Posts Tagged ‘How To’

 

How To Build a Virtual Private Cloud on GoGrid

Wednesday, December 14th, 2011 by

At GoGrid, we are often asked to provide solutions for a variety of use cases. More often than not, businesses are not looking for “standard” cloud implementations. And what really is “standard?” When you think about it, every business has unique needs in order to satisfy their cloud challenges. We help companies craft these solutions daily and we call it Creating a Cloud Fingerprint. But, as is the nature of cloud computing, many users desire to figure it out themselves, simply because solutions can be architected fairly easily, and if it isn’t quite right, they can be modified.

In our regular discussions with companies looking for information on how they can benefit from cloud Infrastructure as a Service, we often come across the same set of hurdles, namely:

  • Most established companies have an existing infrastructure investment, and may not be willing or able to sacrifice these investments,
  • Some infrastructure components may not be generally available through IaaS vendors, such as Enterprise security or storage infrastructure,
  • Some applications or data will be deemed “too sensitive” for the cloud due to internal objections or compliance constraints,
  • Maintaining and growing an on-premise solution or even data center is not only difficult, but extremely expensive,
  • Doing a full migration to the cloud comes with a very high conversion and operational cost,
  • Business simply are unsure as to how to best leverage cloud computing.

With these challenges in mind, we have a solution that allows business not only to utilize their existing infrastructure, but also leverage GoGrid’s public cloud to create a Virtual Private Cloud on GoGrid.

But, addressing the points above is critical in the solution. Therefore, we wanted to be sure:

  • Customers could retain their existing infrastructure,
  • GoGrid’s platform is used as an EXTENSION of that infrastructure,
  • GoGrid’s customers have a wide range of network security options/policies available,
  • Customers are able to fully leverage the advantages of cloud infrastructure, and the elimination of capital expenditures and their associated resource costs,
  • A customer can fully utilize their existing infrastructure investment.

(more…) «How To Build a Virtual Private Cloud on GoGrid»

How To Set Up Private IP Segregation with CloudPassage in the GoGrid Cloud

Thursday, September 29th, 2011 by

CloudPassage is a key security partner that has images available on the GoGrid Partner Exchange. The CloudPassage images on GoGrid come pre-installed with their Halo daemon. This is available on CentOS, Debian, Red Hat, and Ubuntu on both 32-bit and 64-bit flavors. Alternately, you can launch a GoGrid base image and install the Halo daemon on your own. This tutorial assumes that you have a basic understanding of Linux and SSH as well as basic firewall strategies. It also assumes that you know how to configure private IPs so that will not be covered here.

How to Set Up a Gluster File System within the GoGrid Cloud (Part 1)

Friday, August 19th, 2011 by

In this blog post series, I want to take a closer look at a storage technology called Gluster File System, and how it can be set up (this article), connected to (article #2) and expand storage (article #3). This is the first blog post of the series and I will review what GlusterFS is, why you would consider using it, and how to deploy it using the GoGrid GlusterFS Partner GSI.

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GoGrid offers a great storage solution called Cloud Storage. But what if you want to deploy your own storage so that you can directly control performance and redundancy? What software would you use to provide this? The simple answer is Gluster. It is a powerful software-based storage solution that offers a centralized controlled storage pool management system that is very easy to use.

There are many different ways to take advantage of the GlusterFS storage solution. (Note: in the descriptions below a “brick” is a GoGrid Virtual Server.)

1. Distributed Volumes:

“Distributed volumes distribute files throughout the bricks in the volume. You can use distributed volumes where the requirement is to scale storage and the redundancy is either not important or is provided by other hardware/software layers.” – Gluster.org

(more…) «How to Set Up a Gluster File System within the GoGrid Cloud (Part 1)»

How to Monitor Your Windows 2008 Server on GoGrid with Cacti 0.8.7g

Tuesday, June 14th, 2011 by

This is the 3rd and final post in my setup and use of the GoGrid Community GSI server for Cacti Monitoring. In my first post, “Set Up A Cacti Monitoring Server in Minutes with this GoGrid Community Server Image,,” I covered how to deploy Cacti in your GoGrid environment using a Community GSI. My second post, “How to Monitor Your Ubuntu Server on GoGrid in 6 Steps Using Cacti 0.8.7g,” I discussed how to initiate monitoring of your GoGrid Ubuntu server. Now to round things off, I want to show you how to link up your Cacti monitoring server to a Windows Server 2008 server on your GoGrid network. The base install of Cacti 0.8.7g will allow you to monitor the server’s bandwidth utilization, Ethernet errors, number of logged in users, and total number of processes. There are other templates available to monitor other components and services on your Windows server, but they require using an additional SNMP service beyond the Microsoft SNMP service. My blog post won’t get into the latter, but I will cover the former.

Objectives:

  1. Configure GoGrid private network connectivity on Windows 2008 Server and test connectivity to Cacti server
  2. Configure and start Microsoft SNMP service on your Windows 2008 Server
  3. Add new Cacti device
  4. Create graphs to log Local Connection and Local Connection 2 bandwidth and errors, Logged in Users, and server processes

Configure GoGrid private network connectivity on Windows 2008 Server and test connectivity to Cacti server

Below we see that we have a server (“Web2”) deployed on GoGrid with a public IP. Let’s log into this server and configure the private network with a private IP from the same subnet of the Cacti Monitor server. As I described in my previous post – I am using the prescribed private IP subnet from my GoGrid portal, contained under the List tab and then under Network – Private Network.

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(more…) «How to Monitor Your Windows 2008 Server on GoGrid with Cacti 0.8.7g»

How To Monitor your Ubuntu Server on GoGrid in 6 Steps Using Cacti 0.8.7g

Wednesday, June 1st, 2011 by

In my previous post, “Set Up A Cacti Monitoring Server in Minutes with this GoGrid Community Server Image”, I showed how to use a Community GSI to quickly and easily set up a monitoring server on GoGrid running Cacti. In this second part of the Cacti GoGrid Community GSI blog series, I would like to walk you through how I connected my Cacti server up to an Ubuntu server (a node in my Glusterfs file storage array). First we will review the objectives we are looking to achieve and then dive into each one.

Objectives:

  1. Confirm private network configuration on both Cacti server and Ubuntu server, and test connectivity.
  2. Enable SNMP server and configure SNMP rocommunity string on Ubuntu servers.
  3. Establish SNMP agent listening IP address
  4. Create “Device” in Cacti console and confirm SNMP connectivity to Ubuntu server
  5. Create Graphs – CPU usage, Load Average, Memory Usage, PING Latency, Processes, Eth0 Traffic, Eth1 Traffic
  6. Repeat process for other Ubuntu servers in your network.

Confirm private network configuration on both Cacti server and Ubuntu server, and test connectivity

On GoGrid, you have the ability to network your servers together over a private network allocated to your account. (Note: all private networking within GoGrid is free.) We need to take advantage of this secure communication method to allow your Cacti server SNMP access to your servers. I recommend you use the private network IP range that is specified in your account – under the “List” tab then “Network”.

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(more…) «How To Monitor your Ubuntu Server on GoGrid in 6 Steps Using Cacti 0.8.7g»