Posts Tagged ‘Industry’

 

Is Your High-Tech Company Ready For An SDN-Enabled Cloud?

Thursday, April 18th, 2013 by

When it comes to technology, there are many companies on the “bleeding edge” these days. Sometimes these companies achieve greatness by being visionary, producing products or services that others haven’t thought of, or investing heavily in R&D. But they all have one thing in common: They use the latest high-tech, innovative solutions to power their journeys.

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When it comes to the underlying infrastructure powering a technology-oriented company, “cutting edge” means success. Sites and services need to perform, be reliable, be resilient, and have the flexibility to expand and contract based on the ebb and flow of day-to-day business. For me, that means cloud infrastructure is the best solution for companies looking to stay ahead of the curve.

Over the past few months, GoGrid has released a variety of services and features designed to give companies a leg up on the competition. It’s all centered on providing cloud infrastructure that’s flexible, yet forward-thinking. It’s much more than simply needing faster and bigger clouds—it’s about architecting our cloud solutions to provide customers with a highly available and distributed set of infrastructure components. And it’s architected according to software-defined networking (SDN) concepts.

SDN architecture isn’t focused on internetworked commodity hardware or new ways to provide networking services. It’s designed to distribute a variety of formerly hardware-based solutions across nodes, data centers, and clouds. When you think about “old school” infrastructure architecture, you probably think of physical devices. And if you think about one device, you really need to think about two, for redundancy and backup. If your hardware load balancer or firewall fails, you have to be sure you have a warm or hot standby available to immediately take its place. That requires time and money. And if you want to be cutting edge, you don’t want to be spending your precious time and money planning for the inevitable. You want to be innovating and iterating.

That’s where SDN is truly powerful and why many of the leading technology companies are adopting solutions that use it. With SDN, you can build in fault tolerance and redundancy. Take our recently released Dynamic Load Balancers as an example. Instead of relying on a single hardware device for routing traffic between available servers, our Dynamic Load Balancers are distributed and highly available across our Public Cloud. If one of the Dynamic Load Balancers fails, another instance, complete with configurations, is spawned immediately elsewhere thanks to our self-healing design. And these load-balancing services can be controlled programmatically via our API.

This month we announced another service that operates in the same distributed manner, our Firewall Service. Although many companies choose to use Cisco ASAs as a security front end for their cloud and physical infrastructure environments (an offering we also provide), these are physical devices that require management. However, our SDN architecture lets us provide more resilient and creative solutions. Like our Dynamic Load Balancers, our Firewall Service is built around SDN concepts and distributed across nodes and our data centers. When you create a security group (that has policies assigned to it), it’s automatically replicated across all our data centers within seconds. If you have distributed infrastructure, you can simply assign a security group to any similarly configured Cloud Server, regardless of that server’s location. If you subsequently change a policy, it’s automatically synchronized to all servers across all data centers that are part of that security group. In other words, you configure once, assign the security group to the server(s), and then watch the SDN magic happen.

(more…) «Is Your High-Tech Company Ready For An SDN-Enabled Cloud?»

3 Steps to Building a Healthy Cloud Partnership

Monday, March 4th, 2013 by

Implementing public cloud computing is quickly becoming a top priority for companies of all sizes and industries, as the technology enables employees to be more efficient and flexible – both of which are crucial in today’s highly competitive private sector. Because the public cloud is managed off-site, decision-makers need to find the right provider with services that will meet short- and long-term demands. Equally as important is developing a healthy cloud partnership.

TechTarget recently highlighted several ways to develop a strong partner program with a cloud vendor, as doing so will ensure a firm is given the best opportunity to succeed in the coming years. This growing demand for a robust relationship between the user and provider has forced many cloud companies to reevaluate their business models and create more relevant offerings.

3 steps to develop a healthy cloud relationship

3 steps to develop a healthy cloud relationship

Because cloud vendors come from a variety of backgrounds and offer myriad solutions, they need to find unique ways to differentiate themselves from other providers, TechTarget noted. Doing so will make certain services more appealing to companies and support healthy collaboration between the two parties.

“Every partner is slightly different,” cloud expert Jaywant Rao said, according to TechTarget. “They each have a different flavor of how they go to market. That means you have to focus on which models make sense for your own business and align things from there.”

Step 1: Decision-makers must identify objectives
Finding a service provider to meet corporate demands means executives must know what they intend to get out of the cloud. To do so, organizations should consider building a channel program that clearly defines the image of the perfect partner, TechTarget noted.

(more…) «3 Steps to Building a Healthy Cloud Partnership»

GoGrid Cloud Survey Report – The Importance of Private Clouds (Part 5)

Monday, July 25th, 2011 by

As you may recall, at the beginning of 2011 we polled over 500 CTOs, developers and IT professionals asking them about various aspects of cloud computing. Questions included: What is cloud computing and how do you use it?, What security measures do you require in the cloud? and many more. The data from this cloud survey report provides a good idea of the current cloud computing landscape and upcoming trends as we race towards 2012.

Continuing on in the series, we wanted to know what IT professionals thought of cloud computing’s latest innovation: the private cloud. Private clouds have quickly become the topic of much conversation in the industry because they offer core public cloud technology but within a single-tenant environment. Before we jump into the results of our question, What aspects of the private cloud are most important to your organization?, it is important to have a clear understanding of what private clouds are.

What are private clouds?

There are quite a few ways how private clouds differ from public cloud offerings but I won’t go into all of the differences within this post. As I mentioned above, there is the idea of tenancy. To broadly generalize, public clouds are multi-tenant and private clouds are single-tenant. To expand on this concept a bit more, public clouds provide shared resources for consumption by multiple companies or organizations within the same server cluster. However, these resources are dedicated and fully isolated to those users in that networking, storage, RAM and CPU units are allocated to those users. This is very different than traditional shared hosting or VPS’s (Virtual Private Servers) – shared or VPS environments can, at times, suffer from over-allocation of resources or degraded performance if one user on a particular “machine” is “hogging” those resources. Public clouds effectively isolate those resources so that customers don’t experience usage hogs.

Private clouds are essentially public clouds but in an environment dedicated to one company, thus “single-tenant.” That does not mean though, that a private cloud cannot host multiple departments or business units from that single organization. Basically, a private cloud dedicates all of the resources to a single company or corporation and serves just that organization. The computer, storage and networking resources are most likely either owned by that organization, hosted by that organization or running exclusively for that organization but managed by another vendor (see GoGrid’s Hosted Private Cloud).

Private clouds frequently come at a higher cost than traditional public clouds mainly because public clouds give you economies of scale via larger infrastructure installations. Some companies may prefer operating in a non-shared environment due the higher amounts of control that they have on the infrastructure and the hardware or due to compliance or regulatory concerns.

(more…) «GoGrid Cloud Survey Report – The Importance of Private Clouds (Part 5)»

GoGrid Cloud Survey Report – Security & Compliance (Part 4)

Tuesday, June 21st, 2011 by

Last time in the GoGrid Cloud Survey Report series, I wrote on cloud use cases and reasons for migrating to the cloud. This week, I wanted to focus on everybody’s favorite topic: security and compliance in the cloud. ;-)

If you’re brand new to this series, let me catch you up to speed. At the beginning of the year, GoGrid gathered feedback from over 500 CTOs, developers and IT professionals relating to cloud computing and best practices. This week, we’re highlighting the results from the question “What type of security/compliance do you require in the cloud?

You may have noticed, whenever there is a conversation about Infrastructure-as-a-Service, the security debate is sure to follow. We wanted to see what types of security the IT industry uses and which were the most important to maintaining compliance.

What Type of Security/Compliance Do You Require in the Cloud?

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As seen in the chart above, private VLANs, network layer firewalls and DDoS mitigation are the most required form of security according to our respondents, followed closely by Virtual Private Networks.

(more…) «GoGrid Cloud Survey Report – Security & Compliance (Part 4)»

The Actual Truth About the Economics of Cloud Computing

Thursday, May 26th, 2011 by

Don’t let the media fool you. Which of these actually make cloud computing financially compelling?

  1. Super cheap power, such as hydro-electric
  2. Shipping container datacenters
  3. Massive datacenters
  4. Blade servers
  5. Datacenters with super-efficient cooling
  6. VMware virtualization licenses
  7. Pay-as-you-go pricing
  8. Automation
  9. Shared platforms
  10. Commodity hardware

The answer is NOT “all of the above”! If you said “pay-as-you-go pricing, automation, shared platforms, and commodity hardware” then you win. In fact, these four concepts are so powerful that I believe that they will shrink the entire IT economy. IT shrinking? How could that be possible? Yes, I think that the $3.3 trillion dollar global IT economy could be cut in half. When I’ve made this declaration before I’ve been likened to the commissioner of the US Patent Office who was rumored to have said:

“Everything that can be invented has been invented.”

Charles H. Duell, Commissioner, U.S. patent office, 1899 (attributed)

In truth he didn’t say this. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_H._Duell

But I’m still saying that I think we’re currently seeing the peak of complexity and cost in IT. IT is going to get easier and less expensive from this point forward. There. You have it in writing. (more…) «The Actual Truth About the Economics of Cloud Computing»