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Posts Tagged ‘Amazon EC2’

 

InfoWorld covers GoGrid in “Cloud versus Cloud” article

Monday, July 21st, 2008 by

iwLogo2_2006 Peter Wayner, contributing editor of the InfoWorld Test Center, today posted a side-by-side comparison of 4 Cloud Computing providers: Amazon EC2, Google App Engine, GoGrid and AppNexus, titled “Cloud versus cloud: A guided tour of Amazon, Google, AppNexus, and GoGrid.” What was fairly obvious was that there isn’t a clear “winner” simply because Cloud Computing is so new and standards are still being written. What was clear, is that Wayner believes that GoGrid is “easy to use” and differentiates itself through the offering of both Windows and Linux cloud server images.

Wayner writes:

“GoGrid also has a wider variety of OS images ready to go. There is the usual collection of CentOS/Fedora and common LAMP stacks. If you need Windows, you can have Windows Server 2003 with IIS 6.0, and Microsoft SQL Server is available at extra cost. There are also images with Ruby on Rails, PostgreSQL, and the Facebook application server. These make it a bit easier to start up. “

Wayner also recorded a video of his analysis of GoGrid. Below he shows how a GoGrid cloud server can be easily and quickly deployed as well as some of the management features within the GoGrid control panel:

(more…) «InfoWorld covers GoGrid in “Cloud versus Cloud” article»

The Cloud Pyramid

Tuesday, June 24th, 2008 by

This insightful post on the RightScale blog recently got me thinking. The term “Cloud Computing” is much too vague. People want and need “slots” or “segments” where they can group things. This is how the mind operates through categorization and ordering. So, to possibly help with this, I would like to propose a “Cloud Pyramid” to help differentiate the various Cloud offerings out there.

Cloud Pyramid

There are other ways to display this hierarchy, however I elected to show it as a pyramid. For example, if one were to weight the graphic by the number of providers within each segment, the pyramid would be upside-down. The point here though is to show how these cloud segments build upon and are somewhat dependent upon each other. While they are directly related, they don’t require interdependence (e.g., a Cloud Application does not necessarily have to be built upon a Cloud Platform or Cloud Infrastructure). I would propose, however, that Cloud trends indicate that they will become more entwined over time.

Cloud Application

Within this part of the pyramid, users are truly restricted to only what the application is and can do. Some of the notable companies here are the public email providers (Gmail, Hotmail, Quicken Online, etc.). Almost any Software as a Service (SaaS) provider can be lumped into this group. Most retail consumers use the services within this Cloud. You get pre-defined functionality and you cannot much further than that. Applications are designed for ease of use and GTD (getting things done). SalesForce, a huge Cloud Application/SaaS provider that has led the way for hosted software, falls into this category as well, however, their force.com product does not. Even online banking offerings could be lumped into this group.

Characteristics:

(more…) «The Cloud Pyramid»

GoGrid Review in InfoWorld

Thursday, June 19th, 2008 by

iwLogo2_2006 Today, InfoWorld’s Tech Writer, Bill Snyder, brought GoGrid solidly into the race with Amazon’s EC2 with his article titled “Red Hat the latest proof that cloud computing is serious business.” Snyder, who has been following technology and the business of technology for 25 years, discusses GoGrid’s “point-and-click infrastructure” and its ease of use in this article.

While Bill mentions that cloud computing may not be ready for large-scale business or the enterprise, he does point out that it is a force to be reckoned with and that the services of GoGrid and Amazon’s EC now “will give a lot of users a chance to take cloud computing for a low-risk, real-world test drive.” I personally predict that the adoption of cloud computing and cloud infrastructure by the enterprise will be a slow uptake at first, most likely rolling out into skunkwork divisions, short-term projects or IT evaluation scenarios, but that within a few years, business not seriously considering “the cloud” will be behind in their technical and competitive advantages.

Snyder highlights a real-world GoGrid success (that I covered here) about how ScribbleLive was able to handle multiple million page view requests in a short amount of time during the Apple World Wide Developer’s Conference. He emphasized the importance of easy and quick scalability coupled with cost-effectiveness provided by GoGrid:

“ScribbleLive, a two-person operation, quickly scaled up using GoGrid, and was able to keep running with little or no loss of throughput. The price: $15 for a day of server time, plus bandwidth charges. Hmm. Maybe the folks at Mozilla, who tried to set a world’s record for downloads of the new Firefox browser but wound up crashing their site, could have done something similar.”

Simplicity is another key factor that Snyder outlines in his review, stating:

“In theory, at least, setting up servers on GoGrid seems almost too easy. Once a client signs up for the service, an IT staffer can point a browser to GoGrid’s site and choose a configuration from a variety of pull down menus. GoGrid supports Windows Server 2003, CentOS and Red Hat Enterprise Linux.”

(more…) «GoGrid Review in InfoWorld»

Facebook Application Hosting Comparison Matrix (Updated 2)

Monday, May 5th, 2008 by

8.27.08 – Note: Facebook and MySpace-enabled servers are currently unavailable on GoGrid. However, we have added other server images since the writing of this article. The table below has been slightly modified to reflect some changes. For a comparison of GoGrid to Amazon’s EC2, please see this page.

With the Facebook QuickStart Servers available now on GoGrid, we have received questions as to how the GoGrid service compares with others in the cloud computing and Facebook space. While this is not the “end-all” comparison, it does provide a point of reference between GoGrid, Amazon EC2 and Joyent.

Chart updated on 8/27/08.

GoGrid Amazon (EC2) Joyent
Windows Support YES NO NO
Linux Support YES YES NO
OpenSolaris Support NO NO YES
Graphical User Interface (GUI) YES NO NO
CPU 1 Xeon Core 1 Virtual Core 1/32 Xeon Core
RAM 1 GB 1.7 GB 512 MB
Storage Allotments (GB) 60 160 10
Full Root access YES YES YES
Load Balancing FREE $72/month NO
24×7 Support FREE $500/month NO
Price $72/month* $72/month FREE
Inbound data transfer (GB) FREE $0.10 500 recipients/hr
Outbound data transfer (GB) $0.25* $0.17 500 recipients/hr

*Pricing based on GoGrid Advanced Cloud and Transfer 200 GB plans

With GoGrid there are other choices as well for RAM and Storage allotments (1GB RAM servers have 60 GB disks and 2 GB RAM servers have 125GB disks). Key differentiators are the FREE support and Load Balancing offered by GoGrid as well as support for both Windows and Linux servers (Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4 and CentOS 4.4.) More OS images are added on a regular basis so check back regularly.

(more…) «Facebook Application Hosting Comparison Matrix (Updated 2)»

"Your GoGrid is all False Advertising!"

Friday, March 28th, 2008 by

quotable This note was sent to us by a new GoGrid user (Hareem Haque) and frankly it scared us. But then we read on further in the note:

“Honestly speaking. Your GoGrid is all false advertising. It does a whole lot more then what is stated on the site. I ran a CentOS 4.4 server yesterday for a brief but crucial period. The unit itself gave me no headaches. I simply installed all my apps. And off we were testing the app with our clients. Everything worked fine and flawlessly. Thanks to the load balancer we did some load tests. And I could not find anything bad about GoGrid. I am going to start moving my EC2 instance applications over to GoGrid. “

Hareem, who works in Telecommunications in Canada, currently has 4 Amazon Machine Images (AMI’s) running on Amazon’s EC2 (all clones) running as a clustered FTP server and is now in the process of replicating this environment on GoGrid. He set up a CentOS 4.4 server on GoGrid and installed vsftpd on it and ran some tests of 10 – 20MB Flash Video Files (.flv) , moving then to 2 – 100MB Window Media Video (.wmv) files and finally 1 – 1GB MPEG-4 (.mp4) file. He got a throughput of 10mbps with GoGrid and only 7mbps with EC2. With these solid benchmarks, he’s moving forward with more GoGrid servers now.

He also said he was extremely happy that there was no charge for the load-balancing and that it “came in handy.”

(more…) «"Your GoGrid is all False Advertising!"»