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Posts Tagged ‘AWS’

 

Amazon is Amazing! (From the GoGrid CEO)

Monday, April 25th, 2011 by

This blog post is long overdue but the recent events that affected customers using Amazon Web Services sparked an increased priority in my mind. I have long been an advocate of Amazon’s amazing efforts driving cloud computing to fruition. And the current unfortunate events have not changed my attitude towards them. Amazon is amazing!

From_the_CEO_GoGrid_logo_sm

Really amazing! And GoGrid is really thankful.

Thank goodness Werner Vogels keeps getting up on stage with incredible success stories. Werner’s slides featuring Amazon’s growth statistics are so awesome that I bet they make Al Gore jealous. And that isn’t a tongue-in-cheek quip because Al Gore gave birth to the Internet. This isn’t a tongue-in-cheek blog-post. This is a hearty high-five to Amazon from GoGrid. The convenient truth for GoGrid is that when Werner takes the stage, it feels like he’ll need a ladder to show us how incredible the adoption is of AWS.

Can you imagine a world without Amazon? The whole “cloud” revolution probably wouldn’t be happening. SalesForce had been doing their thing for about a decade but it wasn’t until Amazon Web Services geared up that the whole “cloud” thing started cranking.

  • No great brand-name company was going to bring cloud computing to market because they’ve been watching a bookstore eat their lunch now for years and they still haven’t done anything relevant. I’m talking about computing giants like IBM, HP, Dell, and Cisco or telecom service providers like AT&T and Verizon. Sun was gonna do something relevant about 2 years ago but Larry pulled the plug on that. Amazon has declared an entirely new style of computing that will define the future, and the big-names just seem to be watching. Wake up! What is going through your dino-minds? There is a new Sheriff in town. Do you still think that Amazon is just an attempt to sell excess bookstore infrastructure that they didn’t need at Christmas? Amazon-dot-com faced an incredible IT challenge and so they invented an entirely new style of massively multi-tenant, incredibly scalable, programmable, on-demand infrastructure. Smell the Java ©!
  • Countless technology start-ups would never have started. Amazon established an entirely new paradigm that has changed the game for entrepreneurs in several great ways. First of all, Amazon enables bunches of new businesses that simply couldn’t have existed even if they had the capital. The best examples of these are the companies that simply grew too fast to get their needs met without programmable and massively scalable on-demand infrastructure.
  • Amazon has done wonders for the psyche of entrepreneurs. Entrepreneurs feel empowered. There is a new consensus that a company can be started for almost nothing whereas it used to feel like a start-up needed $10,000,000. Entrepreneurs are liberated because they know that they can scale their cost of goods sold with their revenues and that they don’t need any CapEx. Amazon is a bigger friend to tech start-ups than venture capital and has become a comparable engine for growth in our economy.
  • OpenStack wouldn’t exist. OpenStack was invented to compete with Amazon. RackSpace never would have purchased SliceHost and jumped into the cloud game. RackSpace wouldn’t have needed a “cloud” strategy ‘cause their core business was doing great.
  • And last but not least, people wouldn’t care so much about GoGrid. We’re proud to have pioneered cloud computing alongside Amazon, but if we had done it alone it might be comparable to a tree falling in the forest. We had load balanced cloud servers years before Amazon, and load balancing is core to elasticity which is a defining attribute of cloud computing, but not as many people would have noticed. We also were way ahead of Amazon with on-demand Windows servers, real VLANs, dedicated servers, Hosted Private Cloud and bunches of other things but you probably wouldn’t be reading this blog-post if it weren’t for Amazon. We take great pride in having a feature-set that our customers and industry analysts alike consider to be the most comparable to Amazon’s. We’re headquartered in San Francisco and quite good at R&D ourselves and we also are pushing the industry forward. GoGrid got into the game trying to solve a different problem than Amazon, we were trying to automate managed hosting, but we’ve both ended up in nearly the same wonderful place…the cloud!

So thank you Amazon! You’ve done the World a great service!

(more…) «Amazon is Amazing! (From the GoGrid CEO)»

John Keagy, CEO – GoGrid, Featured in This Week in Cloud Computing Video Podcast

Monday, March 7th, 2011 by

Last week GoGrid CEO, John Keagy, was a guest on “This Week in Cloud Computing” hosted by Amanda Coolong & David Linthicum. The video podcast covered a variety of interesting topics including Fujitsu’s new cloud offering in Asia-Pac, Microsoft’s war of words with Google over Cloud Connect and Intel’s rumored client-aware cloud offerings. John Keagy weighs in with some very interesting thoughts on each of these topics. We’ve embedded the full episode for your viewing pleasure, but we’ve also included highlights and the discussion about GoGrid’s past, present and future!

Note: each of the clips below the main one will jump directly to the relevant content.

Full Episode

Highlights

Australia is the first country outside of Japan to roll out Fujitsu’s standardized cloud offering. Do you think the expansion of cloud computing in Asia-Pac will add a boom to business development?

(more…) «John Keagy, CEO – GoGrid, Featured in This Week in Cloud Computing Video Podcast»

Want to Understand how F5 Load Balancers Work on GoGrid? Read this Article from F5!

Friday, May 7th, 2010 by

Since the launch of GoGrid over 2 years ago, we have provided free F5 load balancing as part of our Cloud Infrastructure offering. Being able to provide load-balanced solutions in the cloud is critical to having a scalable environment and without F5′s load balancers, our service offering would be very different.

f5_devcentral

But understanding the nitty-gritty details of how the F5′s work within GoGrid is not something that most people understand. For the most part, customers are concerned that it simply works and works well, which it does. Yesterday, Lori MacVittie, the Technical Marketing Manager at F5, posted a technical article that does a great job explaining how the magic behind the scenes works with the F5 load balancers and GoGrid.

The article is available on F5′s DevCentral as well as below:

Cloud Load Balancing Fu for Developers Helps Avoid Scaling Gotchas

If you don’t know how scaling services work in a cloud environment you may not like the results

(more…) «Want to Understand how F5 Load Balancers Work on GoGrid? Read this Article from F5!»

Cloud News: Amazon Outage Thriller, EC2 Hacking & Microsoft Acquires Opalis for Cloud Management

Friday, December 11th, 2009 by

Whoops! Missed a day there. I was busy planning out events for 2010 for GoGrid! I realize now that this is somewhat difficult writing about Cloud News every day so I’m going to start something for Fridays called “This Week in Cloud” which will have some of the bigger Cloud Computing news stories that I came across. I may still do the regular “Cloud News” if there are events or items that warrant coverage. Without further ado, here’s what I read about that got my interest:

  • Amazon’s Data Center Outage Reads Like a Thriller
    “When an Amazon Web Services data center lost power early Wednesday, the company wrote about the unfolding event with the brevity and tension of one its bestselling pot boilers.” (Source: CIO/ComputerWorld)

    • Commentary: Ok, we all know that outages happen, whether in the cloud or not. The cloud is under intense scrutiny so when there is even the most minor of hiccups, people scream and yell and pull out their SLA’s and demand immediate recourse. It’s never fun when I read about an outage since we are all birds of a feather working towards a common good. The reason I linked to this article in particular is because of the nature in which it was written…truly like a technology thriller! The funny thing is, I have been through a few outages in various companies that I have worked for and they are never fun. You are torn in many directions of trying to find out internally what is going one, and figuring out the best way to communicate with customers in a way where they won’t freak out but still understand that an “event” is being actively working on. When there is an outage, it truly does unfold organically (and hopefully not catastrophically, causing a cascade effect). Third party monitoring is important as is a good backup and disaster recovery strategy. (GoGrid recently partnered with Stratonomic who provides real-time DR solutions.)  Regardless, the Amazon Data Center outage did not last long and everyone was back on track (but hopefully thinking about making their IT infrastructure more resilient). It was nice to see that GoGrid had (and still seems to have) the highest marks on the Apparent Networks Cloud Provider Scorecard.
  • Hackers Find a Home in Amazon’s EC2 Cloud
    “Security researchers have spotted the Zeus botnet running an unauthorized command and control center on Amazon’s EC2 cloud computing infrastructure. This marks the first time Amazon Web Services’ cloud infrastructure has been used for this type of illegal activity, according to Don DeBolt, director of threat research with HCL Technologies, a contractor that does security research for CA.” (Source: PCWorld)

    • Commentary: I don’t want to turn this into an AWS bashing, that is not my intent (even though they are a direct competitor to GoGrid). But this news (old by internet news speed standards) is important to look at. Hackers are an inquisitive (yet destructive) bunch. Recently, I heard about how some hackers created a service (called AutoWhaler) to pull account details from phishing sites. Now if that isn’t innovation, I don’t know what is! Seriously though, hackers can cause a variety of damage to infrastructures that are not protected and actively monitored. The problem is, they are so innovative (or perhaps “creative” is a better word), that it is often difficult to prevent or plan for intrusions within one’s infrastructure. Obviously this and other examples simply prove that while Cloud Computing can help many, we still have a ways to go. On the flipside, this same type of invasion could well have happened within a server farm of physical servers. It’s just the Cloud has the spotlight now.
  • Microsoft buys Opalis to strengthen cloud management capabilities
    “Moving to strengthen its management tools related to virtual environments, Microsoft Friday said that it has purchased IT process automation vendor Opalis for an undisclosed sum. Microsoft said the acquisition, which had been rumored for nearly two months, adds to its System Center portfolio needed tools that can manage highly automated and scalable virtual environments. The tools complement Microsoft’s strategy to stretch its management tools across on-premises environments and the cloud.” (source: NetworkWorld) (more…) «Cloud News: Amazon Outage Thriller, EC2 Hacking & Microsoft Acquires Opalis for Cloud Management»

Building a House in the Cloud – Cloudcenters vs. Infrastructure Web Services

Wednesday, January 14th, 2009 by

Last week, my colleague Randy Bias, introduced the concept of the “cloudcenter” and it has gotten some good commentary, traction and feedback. Most basically put, a cloudcenter (e.g., GoGrid) is a “datacenter in the Cloud” with features, systems, processes and functionality that sysadmins and IT Operations folks are accustomed to. But I feel that the concept needs to be explored a bit more as well as from some different angles.

cloudcenter-diagram

I attended a technology meetup on Tuesday night in San Francisco where GoGrid is a sponsor. People were packed elbow-to-elbow in the space and I had lots of time to talk about GoGrid and our vision of Cloud Computing to many. A few times, I was asked the common questions “How do you compare to Amazon EC2?” as well as “Are you a competitor to Amazon Web Services (AWS)?” To those people who asked, I gave the following answer (probably not as well articulated though):

Both Amazon and GoGrid are Cloud Infrastructure or Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) providers. We both reside within the bottom layer of the Cloud Pyramid, a term I coined last year to help explain Cloud Computing in an “over simplified” way. Both of our companies do essentially the same thing: providing elastic and dynamically scalable computing resources and infrastructure that is consumed on a self-service basis billed by usage. But how this infrastructure is provided is nuanced differently.

This broad definition warrants further explanation. First, my answer to the “competition” question. Personally, I don’t view AWS exactly as a competitor. They have provided incredible space validation as well as attracted new users to the Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) model. In fact, I would almost go as far as to categorize them as a “soft partner.” Here are a few reasons why I think this:

  • we share the same generalized space of Cloud Computing,
  • we offer similar feature-sets and functionality within the Cloud, and,
  • we are driving towards a common goal of moving IT infrastructure into a “greener,” more cost-effective and much more efficient environment.

(more…) «Building a House in the Cloud – Cloudcenters vs. Infrastructure Web Services»