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Posts Tagged ‘Government’

 

Public sector makes cloud infrastructure moves

Tuesday, February 5th, 2013 by

The rapidly evolving cloud infrastructure market is providing organizations around the world with new opportunities to improve operations through innovation. These capabilities are not only limited to the private sector, as government agencies and other public sector bodies will also begin to implement cloud services to enhance the way tasks are carried out.

Public sector makes cloud infrastructure moves

Public sector makes cloud infrastructure moves

A recent report by Gartner highlighted how the growing public cloud industry is changing how the government consumes security solutions because many of these will be hosted in cloud-based environments in the coming years. Furthermore, the ongoing adoption of various cloud computing services is forcing the public sector to prioritize the protection of their virtual infrastructure. As a result, the cloud will be incorporated into national infrastructure regulations by 2016, requiring decision-makers to implement advanced security tools.

“The popularity and increased adoption of cloud-based security services, albeit at different degrees, will influence the shape of future security marketplaces,” said Ruggero Contu, research director at Gartner. “Deployments of virtualization, and its replacing of traditional physical hardware platforms, are expected to impact the deployment model of future network security capabilities, which are expected to be based increasingly on virtual security appliances.”

Security’s future may rest in the clouds
Gartner analysts forecast growth rates for cloud-based security solutions to outpace premise-based offerings within the next three years because 10 percent of overall IT security applications will be delivered via the cloud by 2015. While this trend is likely to occur around the world, Gartner predicts North America will account for the majority of spending.

A separate report by Trend Micro highlighted similar findings, noting that the cloud security software market is forecast to expand at a compound annual growth rate of more than 41 percent through 2014, eventually generating more than $963 million in revenue.

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Cloud News: Multiple Faces of Cloud on Windows Azure, Real-World Cloud Case Study & State Cloud Service Providers

Tuesday, December 8th, 2009 by

It’s still cold in San Francisco. No snow today but there are a few “clouds” (sorry). Posts and articles I saw today:

  • Windows Azure and the many faces of cloud
    “One of the reasons it’s so difficult to satisfactorily define cloud computing is that people have many different needs and expectations from a cloud platform. To start a conversation about cloud — especially one that seeks to evaluate the relative merits of competing cloud platforms — without first identifying what needs are being met is to invite misunderstanding and confusion. So before I come to my analysis of Microsoft’s Windows Azure platform and the hidden danger lurking there for many ISVs looking to embark on a SaaS strategy, I’m going to segment cloud computing into several important but separate categories.” (source: ZDNet)

    • Commentary: This article is an extremely good analysis of Windows Azure and details a series of use cases for companies evaluating Azure as a solution including: “Short-term, overflow or burst capacity to supplement on-premise assets, Cloud-based services and applications that extend on-premise assets with new capabilities, Interim hosting as part of a cloud migration strategy, and, Cloud-based services and applications that replace and supersede on-premise assets.” One way to use Azure and GoGrid together is outlined in this post (with a demo video) where we demonstrate how the GoGrid cloud can be used seamlessly building, deploying and testing applications for Windows Azure.
  • Gartner “Cloud Computing in the Real World” Panel Features Appistry Customer Next Century
    “This year cloud computing is front-and-center at the Gartner Application Architecture, Development and Integration (AADI) Summit in Las Vegas, NV. One of the many interesting items on the agenda this year was today’s no-BS enterprise cloud end-user panel, organized by analysts David Cearley and Gene Phifer, along with the OMG/SOA Consortium. The focus of the panel is on real-world, enterprise-grade cloud computing deployments.” (source: Appistry blog)

    • Commentary: Appistry has been a long-time partner of GoGrid’s. We have a RHEL image that has Appistry already baked into it. It’s nice to get Sam’s analysis (in the form of a case study, albeit from our competitor) of the practical applications of moving physical infrastructure into the cloud. Sam points out how there is a lot of “fluff” around the promotion of Cloud Computing and that actual case studies are the way to cut through the hype. The study talks about how with physical infrastructure costing $80k and consuming 8-14 days of processing time, the same process could be achieved within 12 hours and only costing $130 per run. The same could be done on any Infrastructure-based Cloud with dramatic time and cost savings. It was also nice to see the GoGrid Cloud Pyramid in the graphic.
  • Government Technologist: States As Cloud Service Providers
    “As state CIOs devise cloud computing strategies, they must assess whether their teams can provide services with the same skill and efficiency as commercial providers. Some state CIOs are evaluating cloud computing as the way to provide IT services to state agencies and other groups of users, including local governments and schools. It makes sense for states to go this route, but there’s a right way and a wrong way.” (source: InformationWeek)

    • Commentary: Author John Foley brings up some interesting points here. Do States and Education go with Private or Public Clouds? Or is there a happy medium? It seems that while some items must remain under strict “state” control, others could easily be offloaded to a public cloud. State budgets are in the red now, so plopping down multi-millions of dollars to built their own private cloud is probably not something that tax-payers could swallow very easily. The right strategy I would think is to do a cost-benefit analysis on a gradual move of non-critical/data-sensitive IT infrastructure to a public cloud. The problem here though is that “gradual” is an extremely subjective term. For me, gradual would be over a quarter or two. For state/government, “gradual” means 1-2 years or more. There are many efficiencies to be gained as well as considerable cost saving (that could be invested elsewhere…education perhaps?). One way or another, I agree with Foley in that governments should offload some of the risks and costs onto public cloud providers when implementing their IT strategies.

    (more…) «Cloud News: Multiple Faces of Cloud on Windows Azure, Real-World Cloud Case Study & State Cloud Service Providers»

Cloud News: DoD “Save Millions with Cloud”, India Looks at the Cloud & SOA Intersects the Cloud

Friday, December 4th, 2009 by

More fun scraping the layers of Cloud Computing news. Here is what caught my interest today:

  • DoD: Cloud Will Save Us ‘Hundreds of Millions’
    “Moving the U.S. military’s IT operations to a cloud computing model hasn’t been easy. But the payoff is clear, according to Henry Sienkiewicz, who oversees the Department of Defense’s cloud computing platform, known as the Rapid Access Computing Environment (RACE).” (source: Data Center Knowledge)

    • Commentary: The Obama Administration has been very forward thinking when it comes to Cloud Computing. I’m encouraged to see the tremendous efforts being made across the board by the monolithic sectors of government to embrace or at least seriously consider the Cloud as a feasible and substantial IT strategy. Obviously, not everything within Government can be “cloud-enabled” to gain all of the professed efficiencies. There are data and security concerns, many of which are shared by the Enterprise, however, in-roads are being made to gain adoption across the board. Here at GoGrid, we host some Government clients and have plenty of Enterprise customers. IT managers and C-level execs are now being pushed from multiple angles to implement cloud strategies. 2009 was a year of “research and understand” Cloud Computing as a potential alternative. 2010 will be the year of implementation and wider adoption across the board.
  • Cloud Computing, a cost and time effective solution: experts
    “If used smartly, cloud computing –a process by which computing tasks can be carried out on third party internet servers on a payment for use of IT infrastructure basis –can be very cost-effective, speakers at a seminar on “Demystifying Cloud Computing” organised here on Friday by the FICCI (Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry) said.” (source: thehindu.com)

    • Commentary: This article provides a generalized overview of Cloud Computing. The sole reason I’m listing it is to showcase how other worldwide governments (in this case, the FICCI – Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry) are, like the US and others, truly marching forward with this IT strategy in hand. I’m not sure if it is just me, over-analyzing the article, but it seems that some of the discussion points are ones that were already talked about this year ad nauseum, but of course, I live in a “cloud bubble” and already expect IT professionals to have a firm understanding of the concepts. But there are definitely some good points here, specifically “it works best if you know exactly the amount of process you are planning to run and the duration.” However, the example cited is the over-played NYTimes example of digitizing all of the 11 million articles. This one-time use of Cloud processing is but one of many types of possible uses of Cloud Computing. Hopefully, meetings similar to what the FICCI had will explore the Cloud much deeper.
  • Where SOA and cloud computing intersect: the loosely coupled business
    “One of the things we talk about here is how service orientation is enabling the rise of the “loosely coupled” business — an organization that acts as a broker of services, focusing on its core business and serving its markets while relying on services brought in through third parties (or internally). SOA and cloud computing are bringing this about, and I’ve encountered an example of this new loosely coupled business model in action.” (source: ZDNet)

    • Commentary: This is an interesting case study of M-Dot, a digital coupon processing service, who utilized Cloud Computing to launch as a startup back in November 2008. The mere fact that startups have to worry a bit less on their IT infrastructure and focus more of their human capital and money on the development of a product and service goes a long way this day and age. It is simply “smart business.” Outlined within the article is the discussion of a “hybrid cloud model” which utilizes the benefits of the public cloud coupled with a private cloud to maintain data security. At GoGrid, we realized this importance quite a while ago when we announced Cloud Connect (“Hybrid Hosting”), a means to physically join the GoGrid Cloud infrastructure with our ServePath physical dedicated server infrastructure, all via a private dedicated connection. I’m happy to see that this type of model is starting to get coverage within the Tech Media space.

    (more…) «Cloud News: DoD “Save Millions with Cloud”, India Looks at the Cloud & SOA Intersects the Cloud»