Posts Tagged ‘failover’

 

Geographic Load Balancing and Disaster Recovery Best Practices for Global Websites

Wednesday, August 21st, 2013 by

Technological World

If you’re running a global website, you’ll want to reduce the latency for customers around the world. GoGrid offers the global infrastructure and robust network to support this setup. With Geographic Load Balancing, GoGrid can also improve performance to your website from around the world. Here are recommended best practices for building a reliable, high-performing global website.

Deploying the Correct Infrastructure Setup

Global websites still require local infrastructure to be truly effective in reducing latency. GoGrid has data centers around the world where you can deploy infrastructure to better serve your customers. Deploy infrastructure to the Western United States (in our US-West-1 data center), Eastern United States (in US-East-1) and Europe (EU-West-1). Although your specific configuration is unique to your setup, you’ll most likely have database and webservers in each of these data centers.

In addition, you’ll want to keep your servers in-sync. One option between US-West-1 and US-East-1 is to use Cloud Link, a dedicated, private line between our data centers. This connectivity makes synching your servers secure and easy. Once you have your back end in place, you’ll want to configure your front end.

Geographic Load Balancing

(more…) «Geographic Load Balancing and Disaster Recovery Best Practices for Global Websites»

You Don’t Need a Superstorm: Disaster Recovery Basics

Monday, November 12th, 2012 by

In this blog post, I’m going to discuss disaster recovery. After superstorm Sandy on the East Coast, there were people without power weeks after the storm. Data centers were affected by the storm as well. And although GoGrid’s East Coast data center didn’t experience an outage, some providers did. So it is timely to consider geographically redundant solutions rather than wait for the next superstorm.

Geographic Redundancy

There are three basic strategies you can implement today on GoGrid to make your application better able to recover from a data center outage: cold standby, warm standby, and full geographic-redundancy with multiple active data centers. Let’s start off with a definition:

Redundancy: (noun) the ability of an application or system to resist the failure of one or more constituent parts, or recover quickly from such failure.

Systems administration and IT management boils down to that proverbial 3:00am phone call. Your application is down. How do you respond? Having the proper plan and appropriate recovery assets in place is the key to surviving this all-too-real scenario. How current are your backups? Do you have standby servers already in place? If not, how quickly can you bring new ones online?

It’s pretty standard to have offsite backups. If the offsite backups are in a secondary data center, they can be used to springboard reconstituting your application. GoGrid offers two products that make this process easy to implement: (more…) «You Don’t Need a Superstorm: Disaster Recovery Basics»

How to Configure Zeus’ New Load Balancer in the GoGrid Cloud

Wednesday, September 14th, 2011 by

Zeus is a new GoGrid partner that provides a software load balancing product as a partner image called “Zeus Load Balancer 200Mbps”. There are three immediate features that come to mind when thinking about how to leverage Zeus within GoGrid: Load Balancing, Failover and Clustering. Note that this first image is a preview with certain feature set. It contains the majority of Zeus features but is capped at two clustered servers and 200 Mbits of bandwidth. Additional images are expected to be released by the end of the year.

This tutorial assumes that you have basic understanding of Linux and SSH as well as basic load balancing and failover strategies.

Cross Data Center Load Balancing / Failover

One of the main uses cases for Zeus is to load balance servers in the same data center. However, a more interesting use case is to quickly and easily load balance web servers within one data center and support failover to another data center. The process is straight forward. First, deploy the Zeus partner image as a VM with 1G RAM in the US-West-1. This example assumes that you already have web servers running on both the US-West-1 and US-East-1 data centers.

Once the Zeus image has been deployed, SSH into the server using the root login. Your logins can be found in the GoGrid web portal by clicking on the server icon, then Tools > Passwords.

We recommend changing your automatically created, default password as soon as you login.

(more…) «How to Configure Zeus’ New Load Balancer in the GoGrid Cloud»

Learn How a GoGrid Customer Created a Multiple Data Center Routing & Failover Infrastructure Environment

Tuesday, March 22nd, 2011 by

We absolutely LOVE hearing how GoGrid customers are using our cloud solutions to create unique “cloud fingerprints” and environments using the features and data centers of GoGrid. Paul Trippett just published a very interesting write-up of an infrastructure environment that addresses many of the common concerns facing any company looking to provide a highly-redundant infrastructure while also ensuring a solid Service Level Agreement (SLA) for their customers.

customer_showcase_GoGrid_logo_sm

You can find Paul’s original write-up titled “Utilizing GoGrid’s Multiple Data Centers for Routing and Failover” on his site. With his permission, we have reposted the article so that others can learn, mimic and build upon his unique scenario.

At the beginning of the year one of our customers asked us if we can provide an SLA for StormRETS and with it, the sound gritting teeth suddenly echoed around the room. As you can imagine, this caused more questions than which we actually had answers for:

blockquote_2 What kind of SLA did we want to provide and what could we realistically provide?

Our hosting provider, at the time, had an SLA which entailed “We don’t give any guarantee that your servers will be available, but if for any reason they are unavailable we will get the back up and running as soon as we can.”, erm, how on earth can we build a SLA based on that. It was decided at this time we would migrate our servers to another hosting provider, one at least with a SLA we can build on and a company we can actually contact directly should a problem arise.

(more…) «Learn How a GoGrid Customer Created a Multiple Data Center Routing & Failover Infrastructure Environment»