KML_FLASHEMBED_PROCESS_SCRIPT_CALLS

Posts Tagged ‘cGSI’

 

How to Create a GoGrid Cloud Server Image for Rapid Scalability

Thursday, January 31st, 2013 by

Let’s say that you have fully configured a Cloud Server running on GoGrid. You’re so proud of your achievement that you want to share your configuration with your team or perhaps even with the GoGrid community. And let’s imagine that you or your company has developed a software solution that you’d like to monetize within a Public Cloud. Well, the process of creating and sharing a GoGrid Cloud Server Image (GSI) is easy and literally takes just a few minutes.

image

Similar to our previous “How To” article and video (“How to Select, Configure, & Deploy a GoGrid Cloud Server in Minutes”), the process of creating a GSI is straightforward and can be simplified into 3 easy steps:

1. Select
2. Save
3. Share

Before I show you how easy it is to create a GoGrid Cloud Server Image, here are some ways you might use it:

  • To reduce setup and configuration times for new servers
  • To enable rapid horizontal scaling of servers
  • To create a back-up repository of your GoGrid servers
  • To share your server configuration with your team for future cloud deployments
  • To monetize a software solution

(more…) «How to Create a GoGrid Cloud Server Image for Rapid Scalability»

How to Select, Configure, & Deploy a GoGrid Cloud Server in Minutes

Thursday, January 10th, 2013 by

If you visit the GoGrid homepage, you’ll be greeted with the following headline:

We make cloud infrastructure easy. Really easy.

image

But without trying our cloud infrastructure service, how can you really know what “easy” means? It can be completely subjective and open to interpretation. Even so, we stand firmly by our statement. It IS easy because it simply boils down to 3 action words:

1. select
2. configure
3. deploy.

Don’t just take my word for it though. Your best bet is to test it out yourself. (Here’s a hint: If you’re new to GoGrid, contact one of our Cloud Experts, mention this blog post, and get a $100 service credit to see if we’re right.)

Almost as easy as watching a video

I understand you may not have time to do some hands-on testing so we’ve put together a short (3 minute 40 second) video that walks you through how to: (more…) «How to Select, Configure, & Deploy a GoGrid Cloud Server in Minutes»

Create a Basho Riak Cluster on GoGrid

Monday, July 9th, 2012 by

Basho is a GoGrid partner and responsible for the open-source Riak project. If you are not familiar with Riak, it is a well regarded open-source distributed database. It was built off of the Dynamo concept so it is often compared to Cassandra and Amazon Dynamo DB.

Riak is used as a fast, fault-tolerant distributed database. Companies like Mozilla use it for storing and analyzing beta testing results. Mozilla needed a solution to help improve the user experience and that would allow them to store large amounts of data very quickly. Another example of a company using Riak is Bump which uses Riak to scale and manage massive amounts of data sent between it’s millions of users. Riak is used to store elements of past user conversations so that communication history is readily accessible to users.

basho_logo2

Basho Riak version 1.1.4 is now available as a GoGrid Community Server Image (CGSI). You can find it when you launch a virtual machine and search for “Riak”. This image is available in all our data centers. This CGSI contains the open source version so support is only available via the community site and will not have all the features present in the Enterprise version. However, you can use this image to either run a proof of concept (POC) of Riak to see if it will meet your needs or to run a small cluster. These will run on GoGrid’s high performance VMs which have been shown to have significant performance advantages over other cloud implementations.

Riak_image

Why is GoGrid faster?

(more…) «Create a Basho Riak Cluster on GoGrid»

Speeding Things Up in the Cloud with NGINX

Monday, March 26th, 2012 by

clip_image001 clip_image002 clip_image004

It’s been no secret to us in the high-performance, web server in-crowd that NGINX (pronounced “engine-x”) has been taking the webhosting world by storm for the last several years; *sites like WordPress, Facebook, Hulu, Github, SourceForge and more have been offloading some or many functions onto NGINX. I had originally been exposed to NGINX whilst researching for a higher-performance web server that was 64-bit friendlier than Apache, and that was did not use single threads. Apache has an enormous memory footprint on 64-bit systems and is a single-threaded application.

NGINX is a very flexible HTTP server that can also serve as a reverse proxy, load balancer, caching server, and an IMAP/POP3 proxy. Unlike Apache, however, the configuration is a little bit more involved and can be a big change for Apache loyalists.

In this is example, NGINX will be configured as a full webserver with PHP support. My goal when conjuring this project was to make a pre-configured Community GSI on the GoGrid Exchange with as little modification as possible to ensure a “pure” environment. If you’re anything like me, you might tremble at the thought of even using a typical, pre-configured server with a LAMP stack; I personally like setting things up from scratch, but there’ve been plenty of situations where I would’ve preferred a pre-configured solution. Hopefully I can capture the essence of my intentions.

One thing I should note before I get started is that NGINX does not have a module for PHP the way Apache does; PHP must be run using the FastCGI methodology. Much like the way you would pass requests to a Java container or reverse proxy, so must we for PHP.

The first thing I should mention is that I’m using the EPEL and IUS repositories to for the latest versions of NGINX and PHP-FPM. IUS is the official repository for RHEL/CentOS as referenced by PHP.net. Using these 2 repositories will not alter any existing packages on your system.

(more…) «Speeding Things Up in the Cloud with NGINX»

How to Monitor Your Windows 2008 Server on GoGrid with Cacti 0.8.7g

Tuesday, June 14th, 2011 by

This is the 3rd and final post in my setup and use of the GoGrid Community GSI server for Cacti Monitoring. In my first post, “Set Up A Cacti Monitoring Server in Minutes with this GoGrid Community Server Image,,” I covered how to deploy Cacti in your GoGrid environment using a Community GSI. My second post, “How to Monitor Your Ubuntu Server on GoGrid in 6 Steps Using Cacti 0.8.7g,” I discussed how to initiate monitoring of your GoGrid Ubuntu server. Now to round things off, I want to show you how to link up your Cacti monitoring server to a Windows Server 2008 server on your GoGrid network. The base install of Cacti 0.8.7g will allow you to monitor the server’s bandwidth utilization, Ethernet errors, number of logged in users, and total number of processes. There are other templates available to monitor other components and services on your Windows server, but they require using an additional SNMP service beyond the Microsoft SNMP service. My blog post won’t get into the latter, but I will cover the former.

Objectives:

  1. Configure GoGrid private network connectivity on Windows 2008 Server and test connectivity to Cacti server
  2. Configure and start Microsoft SNMP service on your Windows 2008 Server
  3. Add new Cacti device
  4. Create graphs to log Local Connection and Local Connection 2 bandwidth and errors, Logged in Users, and server processes

Configure GoGrid private network connectivity on Windows 2008 Server and test connectivity to Cacti server

Below we see that we have a server (“Web2”) deployed on GoGrid with a public IP. Let’s log into this server and configure the private network with a private IP from the same subnet of the Cacti Monitor server. As I described in my previous post – I am using the prescribed private IP subnet from my GoGrid portal, contained under the List tab and then under Network – Private Network.

Selection_101

(more…) «How to Monitor Your Windows 2008 Server on GoGrid with Cacti 0.8.7g»