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Posts Tagged ‘Enterprise’

 

Cloud opportunities, benefits exceed global expectations

Friday, May 31st, 2013 by

When cloud computing first emerged, IT analysts had mixed feelings about the hosted services, unsure if they would be embraced or disregarded in the enterprise. Today, experts understand that the cloud now plays a central role in the ongoing development of the business world, providing decision-makers and employees with innovative solutions for growth and performance improvements.

Cloud opportunities, benefits exceed global expectations

Cloud opportunities, benefits exceed global expectations

Companies are using a mix of different cloud models, including Platform, Software and Infrastructure as a Service, all with positive results. In fact, a recent CA Technologies survey of IT decision-makers who have been using the cloud for at least a year found that the benefits of using the hosted solutions are exceeding many respondents’ expectations.

Many executives highlighted the cost-saving advantages of the cloud. This is because the ongoing use of the cloud is allowing decision-makers to become more familiar with the technology and, as a result, establish new goals and objectives. “Cost is often considered an early benefit – or even a required result – in order for IT teams to justify moving in the direction of the cloud,” said John Michelsen, chief technology officer of CA Technologies. “Once they show that cloud computing improves the bottom line, they can shift their focus to innovation and other objectives, such as increased performance and enhanced security.”

Who is using the cloud?
CA Technologies found several unique distinctions between organizations planning to invest more in cloud servers and other solutions within the next year and firms that are still on the fence. First, businesses that have been using the cloud for four or more years are roughly six times as likely to spend more money on the hosted services in 2013 than their counterparts that are relatively newer to the environment. This suggests that companies that have done more than just tested the water are more comfortable with the cloud and are experiencing greater results.

Second, the study found that organizations in the United States are more likely to invest in the cloud this year than businesses in the U.K., France, Germany, Italy and Benelux. In fact, 48 percent of U.S. respondents stated they plan to up cloud spending by up to 30 percent, while another 17 percent will invest even more. This is a stark contrast between the 42 percent and 4 percent, respectively, of European IT decision-makers.

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Convincing the Workforce to Get On Board with Cloud

Thursday, March 28th, 2013 by

As the cloud computing market grows, business decision-makers around the world are recognizing the potential benefits associated with leveraging the services in the workplace. By using the cloud, companies of all sizes can reduce costs, improve operations and enhance collaboration between off-site employees, road warriors and the increasingly popular teleworkers. Despite these advantages, some individuals are still hesitant to adopt the cloud, largely because it is unfamiliar territory.

Convincing the workforce to get on board with cloud

Convincing the workforce to get on board with cloud

The cloud represents major change for all businesses, enabling organizations to do more with less. While some companies experience implementation challenges, many of these obstacles are associated with people and processes, not necessarily the technology itself, according to a report by ReadWriteWeb. This means that the cloud is relatively easy to deploy in the workplace – once executives get employees on board.

Overcoming resistance to change can sometimes be difficult. By demonstrating to individuals that the way they currently work is outdated and inefficient, decision-makers may have better luck convincing the workforce that implementing a cloud infrastructure can be extremely effective.

The old ways no longer work
The saying, “you can’t teach an old dog new tricks,” rings true in the enterprise, as many employees cling to outdated practices, despite the presence of advanced technologies capable of improving efficiency. The emergence of cloud services in particular offers businesses the chance to automate processes and implement new best practices that will augment operations, ReadWriteWeb noted.

Other employees will stick with the “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” routine, noting that the presence of tools used to improve efficiency doesn’t mean companies have to conform. Unfortunately, the real problems lie with apathy and not doing anything, the news source said. If an organization neglects the cloud, it will become increasingly difficult to stay competitive in today’s economy, especially because that firm will have trouble capturing, storing and analyzing big data – one of the key differentiators between a successful enterprise and one that is doomed to experience challenges.

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Cloud News: DoD “Save Millions with Cloud”, India Looks at the Cloud & SOA Intersects the Cloud

Friday, December 4th, 2009 by

More fun scraping the layers of Cloud Computing news. Here is what caught my interest today:

  • DoD: Cloud Will Save Us ‘Hundreds of Millions’
    “Moving the U.S. military’s IT operations to a cloud computing model hasn’t been easy. But the payoff is clear, according to Henry Sienkiewicz, who oversees the Department of Defense’s cloud computing platform, known as the Rapid Access Computing Environment (RACE).” (source: Data Center Knowledge)

    • Commentary: The Obama Administration has been very forward thinking when it comes to Cloud Computing. I’m encouraged to see the tremendous efforts being made across the board by the monolithic sectors of government to embrace or at least seriously consider the Cloud as a feasible and substantial IT strategy. Obviously, not everything within Government can be “cloud-enabled” to gain all of the professed efficiencies. There are data and security concerns, many of which are shared by the Enterprise, however, in-roads are being made to gain adoption across the board. Here at GoGrid, we host some Government clients and have plenty of Enterprise customers. IT managers and C-level execs are now being pushed from multiple angles to implement cloud strategies. 2009 was a year of “research and understand” Cloud Computing as a potential alternative. 2010 will be the year of implementation and wider adoption across the board.
  • Cloud Computing, a cost and time effective solution: experts
    “If used smartly, cloud computing –a process by which computing tasks can be carried out on third party internet servers on a payment for use of IT infrastructure basis –can be very cost-effective, speakers at a seminar on “Demystifying Cloud Computing” organised here on Friday by the FICCI (Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry) said.” (source: thehindu.com)

    • Commentary: This article provides a generalized overview of Cloud Computing. The sole reason I’m listing it is to showcase how other worldwide governments (in this case, the FICCI – Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry) are, like the US and others, truly marching forward with this IT strategy in hand. I’m not sure if it is just me, over-analyzing the article, but it seems that some of the discussion points are ones that were already talked about this year ad nauseum, but of course, I live in a “cloud bubble” and already expect IT professionals to have a firm understanding of the concepts. But there are definitely some good points here, specifically “it works best if you know exactly the amount of process you are planning to run and the duration.” However, the example cited is the over-played NYTimes example of digitizing all of the 11 million articles. This one-time use of Cloud processing is but one of many types of possible uses of Cloud Computing. Hopefully, meetings similar to what the FICCI had will explore the Cloud much deeper.
  • Where SOA and cloud computing intersect: the loosely coupled business
    “One of the things we talk about here is how service orientation is enabling the rise of the “loosely coupled” business — an organization that acts as a broker of services, focusing on its core business and serving its markets while relying on services brought in through third parties (or internally). SOA and cloud computing are bringing this about, and I’ve encountered an example of this new loosely coupled business model in action.” (source: ZDNet)

    • Commentary: This is an interesting case study of M-Dot, a digital coupon processing service, who utilized Cloud Computing to launch as a startup back in November 2008. The mere fact that startups have to worry a bit less on their IT infrastructure and focus more of their human capital and money on the development of a product and service goes a long way this day and age. It is simply “smart business.” Outlined within the article is the discussion of a “hybrid cloud model” which utilizes the benefits of the public cloud coupled with a private cloud to maintain data security. At GoGrid, we realized this importance quite a while ago when we announced Cloud Connect (“Hybrid Hosting”), a means to physically join the GoGrid Cloud infrastructure with our ServePath physical dedicated server infrastructure, all via a private dedicated connection. I’m happy to see that this type of model is starting to get coverage within the Tech Media space.

    (more…) «Cloud News: DoD “Save Millions with Cloud”, India Looks at the Cloud & SOA Intersects the Cloud»

8 More Cloud Computing Predictions for 2009

Thursday, December 18th, 2008 by

Hi, my name is Randy Bias, the new VP Technology Strategy at GoGrid.  As the new year approaches, I’m happy to make my first post on this blog.

I haven’t ever provided a New Year prediction list before, so I hope you will indulge.  As the newest member of and the technology visionary on the GoGrid executive team I’m pretty excited to toss a few predictions into the ring for 2009.  Hope this inspires more cloud conversation.  Find more on my thoughts around infrastructure and cloud computing on my personal blog.

  1. Cloud-Oriented Architectures (COA) becomes much better understood
    De facto standards drive the adoption of cross-cloud, loosely-coupled, distributed web applications that are connected by REST interfaces.  The community at large comes to understand that this new category of applications are Cloud-Oriented Architectures (COA) and differ from SOA in being deployed on clouds, aware of clouds, and built using grassroots-derived standards instead of top-down standards like SOAP & WS-*.
  2. No Cloud Standards Emerge
    Despite hype and hope, no new top-down derived cloud ‘standard’ emerges.  Some forward thinking providers do move the ball forward by opening their platforms and hints of potential standards start to develop by widely embraced, but grass roots developed standards and APIs.
  3. Big Iron still has no clue
    The Big Iron folks (Dell, IBM, Sun, and HP) continue to flail at offering ‘cloud’ offerings because they can’t take their focus away from hardware.  Nothing real develops from those folks except failed attempts at ‘standardization’ and cloud offerings.
  4. Small and Medium Enterprise (SME) look to clouds & DR
    Economic reality forces the hand of SMEs looking to shave IT costs.  More and more dip their toes into the water, moving their non-production and elastic compute needs to ‘the cloud’.  Disaster Recovery becomes the ‘killer app’ for forward thinking SMEs who want to minimize their exposure while maximizing dollars saved.
  5. Broad testing of internal clouds by F500
    Fortune 500 widely tests internal cloud systems using VMware vCloud, EUCALYPTUS, OpenNebula, and related offerings.  Small scale tests, but enough to get a flavor.
  6. Content Distribution Networks (CDNs) wake up and realize their business model is at stake
    CDNs finally figure out that as clouds go global the primary barrier to entry for the CDN business, foreign real estate deals, disappears allowing customers to roll their own and a flood of *more* small upstarts enters the already crowded market.  Smart CDNs turn into global cloud providers, further accelerating adoption, or remain clueless and are squeezed from both sides.
  7. Hybrid clouds come of age: scale-out on virtual servers and up on iron
    Clue finally sets in that virtualization != clouds and multiple major cloud vendors provide combined virtual+physical server solutions, on-demand just like any other cloud computing offering.  The new hybrid model sets Web 2.0 folks on fire escalating up take for folks reticent to re-engineer for massively distributed databases.  Instead, using big iron for scaling up the DB becomes the de facto solution for anyone who cares more about getting to market and less about faux ‘scaling issues.’[1]
  8. Clouds enter Asia
    AWS goes to Asia or a credible competitor arises there capturing mind share and further expanding the global reach of cloud computing providers.  Conversely, clouds entering Asia realize that it’s a fragmented market with expensive intra-country bandwidth, making cost effective traction difficult on a cross-Pacific Rim basis.

 


1. I would be remiss if I didn’t mention that we’re leading the charge with one of our latest offerings, Cloud Connect, that allows cross-connecting dedicated servers to your GoGrid cloud.

GoGrid CEO’s 10 Predictions for Cloud Computing in 2009

Tuesday, December 16th, 2008 by

fortune_cookie A few weeks ago, I posted my 2009 Cloud Computing predictions. I already had one of my predictions validated (regarding VC funding – #3) with GoGrid partner, RightScale, receiving $13M in funding this week. (Congrats to them!). So I figured that I would ask GoGrid’s CEO, John Keagy, for his Cloud Computing predictions for 2009. What I received from him is verbatim (I know that I can always count on John to provide solid insight coupled with some humor).

John’s predictions are as follows:

  1. Asking “is the Enterprise ready for the Cloud” will be analogized to “the Internet is a fad”
  2. There will be some Cloud security breaches that will become super high profile
  3. Questioning the security of the Cloud will become less vogue
  4. The demand on companies to develop Cloud strategies will be likened to Y2K certification
  5. Cloud strategies will be proven to be more important than Y2K certification
  6. SAN storage will not emerge as being relevant to Cloud Computing
  7. NoHardware.com will illuminate the spirit of the Cloud movement
  8. RackSpace stock will claw back to $10.00
  9. Al Gore will announce he invented Cloud Computing
  10. “Cloud Computing will ______fill in the blank______”

I love the fact that John shoots from the hip with many of these predictions. But there are several points here that warrant a bit more commentary from me (are you surprised?).

  1. The “Cloud” is not a fad, nor is “the Internet.” In fact, the Internet, in many aspects, it the largest Cloud Infrastructure out there. Read Reuven Cohen’s post on this subject. So using basic logic I learned in high school: IF “internet is a fad” is a false statement, AND, “the Internet is a huge Cloud Infrastructure” is a true statement, THEN we can infer that “Cloud Computing is a fad” is a false statement. (Not sure how bullet proof my inferences and assumptions are but you should get my point here.)
  2. Everyone is holding Cloud Computing under a microscope. Every little “glitch” or “downtime” will be amplified 10-fold. However, I agree that there will be a breach that gets public attention that will cause everyone to step on the brakes a bit, but then move forward as before with “lessons learned.”
  3. People love picking apart things that are new. It’s an obvious statement that security is a big deal, within the Cloud or not. So, as the hype dies down, “security” will be just another check box right after “save money.”
  4. It is inevitable that as companies restructure from an organizational and financial perspective and undergo drastic re-engineering that Cloud Computing will be one of those technologies that will be forefront in many strategies. John likens it to Y2K compliance – the Cloud must be part of your 2009 strategy for success.
  5. Y2K certification was required to ensure that the software/hardware within businesses didn’t collapse when 2000 came around. Cloud Computing goes beyond this because it affects your bottom line and profitability in so many areas. Sure, in Y2K your systems could have collapsed but you didn’t have a choice: you had to comply. With 2009, you not only need survive but also try to squeak out a profit in the process. Y2K was a requirement, Cloud Computing is an optional component to a successful company business and infrastructure strategy. If complying also means survival and profit, then it IS required.
  6. Cloud Storage offerings will continue to grow, eliminating the need for dedicated physical storage devices (SANs) within the Cloud. SAN technology itself is old, costly and doesn’t work well with the times. Using a combination of iSCSI/NAS might be a better, more cost effective solution.
  7. “Hardware? We don’t need no stinkin’ hardware!” Companies will start recycling (hopefully) their old bare-metal servers (in various creative ways) and will move to the Cloud. Get some ideas on how to “dispose” of your old hardware at NoHardware.com .
  8. RackSpace did a few amazing things last year. They had one of the only technology IPO’s in 2008. That is a huge accomplishment (kudos to them). As of this writing, RackSpace (RAX) is trading at $5.73/share. Not too far to go to get back to their IPO price of $12.50. Also, their recent acquisition of companies for more Cloud services is compelling.
  9. Wait, didn’t he also invent the Internet? Seriously though, Cloud Computing goes a long way with the Green aspect of computing. There is less power consumed and less computer parts needing to be recycled (as they are virtualized). Save the planet!
  10. …be the silver bullet to slow or stop the recession? …enable companies to maintain profitability? …bring government into the 21st century? What do YOU think Cloud Computing will do in 2009?

(more…) «GoGrid CEO’s 10 Predictions for Cloud Computing in 2009»