Posts Tagged ‘IaaS’

 

The Top 3 Private Networking Use Cases for CloudLink

Tuesday, April 2nd, 2013 by

Public clouds are fantastic for a majority of infrastructure use cases. And interconnectivity between clouds enables myriad solutions to empower businesses to have multiple synchronized points of presence across the world. Companies can easily set up connections that traverse the public Internet as a means to transmit and potentially synchronize data between cloud data centers. But these connections need to be reliable and more often than not, private.

CloudLink private network between cloud data centers

CloudLink private network between cloud data centers

With public network connections between clouds, users are at the mercy of hops and latency. For example, data may take one route with a particular number of hops, and a second later, may follow a completely different path and take a longer or shorter amount of time based on the connection.

In terms of securing the transport, some companies rely on point-to-point VPN connections using a hardware or software solution or some combination of the two. However, these solutions are also constrained by the connection and have limited speeds.

There are some scenarios or use cases that warrant using dedicated private networking to join geographically dispersed clouds. This is where GoGrid’s CloudLink service comes into play.

GoGrid’s CloudLink is a data center interconnect product—a redundant 10 Gbps pipe that is isolated to GoGrid traffic only. CloudLink enables private network traffic between different servers in GoGrid’s US data centers. As part of our “Complex Infrastructure Made Easy” mission, we designed this service to be basic yet powerful and still meet the needs of demanding organizations. Because this is a private network, much like the private network within GoGrid’s standard cloud infrastructure, there are no bandwidth costs. You simply decide on the connection speed (10 Mbps, 100 Mbps, or 1 Gbps), configure your connection, and pay for just the dedicated connection. (more…) «The Top 3 Private Networking Use Cases for CloudLink»

Public Cloud Infrastructure Continues Gaining Momentum

Wednesday, March 6th, 2013 by

As the prospect of using cloud infrastructure technologies continues to influence decision-makers to adopt hosted services, companies are forced to choose which model they will implement: the private, public or hybrid network. In most cases, organizations are opting for the public cloud, because its multi-tenant environment and low buy-in opportunity lets firms of all sizes embrace the services.

A recent report by Gartner highlighted the progress of the public cloud, noting that it is forecast to generate roughly $131 billion in revenue in 2013, up 18.5 percent from the 2012 value of $111 billion. As executives gain more confidence in the cloud, they will leverage the solutions for a broader range of purposes, hoping to extend the value of the services to more departments and teams within the organization.

Public cloud infrastructure continues gaining momentum

Public cloud infrastructure continues gaining momentum

“The continued growth of the cloud services market will result from the adoption of cloud services for production systems and workloads, in addition to the development and testing scenarios that have led as the most prominent use case for public cloud services to date,” said Ed Anderson, research director at Gartner. “Evidence of this growth is found in the increasing demand for cloud services from end-user organizations, met by an increased supply of cloud services from suppliers.”

Some models garner more appreciation than others
Although the majority of the public cloud market is forecast to increase, certain segments of the industry will experience faster or more substantial growth than others. Because so many organizations are looking to augment storage, general computing and printing services, for example, the cloud infrastructure portion of the sector is forecast to develop quicker than other services.

Analysts said Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) grew 42.4 percent in 2012 to generate $6.1 billion in revenue and this rate will continue into this year, expanding 47.3 percent to $9 billion in revenue. This rapid evolution will make IaaS the fastest-growing cloud segment of the global market.

(more…) «Public Cloud Infrastructure Continues Gaining Momentum»

How Artizone.com Carved a Path to eCommerce Success

Thursday, February 7th, 2013 by

We recently talked with one of our newest customers, Artizone.com, about how it’s whetting the public’s appetite for local handmade eats with the help of GoGrid’s cloud infrastructure. Artizone.com is a personable online grocery site that combines two of the things people want most: delicious, healthy food and an easy way to get it. Not that the search and discovery process isn’t part of the whole gourmet experience. I’m from New York and I remember spending hours looking for the best deli and the best bakery and the best butcher. The hunt was a lot of fun, and the result was always amazing. But the time I spent getting to three different stores by bus or subway took a huge chunk out of my day and didn’t leave a lot of time to actually enjoy my “finds.”

Of course once online shopping became more than just a novelty, companies began to offer everything from sneakers to snicker doodles via the web—and eCommerce was born. Artizone has taken the “recipe” a step further by crafting a site that focuses on locally grown, organic, and hand-made foods. You can shop “by aisle” just like in a regular supermarket and choose from fresh produce, meats, and seafood. Or you can shop by “artisan” and learn about the folks who actually make the chocolates, breads, and salsas-to-die-for that Artizone carries. There are also pictures of the artisans, which makes you feel just as close to the source of the food as you would at a local Farmer’s Market. Big Al of Big Al’s Texas Rubs looks pretty much like you’d expect, and seeing his picture somehow makes you trust your decision to buy his rub.

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Artizone offers delivery-based service direct to your doorstep in Chicago and Dallas, depending on your locale selection, and ships nonperishable items throughout the US. And with food makers like Black Dog Gelato in Chicago and TJ’s Seafood Market in Dallas, you’re sure to find something new to try. Of course, the key to a great eCommerce website is the actual experience you have on the site. We all know what a good experience feels like: It’s easy to find what you’re looking for, you can get help right away if you need it via chat or phone, and buying is fast and straightforward (a piece of cake, in Artizone’s case). A great experience goes further by offering you things you didn’t know you wanted but suddenly realize you need, like delicious recipes that use the food you purchase on Artizone.com.

If a site’s disorganized or confusing, most of us will drop our cart like a hot potato (!) before we complete our purchase. And eCommerce companies just hate when we do that. They want to grab our attention, entertain and/or inform us, and then close the sale. That’s why creating a site that takes the “eek” out of eCommerce by hiding the behind-the-scenes mechanics is so important. Artizone’s VP of Research and Development, Sagi Briteman, agrees. “It’s liberating to be able to focus on our online store and user experience—and let GoGrid take care of the infrastructure,” he says. When you visit an eCommerce site like Artizone.com, the last thing you want to worry about is the technology that powers it—you should be focused on when you’ll get all the yummy treats you just ordered.

Naturally, eCommerce websites can’t stay the same week after week or we wouldn’t come back again—and again. If the company isn’t adding or refreshing the content, it might be expanding its services or trying to reach a new audience. Each time it expands to a new metropolitan area, for example, Artizone sees a huge jump in the number of food makers and customers it serves. And to make sure it could grow without worrying about how to meet that demand, the company took its time identifying a cloud infrastructure partner that really understood eCommerce.

(more…) «How Artizone.com Carved a Path to eCommerce Success»

Are These Really Mysteries? Solving Forbes’ “7 Great Unsolved Mysteries of Cloud Computing”

Wednesday, February 6th, 2013 by

From time to time, I come across an article that I feel compelled to respond to. Yesterday, I read “7 Great Unsolved Mysteries of Cloud Computing” written by Joe McKendrick (an author and independent researcher covering IT trends and markets) in Forbes.com. Although McKendrick definitely offers some thought-provoking questions in the form of “cloud mysteries,” part of me feels these mysteries were already solved a long time ago.

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What follows are the questions that McKendrick asks, my interpretation of his descriptions, and my responses to these mysteries. I’d love to hear your feedback on these mysteries and my responses, so be sure to leave a comment.

7 Great “Unsolved” Mysteries of Cloud Computing

McKendrick alludes to the 2010s as a “cloud computing migration.” A “migration” connotes a feeling of evolution, and I do believe that cloud computing is evolving through a natural progression (see “Riding the Gartner Hype Cycle Roller Coaster: Hang on to your Magic Quadrants!”) toward mainstream adoption.

But let’s take a look at the “unsolved” mysteries.

(more…) «Are These Really Mysteries? Solving Forbes’ “7 Great Unsolved Mysteries of Cloud Computing”»

High Availability with Dynamic Load Balancers

Monday, February 4th, 2013 by

Building out a highly available website means that it is fault-tolerant and reliable. A best practice is to put your web servers behind a load balancer not only to distribute load, but also to mitigate the risk of an end user accessing a failing web server. However, traditional load balancing funnels traffic into a single-tenant environment—a single point of failure. A better practice is to have a distributed load balancer that takes advantage of the features of the cloud and increases the fault-tolerance abilities on the load balancer. GoGrid’s Dynamic Load Balancer service is designed around a software-defined networking (SDN) architecture that turns the data center into one big load balancer.

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GoGrid’s Dynamic Load Balancer offers many features, but one of its core features is high availability (HA). It is HA in two ways.

First, on the real server side, deploying multiple clones of your real servers is a standard load-balancing practice. That way, if one of your servers goes down, the load balancer will use the remaining servers in the pool to continue to serve up content. In addition, each GoGrid cloud server that you deploy as a web server (in the real server pool) is most likely on a different physical node. This setup provides additional protection in the case of hardware failure.

Second, on the Dynamic Load Balancer side, the load balancers are designed to be self-healing. In case of a hardware failure, Dynamic Load Balancing is designed to immediately recover to a functioning node. The Virtual IP address of the Dynamic Load Balancer (the VIP) is maintained as well as all the configurations, with all the changes happening on the back end. This approach ensures the Dynamic Load Balancer will continue to function with minimal interruption, preventing the Dynamic Load Balancer from being a single point of failure. Because the load balancer is the public-facing side of a web server, whenever it goes down the website goes down. Having a self-healing load balancer therefore makes the web application more resilient.

Users with websites or applications that need to always be available would benefit from including GoGrid’s Dynamic Load Balancing in their infrastructure. The load balancer is important for ensuring the public side of a service is always available; however, including easily scalable cloud servers, the ability to store images of those servers in persistent storage, and the option to replicate infrastructure between data centers with CloudLink are all important elements of a successful HA setup.

(more…) «High Availability with Dynamic Load Balancers»