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Posts Tagged ‘Drupal’

 

GoGrid a Great Hosting Choice for Bloggers – Says Blogging.org

Thursday, September 20th, 2012 by

This week, Blogging.org posted an article and infographic (we LOVE infographics) related to hosting and blogging – “Top 25 Hosting Companies for Bloggers.” Over the past month, the Blogging.org staff has been surveying over 5600 bloggers to help define what hosting providers are best for hosting a blog.

We are pleased to announce that out of the thousands of hosting provider choices out there, GoGrid was in the Top 25 and of those 25, among only a handful of cloud infrastructure providers.

It’s important when selecting a provider to host your blog to consider the type of hosting you will use as there can be a variety of differences to support your WordPress, Drupal, TypePad or other blogging platform. Having tried a variety of these options, I recommend going a more “dedicated” route via cloud or physical servers where you get guaranteed performance, in fact, my personal WordPress blog is hosted on GoGrid.

Hosting a blog on GoGrid is easy. From pricing to control, we believe it is important to have understandable pricing, straight-forward deployment and no-nonsense management so that you can focus on your most important objective, creating content for your blog. You can deploy a GoGrid cloud server in minutes starting at $18 a month and this is for a cloud server dedicated to you.

Also, we have a Community GSI (GoGrid Server Image) that is preconfigured for WordPress. As a GoGrid user, simply search for “WordPress” from the GoGrid Management Portal, and you will see the image. Use this image to deploy a cloud server in literally minutes.

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(more…) «GoGrid a Great Hosting Choice for Bloggers – Says Blogging.org»

New & Updated GoGrid Partner Server Images (PGSIs)

Tuesday, June 1st, 2010 by

At GoGrid, we firmly believe that having a rich and developing Partner ecosystem is critical to not only our success but also our customers. GoGrid Partners bring an incredible amount of value-added tools and services in the form of what we call PGSIs (Partner GoGrid Server Images) and we work with them closely to ensure that our joint offerings provide as much value as possible. If you haven’t explored the GoGrid Exchange, I encourage you to do so as we have a variety of tailored solutions to meet a wide variety of needs.

GoGrid_exchange

Categories for PGSIs currently include: Software & Applications, Development & Testing, Disaster Recovery & Backup, Cloud Management, Security, Monitoring & Reporting and more. Also, we are actively looking for new technology-enablers in the form of Partners so if you have a SaaS or PaaS offering that you would like to potentially be included in the GoGrid Exchange, simply fill out this form and we will start you on your way. All of our current partners are listed here.

Have you used a Partner GSI? If so, every Partner Server Image has a rating and comments section so that you can Review any of the images that you use. We hope that you will provide feedback as it helps us and our partners better evaluate the usefulness of their images on GoGrid.

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NEW Partner Images

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GoGrid Exchange: BitNami Open Source Web Applications Images Available

Tuesday, December 15th, 2009 by

A few months ago, we introduced MyGSIs (personal server images) which allow users to create custom personal GSI (GoGrid Server Images) with all of their code, applications and data. These personal server images are then compressed and stored in GoGrid’s Cloud Storage for use later instantiating copies of those MyGSIs within a user’s GoGrid cloud. Building upon that framework, backend structure and concept, we have released Partner GSIs and the GoGrid Exchange.

A Partner GSI appears in the same list of servers or sandboxes available for deployment. GoGrid has a growing number of partners, each of which specialize in a variety of capabilities including internet security, backup, monitoring, web applications, compliance and application scaling. New partners are being added regularly so be sure to check the GoGrid Partner page for additions. Also, a new “microsite”, called the GoGrid Exchange, will be launching shortly where you can get detailed information about Partners and the images they are providing.

To use a Partner GSI, simply select it from the server list as you are creating a new GoGrid cloud server. Do note that some partners charge an additional amount for using their pre-packaged GSI. If you use a Partner GSI that has some sort of “token based billing” attached to it, you will receive a charge for the use of that server in your next billing statement. Also, even if you use a Partner GSI that has a billing token assigned to it for an hour (or more), you are charged the full amount associated with that image. There is no partial or fractional billing for Partner GSIs. Partner images will show a different “owner” (see the screenshot below).

BitNami Open Source Web Applications

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GoGrid and BitNami have partnered to make open source web applications easy to deploy on GoGrid. The BitNami GSIs make it fast and easy to run web applications for evaluation, development or production purposes. They are fully configured, so you can start using the application immediately after loading the GSI to your GoGrid account.

(more…) «GoGrid Exchange: BitNami Open Source Web Applications Images Available»

How to Install Drupal on a GoGrid Cloud Server in Less than 15 Minutes

Friday, August 1st, 2008 by

drupal_logo

NOTE: We are currently revising this article. Please bear with us as we modify the content below for improvement.

Content Management Systems (CMS’s) are all the rage these days because of their unique ability to manage and deliver so many different types of media. The ability to create community-based websites with permission-based access and the ability to dynamically deliver different media formats and content can allow users to easily develop websites, online communities or internal intranets in a matter of minutes. Drupal, winner of dozens of open-source application awards, is one of the best and most popular Content Management Systems available today. The basic installation allows users to create online blogs, forums, wikis, books and newsletters, all of which can be privately managed by individuals or groups depending on how you set up the available permissions levels.

Of course, Drupal installs are fully supported on GoGrid. So, before you jump in and install Drupal, be sure that you have a GoGrid account set up. If you simply want to give Drupal a try within a Cloud Hosting environment, then with a new GoGrid account, you could create a GoGrid server in a few minutes and then spend the rest of your time (after the 15 minutes of setup) getting to know Drupal. Once you get your Drupal install dialed in, you might want to keep it so GoGrid makes it easy with pay-as-you-go billing and volume pricing as well. If you just wanted to test out your install skills and simply play around with Drupal on GoGrid, you can delete your cloud server(s) and use GoGrid for something else. It’s your call.

To start, simply deploy a GoGrid server through the http://my.gogrid.com customer portal. In this example, we’ll use a RHEL 4.5-based LAMP stack since it has all the software packages needed for a Drupal installation already installed.

  1. Click on the “+” button once you’ve logged in, then select “Web/App Server”. Enter a friendly name for your server, such as “Drupal” or the domain name you’ll use once your server is configured. Enter a quick description of the server and select an IP address (our new IP suggest function will suggest one automatically for you). If you already have a GoGrid server instance that runs your website and you want to install Drupal in a sub-directory or sub-domain, skip down to the second half of this article.
  2. Next, select the operating system to run your Drupal installation on. Drupal can run on either Windows or Linux machines, but in this example we’ll use a Linux-based RHEL 4.5 server image. Please note that Drupal will not run on MSSQL, so using a Linux-based distribution is easier to manage out of the box. If you wish to run Drupal on a Windows server, you will have to manually install PHP 4 or 5 with MySQL or PostgreSQL to run alongside IIS.
  3. Select the amount of RAM dedicated to your server. Depending on the amount of traffic you’re expecting, you may want to allocate a good amount of RAM to your server. I’m choosing to go with a 1GB server.
  4. Select the server image you want to deploy. In this case, I’ll be using a LAMP stack. (For Windows servers, you may want to select a Windows 2003-based operating systems with IIS and MSSQL Express installed on the server image, then install PHP and MySQL or PostgreSQL.)
  5. Click on “Save” and your server will be deployed within a matter of minutes.
  6. Once your server’s light turns green, click on the new Drupal server and then select the “Passwords” button at the left. This will take you to the login information for your server.

Now that a server has been deployed, you can go ahead and connect to it remotely via SSH. If you work on a Windows machine, you can download the PuTTY client to connect to a Linux Server. If you’re on a Mac or a Linux machine, you can open your terminal and SSH directly to the IP address of the new GoGrid server.

  1. SSH to the new server and log in using the username and password credentials located on the “Passwords” page in the GoGrid portal. In my examples, I will use the IP address 208.113.93.249. Replace this IP address throughout this document with the IP of the server you just deployed: (more…) «How to Install Drupal on a GoGrid Cloud Server in Less than 15 Minutes»