improved feature or to just RAVE about GoGrid in general.

For starters, I definitely recommend reading through the FAQ section of the GoGrid site as there are some answers to your questions there. You can get information on:

  • How to access and update your account
  • Change your billing information
  • Learn about the fundamentals of administering your account and servers
  • …And much more!

However, if you are like me, frequently you pass over all of the “Welcome” emails that you receive when you sign up for things. So, for those of you who have GoGrid accounts, here is a refresher; for those of you who do not, here is what you are missing.

What is the fastest way to get up and running? (more…) «Understanding your New GoGrid Account»

GoGrid Public Beta – Explore the Technology

Tuesday, March 11th, 2008 by

Does the picture below look blurry to you?

GoGrid_portal_blur_small

It shouldn’t any more. You now have the ability to kick the tires, pop the hood and take GoGrid for a test ride. Just head on over to your local GoGrid dealership (that would be us) and sign up for a Trial Account.

I have been writing about GoGrid for a few months now, both on this blog and on others. After almost two years of development, we are launching GoGrid to the general public. While you probably shouldn’t, at this point, host your mission critical servers on GoGrid yet (e.g., NORAD should probably hold off on hosting any Launch Command servers for a while), you SHOULD feel free to set up test environments, Quality Assurance servers, rollover backup servers, and demo servers on GoGrid. That is the nature of beta software, good enough for prime time, great enough to understand how the technology can help your business thrive and grow, helping you plan for the future.

There are several plans that you can choose from when signing up:

  • Pay As You Go – Pay only for what you use
  • Business Grid – Good for businesses looking to offload a few servers for a good cost-savings
  • Advanced Grid – Better for larger computational networks and Internet development platforms
  • Enterprise Grid – Best for enterprises hoping to quickly scale or set up failover environments

There are also several server images you can choose from at the launch (with many more being added soon):