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Posts Tagged ‘GoGrid’

 

How to Create a GoGrid Cloud Server Image for Rapid Scalability

Thursday, January 31st, 2013 by

Let’s say that you have fully configured a Cloud Server running on GoGrid. You’re so proud of your achievement that you want to share your configuration with your team or perhaps even with the GoGrid community. And let’s imagine that you or your company has developed a software solution that you’d like to monetize within a Public Cloud. Well, the process of creating and sharing a GoGrid Cloud Server Image (GSI) is easy and literally takes just a few minutes.

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Similar to our previous “How To” article and video (“How to Select, Configure, & Deploy a GoGrid Cloud Server in Minutes”), the process of creating a GSI is straightforward and can be simplified into 3 easy steps:

1. Select
2. Save
3. Share

Before I show you how easy it is to create a GoGrid Cloud Server Image, here are some ways you might use it:

  • To reduce setup and configuration times for new servers
  • To enable rapid horizontal scaling of servers
  • To create a back-up repository of your GoGrid servers
  • To share your server configuration with your team for future cloud deployments
  • To monetize a software solution

(more…) «How to Create a GoGrid Cloud Server Image for Rapid Scalability»

How to Recover from a Linux Security Breach – Recovery & Hardening (Part 2)

Tuesday, January 29th, 2013 by

This is Part 2 of a GoGrid security blog series on identifying and recovering from a Linux security breach. Part 1 provided general guidelines for conducting a security analysis on a compromised Linux server and forming strategic teams to address and resolve the breach.

In this article, we’ll review some recommended steps for recovering from a breach.

Recovering from the Breach

Lock the doors

Now that you’ve confirmed that there are no intruders logged in and you’ve identified the established connections, it’s time to “lock the doors.” Locking the doors largely depends on who is managing your firewall. Contact GoGrid in the event that we’re managing your firewall or perform the following actions if you manage your firewall:

  • Modify your system’s iptables configuration to restrict all remote console connections such as SSH to your office network
  • Modify your system’s iptables configuration to block all previously identified suspicious connections from and to your system.
  • Modify your system’s iptables to block all other services from the public Internet to your server. Doing so will effectively bring down your website or services, but you want to avoid compromising your customers or web site visitors.

Install and run a rootkit analyzer

(more…) «How to Recover from a Linux Security Breach – Recovery & Hardening (Part 2)»

How to Recover from a Linux Security Breach – Forensics, Analysis, & Building Teams (Part 1)

Monday, January 28th, 2013 by

This 2-part GoGrid security blog series provides general guidelines for conducting a security analysis on a compromised Linux server and for recovering from a breach. Before you begin the security analysis, you need to consider two important factors:

1. The type of data your compromised server is storing or transmitting,
2. How important the server’s function is to your business

The data type—Personally Identifiable Information (PII) or Protected Health Information (PHI), for example—is important because your organization could be legally required to notify external parties and local or federal government agencies in the event of a breach. The compromised server’s function is important because its criticality may drive the recovery timeline.

You also may want to consider engaging a third-party that specializes in security forensics.

This series will cover 3 important items:

1) Understanding & assessing the breach
2) Setting up forensics & recovery teams
3) Recovering from the breach

Although this series won’t replace what a competent security firm can accomplish, it does provide an overview of some core processes, procedures, and activities you can do to potentially recover from a breach. And because each incident varies based on your computer system, be sure to conduct additional analysis and consult with experts to double-check your breach identification and resolution plan. (more…) «How to Recover from a Linux Security Breach – Forensics, Analysis, & Building Teams (Part 1)»

How to Select, Configure, & Deploy a GoGrid Cloud Server in Minutes

Thursday, January 10th, 2013 by

If you visit the GoGrid homepage, you’ll be greeted with the following headline:

We make cloud infrastructure easy. Really easy.

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But without trying our cloud infrastructure service, how can you really know what “easy” means? It can be completely subjective and open to interpretation. Even so, we stand firmly by our statement. It IS easy because it simply boils down to 3 action words:

1. select
2. configure
3. deploy.

Don’t just take my word for it though. Your best bet is to test it out yourself. (Here’s a hint: If you’re new to GoGrid, contact one of our Cloud Experts, mention this blog post, and get a $100 service credit to see if we’re right.)

Almost as easy as watching a video

I understand you may not have time to do some hands-on testing so we’ve put together a short (3 minute 40 second) video that walks you through how to: (more…) «How to Select, Configure, & Deploy a GoGrid Cloud Server in Minutes»

Windows Server 2012 Now Available in the GoGrid Cloud

Tuesday, January 8th, 2013 by

When we launched our Cloud Infrastructure back in April 2008, one of our core requirements was to not only provide Linux distributions, but also Windows Servers in the cloud. We offered Windows Server 2003 immediately and a few months later added Windows Server 2008 to the mix.

Last month, we added Windows Server 2012 64-bit to round out our robust Windows Server line in the GoGrid cloud.

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We continue to provide Windows Servers in the cloud license-free meaning that you do not pay an additional surcharge on top of your cloud infrastructure costs. The only exceptions to this are for Windows Servers that have Microsoft SQL Server included.

It’s important to note that there is no longer an 8-core limitation on cloud servers. We now provide the same core allocations as we do with our Linux cloud servers, specifically:

  • XX-Large Cloud Servers with 16 GB RAM now come with 16-cores
  • XXX-Large Cloud Servers with 24 GB RAM now come with 24-cores

The number of cores is directly tied to the size of the server: (more…) «Windows Server 2012 Now Available in the GoGrid Cloud»