Posts Tagged ‘Community Server Image’

 

GoGrid a Great Hosting Choice for Bloggers – Says Blogging.org

Thursday, September 20th, 2012 by

This week, Blogging.org posted an article and infographic (we LOVE infographics) related to hosting and blogging – “Top 25 Hosting Companies for Bloggers.” Over the past month, the Blogging.org staff has been surveying over 5600 bloggers to help define what hosting providers are best for hosting a blog.

We are pleased to announce that out of the thousands of hosting provider choices out there, GoGrid was in the Top 25 and of those 25, among only a handful of cloud infrastructure providers.

It’s important when selecting a provider to host your blog to consider the type of hosting you will use as there can be a variety of differences to support your WordPress, Drupal, TypePad or other blogging platform. Having tried a variety of these options, I recommend going a more “dedicated” route via cloud or physical servers where you get guaranteed performance, in fact, my personal WordPress blog is hosted on GoGrid.

Hosting a blog on GoGrid is easy. From pricing to control, we believe it is important to have understandable pricing, straight-forward deployment and no-nonsense management so that you can focus on your most important objective, creating content for your blog. You can deploy a GoGrid cloud server in minutes starting at $18 a month and this is for a cloud server dedicated to you.

Also, we have a Community GSI (GoGrid Server Image) that is preconfigured for WordPress. As a GoGrid user, simply search for “WordPress” from the GoGrid Management Portal, and you will see the image. Use this image to deploy a cloud server in literally minutes.

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Speeding Things Up in the Cloud with NGINX

Monday, March 26th, 2012 by

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It’s been no secret to us in the high-performance, web server in-crowd that NGINX (pronounced “engine-x”) has been taking the webhosting world by storm for the last several years; *sites like WordPress, Facebook, Hulu, Github, SourceForge and more have been offloading some or many functions onto NGINX. I had originally been exposed to NGINX whilst researching for a higher-performance web server that was 64-bit friendlier than Apache, and that was did not use single threads. Apache has an enormous memory footprint on 64-bit systems and is a single-threaded application.

NGINX is a very flexible HTTP server that can also serve as a reverse proxy, load balancer, caching server, and an IMAP/POP3 proxy. Unlike Apache, however, the configuration is a little bit more involved and can be a big change for Apache loyalists.

In this is example, NGINX will be configured as a full webserver with PHP support. My goal when conjuring this project was to make a pre-configured Community GSI on the GoGrid Exchange with as little modification as possible to ensure a “pure” environment. If you’re anything like me, you might tremble at the thought of even using a typical, pre-configured server with a LAMP stack; I personally like setting things up from scratch, but there’ve been plenty of situations where I would’ve preferred a pre-configured solution. Hopefully I can capture the essence of my intentions.

One thing I should note before I get started is that NGINX does not have a module for PHP the way Apache does; PHP must be run using the FastCGI methodology. Much like the way you would pass requests to a Java container or reverse proxy, so must we for PHP.

The first thing I should mention is that I’m using the EPEL and IUS repositories to for the latest versions of NGINX and PHP-FPM. IUS is the official repository for RHEL/CentOS as referenced by PHP.net. Using these 2 repositories will not alter any existing packages on your system.

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How to Monitor Your Windows 2008 Server on GoGrid with Cacti 0.8.7g

Tuesday, June 14th, 2011 by

This is the 3rd and final post in my setup and use of the GoGrid Community GSI server for Cacti Monitoring. In my first post, “Set Up A Cacti Monitoring Server in Minutes with this GoGrid Community Server Image,,” I covered how to deploy Cacti in your GoGrid environment using a Community GSI. My second post, “How to Monitor Your Ubuntu Server on GoGrid in 6 Steps Using Cacti 0.8.7g,” I discussed how to initiate monitoring of your GoGrid Ubuntu server. Now to round things off, I want to show you how to link up your Cacti monitoring server to a Windows Server 2008 server on your GoGrid network. The base install of Cacti 0.8.7g will allow you to monitor the server’s bandwidth utilization, Ethernet errors, number of logged in users, and total number of processes. There are other templates available to monitor other components and services on your Windows server, but they require using an additional SNMP service beyond the Microsoft SNMP service. My blog post won’t get into the latter, but I will cover the former.

Objectives:

  1. Configure GoGrid private network connectivity on Windows 2008 Server and test connectivity to Cacti server
  2. Configure and start Microsoft SNMP service on your Windows 2008 Server
  3. Add new Cacti device
  4. Create graphs to log Local Connection and Local Connection 2 bandwidth and errors, Logged in Users, and server processes

Configure GoGrid private network connectivity on Windows 2008 Server and test connectivity to Cacti server

Below we see that we have a server (“Web2”) deployed on GoGrid with a public IP. Let’s log into this server and configure the private network with a private IP from the same subnet of the Cacti Monitor server. As I described in my previous post – I am using the prescribed private IP subnet from my GoGrid portal, contained under the List tab and then under Network – Private Network.

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How To Monitor your Ubuntu Server on GoGrid in 6 Steps Using Cacti 0.8.7g

Wednesday, June 1st, 2011 by

In my previous post, “Set Up A Cacti Monitoring Server in Minutes with this GoGrid Community Server Image”, I showed how to use a Community GSI to quickly and easily set up a monitoring server on GoGrid running Cacti. In this second part of the Cacti GoGrid Community GSI blog series, I would like to walk you through how I connected my Cacti server up to an Ubuntu server (a node in my Glusterfs file storage array). First we will review the objectives we are looking to achieve and then dive into each one.

Objectives:

  1. Confirm private network configuration on both Cacti server and Ubuntu server, and test connectivity.
  2. Enable SNMP server and configure SNMP rocommunity string on Ubuntu servers.
  3. Establish SNMP agent listening IP address
  4. Create “Device” in Cacti console and confirm SNMP connectivity to Ubuntu server
  5. Create Graphs – CPU usage, Load Average, Memory Usage, PING Latency, Processes, Eth0 Traffic, Eth1 Traffic
  6. Repeat process for other Ubuntu servers in your network.

Confirm private network configuration on both Cacti server and Ubuntu server, and test connectivity

On GoGrid, you have the ability to network your servers together over a private network allocated to your account. (Note: all private networking within GoGrid is free.) We need to take advantage of this secure communication method to allow your Cacti server SNMP access to your servers. I recommend you use the private network IP range that is specified in your account – under the “List” tab then “Network”.

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Set Up a Cacti Monitoring Server in Minutes with this GoGrid Community Server Image

Thursday, May 19th, 2011 by

One of the best open-source tools ever created and maintained is Cacti. Cacti can be used to monitor and log critical information for your servers, applications and other network devices. The monitored data can be graphed in a variety of ways and becomes a valuable resource when troubleshooting problems and projecting future resource utilization.

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However, the initial configuration can take hours to complete, not including the server OS install process and pre-configuration.

Deploying Cacti Easily in GoGrid

To make this process a bit easier for GoGrid users, I have performed the routine installation of Cacti 0.8.6 along with the package requirements within a Community GSI (GoGrid Server Image). Also, I have added DenyHosts for added system level protection. The ssh_banner will provide the details of what was configured on the system. All that needs to be done is going into your account within the GoGrid portal, clicking on the Add button and filter for “Cacti”.

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