Posts Tagged ‘infrastructure as a service’

 

SMB Decision-Makers Have Varying Cloud Demands

Friday, December 14th, 2012 by

Small and medium-sized businesses (SMBs) are doing everything in their power to gain a competitive advantage over rival enterprises that often have more exhaustible resources. In many cases, SMBs are adopting cloud computing services to achieve these goals, as the technology is now well known for its ability to reduce costs and drive innovation.

A recent report by Spiceworks highlighted the growing trend among SMBs to migrate to the cloud, noting that 36 percent of SMBs are already using cloud servers. Another 9 percent said they plan to be using the cloud within a year, while another 28 percent of SMB decision-makers are actively looking for the right provider and services to cater to specific needs.

SMB decision-makers have varying cloud demands

To complicate matters for cloud vendors, not all SMBs are looking for the same thing. While the majority of companies require a highly scalable environment that is capable of supporting high-volume and long-term storage at an affordable cost, each executive has his or her own specific demands. As a result, Spiceworks narrowed down the list to five specific categories that most cloud users fall into.

The ‘nuts and bolts’ buyer
These individuals are usually the nitty gritty decision-makers that ensure the cloud solutions are functional and within a specific budget, Spiceworks noted. In many cases, these executives will ask questions about monthly expenses, maintenance costs and other practical financial questions in regard to specific services and applications.

The defensive purchaser
While getting down to the fine financial points is important, many organizations need to ensure cloud environments support a firm’s ability to meet compliance requirements. For this reason, some decision-makers are classified as the “CYA” buyers, as they are more focused on asking providers questions regarding data protection, audit support and other security aspects, Spiceworks noted. In general, cloud computing environments are highly secure, as this is a major competitive point for vendors, InfoWorld said in another report.

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Riding the Gartner Hype Cycle Roller Coaster: Hang on to your Magic Quadrants!

Wednesday, November 28th, 2012 by

Every year, vendors and companies watch to see how providers are positioned in Gartner’s Magic Quadrants. Gartner has been providing Magic Quadrant analysis for many years in different industry verticals, and although the analysis isn’t necessarily the gold standard, it does help those making buying decisions understand each industry a little more clearly.

Since 2009, GoGrid has been in a Gartner Magic Quadrant, and this year we’re happy to announce our inclusion in the 2012 Cloud IaaS Magic Quadrant. Instead of analyzing the comments and positioning of the cloud infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) providers, I wanted to take a different approach by focusing on how the Magic Quadrant has evolved over the years in relation to cloud computing, hosting, and IaaS in general.

What’s all the “hype” about?

Many of you may be familiar with another Gartner graphic and report called the “Hype Cycle.” The Hype Cycle graphically represents the evolution of a new technology from its introduction through its maturity. The Cycle is broken into five distinct “slopes,” and looks like this:

Gartner_Hype_Cycle.svg

  • The Technology Trigger phase is where a breakthrough or new technology first begins to garner interest.
  • The Peak of Inflated Expectations is the phase where a technology is seen as the solution to all ills. At this point, the technology is pushed to the limit, with some successes and plenty of failures. There’s a lot of media, marketing, and PR hype during this phase, as its name implies.
  • Once reality sets in, the technology enters the Trough of Disillusionment. In this phase, there isn’t as much media interest and there’s possibly more criticism than praise.
  • As the technology begins to mature and users continue to experiment and innovate, we reach a level of clairvoyance where potential risks and benefits are clearer and there are more solutions that use the technology. This phase is the Slope of Enlightenment.
  • When real-world applications appear and are accepted and the value proposition gains traction, the technology hits the Plateau of Productivity, where more widespread adoption occurs. Once the technology reaches this level, it has become established and viable.

Like many transforming technologies before it, cloud computing is working its way through this Hype Cycle roller coaster. Five years ago, the cloud was chugging up the hill to get ready for the ride, and more recently, it’s sped down the descent as the technology gained momentum. Where does it stand currently? There are many opinions, of course, but I believe we’re enjoying the ride to the Plateau of Productivity. (more…) «Riding the Gartner Hype Cycle Roller Coaster: Hang on to your Magic Quadrants!»

Video: Interview with Izoox Co-Founder on Successes Using the GoGrid Cloud

Wednesday, May 23rd, 2012 by

Cloud computing provides all different types of solutions to businesses across the globe. And each solution is unique, especially if carefully crafted to fill a niche. At GoGrid, we love how our customers use our infrastructure in compelling ways, especially when the value that they receive is passed on to their clients.

izoox-logo

One such company is Izoox who came to GoGrid a few years ago in search of a way to add value to their hosting and website management services that they provide to their customers. But sometimes that journey to find the perfect infrastructure solution can be challenging. Izoox, in fact, tested over 60 different providers over a course of 5 years – even having to endure outages where they were put at the end of a queue for support because they weren’t “big” enough. For Izoox, this was unacceptable and they were finding that their customers were suffering and they had to find a cloud infrastructure provider who could not only perform, but could also work hand-in-hand with them to craft the best solution for their needs.

Download the full Izoox Case Study here.

izoox-network-diagram-530w

The Interview

A few months ago, I had the pleasure of interviewing Matthew Scalf, co-owner & co-founder of Izoox to discuss his journey, his pain points along the way, and how he eventually settled on GoGrid as his primary cloud infrastructure partner.

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Speeding Things Up in the Cloud with NGINX

Monday, March 26th, 2012 by

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It’s been no secret to us in the high-performance, web server in-crowd that NGINX (pronounced “engine-x”) has been taking the webhosting world by storm for the last several years; *sites like WordPress, Facebook, Hulu, Github, SourceForge and more have been offloading some or many functions onto NGINX. I had originally been exposed to NGINX whilst researching for a higher-performance web server that was 64-bit friendlier than Apache, and that was did not use single threads. Apache has an enormous memory footprint on 64-bit systems and is a single-threaded application.

NGINX is a very flexible HTTP server that can also serve as a reverse proxy, load balancer, caching server, and an IMAP/POP3 proxy. Unlike Apache, however, the configuration is a little bit more involved and can be a big change for Apache loyalists.

In this is example, NGINX will be configured as a full webserver with PHP support. My goal when conjuring this project was to make a pre-configured Community GSI on the GoGrid Exchange with as little modification as possible to ensure a “pure” environment. If you’re anything like me, you might tremble at the thought of even using a typical, pre-configured server with a LAMP stack; I personally like setting things up from scratch, but there’ve been plenty of situations where I would’ve preferred a pre-configured solution. Hopefully I can capture the essence of my intentions.

One thing I should note before I get started is that NGINX does not have a module for PHP the way Apache does; PHP must be run using the FastCGI methodology. Much like the way you would pass requests to a Java container or reverse proxy, so must we for PHP.

The first thing I should mention is that I’m using the EPEL and IUS repositories to for the latest versions of NGINX and PHP-FPM. IUS is the official repository for RHEL/CentOS as referenced by PHP.net. Using these 2 repositories will not alter any existing packages on your system.

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How to Predict Elastic Cloud Computing Costs for Your Organization

Tuesday, March 6th, 2012 by

Every day I talk with customers about the benefits of cloud computing—everything from faster provisioning of resources, to reduced management overhead, to flexible workload management. The benefits are becoming well-known; however, when it comes to managing an IT budget, these benefits can also present a challenge. Unlike virtual compute, network, and storage resources, budgets aren’t elastic. Your company’s CFO doesn’t want to see that your nimble IT organization is spending $100 today and $1,000 tomorrow. He doesn’t care that you’ve matched IT resources to your customer’s demand curve. No my friend, what your CFO wants is predictability. Fortunately for you, that’s a challenge we’ve solved with our improved plan pricing for cloud servers.

To demonstrate how this new plan works, let’s build a simple model where your usage changes from one month to the next. In month 1, you need three servers for 400 hours, one server for 80 hours, and two servers for the entire month. For simplicity’s sake, we’ll assume all servers are 1 GB and 1 core. Using Pay-As-You-Go pricing, this configuration of servers on GoGrid would cost you $0.12 for each hour an individual server is running. The math for the first month’s configuration looks like this:

3 X 1 GB server x 400 hours = 1,200 hours used
1 x 1 GB server x 80 hours = 80 hours used
2 x 1 GB server x 730 hours = 1,460 hours used

The total hours used for all servers = 2,740 hours at a rate of $.12 per hour.

Total Pay-As-You-Go cost for month 1 = $328.80.

PayAsYouGo-Cloud

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