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Posts Tagged ‘Database’

 

The Top 3 Private Networking Use Cases for CloudLink

Tuesday, April 2nd, 2013 by

Public clouds are fantastic for a majority of infrastructure use cases. And interconnectivity between clouds enables myriad solutions to empower businesses to have multiple synchronized points of presence across the world. Companies can easily set up connections that traverse the public Internet as a means to transmit and potentially synchronize data between cloud data centers. But these connections need to be reliable and more often than not, private.

CloudLink private network between cloud data centers

CloudLink private network between cloud data centers

With public network connections between clouds, users are at the mercy of hops and latency. For example, data may take one route with a particular number of hops, and a second later, may follow a completely different path and take a longer or shorter amount of time based on the connection.

In terms of securing the transport, some companies rely on point-to-point VPN connections using a hardware or software solution or some combination of the two. However, these solutions are also constrained by the connection and have limited speeds.

There are some scenarios or use cases that warrant using dedicated private networking to join geographically dispersed clouds. This is where GoGrid’s CloudLink service comes into play.

GoGrid’s CloudLink is a data center interconnect product—a redundant 10 Gbps pipe that is isolated to GoGrid traffic only. CloudLink enables private network traffic between different servers in GoGrid’s US data centers. As part of our “Complex Infrastructure Made Easy” mission, we designed this service to be basic yet powerful and still meet the needs of demanding organizations. Because this is a private network, much like the private network within GoGrid’s standard cloud infrastructure, there are no bandwidth costs. You simply decide on the connection speed (10 Mbps, 100 Mbps, or 1 Gbps), configure your connection, and pay for just the dedicated connection. (more…) «The Top 3 Private Networking Use Cases for CloudLink»

Press Release & Case Study: Martini Media Delivers Prized Consumer to Advertisers Using GoGrid’s Big Data Solution

Wednesday, May 9th, 2012 by

Hitting the wires in the cloud this morning was our announcement of Martini Media’s customer success story. When we work with our customers, we discover a lot of innovation at work and throughout the process, we assist in crafting the best cloud solution wherever possible. Martini Media’s unique digital platform that advertisers use to reach affluent consumers is a fantastic example of how Big Data and cloud computing can be used to drive business success.

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In case you missed the Press Release, it is available here as well as below. But I encourage you, especially if you are looking for a Big Data solution, to download the Martini Media case study and then talk with one of our Cloud Solutions Architects. Through the use of our Big Data solution, hosted within the GoGrid cloud, Martini Media has been able to:

  • Support 100 percent annual growth
  • Realize the performance benefits of Big Data and the cost advantages of cloud computing
  • Serve targeted ads in as little as 150 milliseconds
  • Reduce latency and increase throughput speed

Case Study - Martini Media - Funnel image

And if you need a primer on Big Data, where it came from and where it can take you, I highly recommend these two articles by GoGrid’s Rupert Tagnipes: (more…) «Press Release & Case Study: Martini Media Delivers Prized Consumer to Advertisers Using GoGrid’s Big Data Solution»

Under The Radar 2012 Recap & Analysis – Summing Up Some Secret Startup Sauce (Part 2)

Thursday, May 3rd, 2012 by

I recently attended Under the Radar 2012 as GoGrid was a sponsor of this event. As there were several tracks, Michael Sheehan and I split the tracks and I covered Infrastructure, Database Scalability and Big Data. Michael covered Mobile Access, Infrastructure, Performance Monitoring, PaaS in Part 1.  Overall, the presenting companies have some compelling ideas and it gives an indicator as to the new thinking happening in Silicon Valley. The trends that I noticed were: a continued interest in private clouds, the increase in adoption of Openstack and the prevalence integrating Big Data.

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If you never attended Under the Radar, the format is to have four startups that already have a real product present for 6 minutes and are then judged by a panel of experienced executives at more established companies. The presenters had to be companies that are actual startups with a unique value proposition and a real product that they are able to monetize. Alumni or companies that are already more established can also present as a “Grad Circle” member but they are not included in the awards presented at the end of the show. And like American Idol, the audience also has a vote on their favorites for each category.  I included the Judge’s choice and Audience choice for each category but also added my own choice which reflects my own opinion and not that of GoGrid.

Infrastructure

This category focused on companies that are delivering infrastructure or infrastructure management products. So this would include services that could offer up infrastructure components (like compute, network, and storage) or even tools for managing configurations and deployments. Not surprisingly, nearly all of them focus on the cloud as the operating model of choice.

Cloudscaling – This company focuses on delivering an amazon-like cloud using Openstack. Their solution is comprised of Open Cloud OS, which is a product grade version of Openstack, Cloudblocks, a comprehensive architecture for cloud services and Hardware Blueprints, which are templates for physical hardware. Customers can leverage this solution to deploy a public or private cloud in their own DC.

(more…) «Under The Radar 2012 Recap & Analysis – Summing Up Some Secret Startup Sauce (Part 2)»

Under the Radar 2012 Recap & Analysis – Summing up Some Secret Startup Sauce (Part 1)

Wednesday, May 2nd, 2012 by

Last week’s Under the Radar 2012 conference (UTR) provided me and other attendees with a glimpse of what’s going to be hot in the coming year from a startup and technology standpoint. Take your pick from the following hot-list of terms: Big Data, analytics, mobile, enterprise, private cloud, security and platforms. They are all intertwined in some way or another.

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The format of UTR is fun, one of the MC’s described it as the American Idol for Startups. Basically, each startup (which have been in stealth mode and only just coming from behind the curtains) had 6 minutes to do an “elevator pitch” describing their product or service, how it works, why it is important and what they are looking to achieve. The startups were grouped by a theme (Mobile Access, Infrastructure, Performance Monitoring, PaaS, Database Scalability, Cloud Services and Big Data) and there were 4 companies being judged within each category. And what about the judges? Akin to the American Idol style, they were a collection of industry experts who asked poignant and humorous questions to drill deeper into the presentation pitch. The judges then selected their choice as the winning company, and the audience got to weigh in as well via a mobile text vote.

This marked the 3rd year that GoGrid sponsored UTR and the 2nd year having GoGrid CMO Jeffrey Samuels as a judge on one of the startup panels (“Performance Monitoring”). And several of us from GoGrid (including Rupert Tagnipes who provides his analysis of the Infrastructure, Database Scalability and Big Data sessions he covered in his Part 2 article) attended the sessions to see what upcoming technology trends were emerging, what companies were concerned about and what direction we are all heading. Personally, I attended the Mobile Access, Performance Monitoring and PaaS sessions and my analysis and personal winner choices for these sessions are below (note: my choices are my own opinion and not that of GoGrid.)

From the sessions that I saw, there seemed to be a clear trend of enterprise mobility, security, data analysis and simply “making things easier.” Also, a majority of the companies presenting seemed to have well vetted business plans, were monetizing and actually have customers and users. This is obviously a big difference from those wonderful “dot-com” days when you really didn’t need anything and VCs simply threw money at you. Conversely, while supposedly coming out of stealth-mode, most of these presenting companies were well down the path of success. The sections below include the Judge’s Winner, the Audience Winner, and My Choice.

(more…) «Under the Radar 2012 Recap & Analysis – Summing up Some Secret Startup Sauce (Part 1)»

The Big Data Revolution – Part 2 – Enter the Cloud

Wednesday, March 21st, 2012 by

In Part 1 of this Big Data series, I provided a background on the origins of Big Data.

But What is Big Data?

Port Vell Barcelona

The problem with using the term “Big Data” is that it’s used in a lot of different ways. One definition is that Big Data is any data set that is too large for on-hand data management tools. According to Martin Wattenberg, a scientist at IBM, “The real yardstick … is how it [Big Data] compares with a natural human limit, like the sum total of all the words that you’ll hear in your lifetime.” Collecting that data is a solvable problem, but making sense of it, (particularly in real time), is the challenge that technology tries to solve. This new type of technology is often listed under the title of “NoSQL” and includes distributed databases that are a departure from relational databases like Oracle and MySQL. These are systems that are specifically designed to be able to parallelize compute, distribute data, and create fault tolerance on a large cluster of servers. Some examples of NoSQL projects and software are: Hadoop, Cassandra, MongoDB, Riak and Membase.

The techniques vary, but there is a definite distinction between SQL relational databases and their NoSQL brethren. Most notably, NoSQL systems share the following characteristics:

  • Do not use SQL as their primary query language
  • May not require fixed table schemas
  • May not give full ACID guarantees (Atomicity, Consistency, Isolation, Durability)
  • Scale horizontally

Because of the lack of ACID, NoSQL is used when performance and real-time results are more important than consistency. For example, if a company wants to update their website in real time based on an analysis of the behaviors of a particular user interaction with the site, they will most likely turn to NoSQL to solve this use case.

However, this does not mean that relational databases are going away. In fact, it is likely that in larger implementations, NoSQL and SQL will function together. Just as NoSQL was designed to solve a particular use case, so do relational databases solve theirs. Relational databases excel at organizing structured data and is the standard for serving up ad-hoc analytics and business intelligence reporting. In fact, Apache Hadoop even has a separate project called Sqoop that is designed to link Hadoop with structured data stores. Most likely, those who implement NoSQL will maintain their relational databases for legacy systems and for reporting off of their NosQL clusters.

(more…) «The Big Data Revolution – Part 2 – Enter the Cloud»