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Archive for the ‘Load Balancer’ Category

 

How To Control your Cloud Infrastructure Using the GoGrid iPhone Application

Thursday, May 10th, 2012 by

Cloud Computing is fantastic! Where else can you provision infrastructure on the fly, scale it up (add more CPU/RAM/Storage) and out (add more instances of cloud servers) and grow your infrastructure based on your business demands. At GoGrid, we believe in making complex infrastructure easy by providing you with tools to create, manage and scale your GoGrid cloud infrastructure using our web-based portal or programmatic API. But did you know that you can also create and manage your GoGrid cloud infrastructure while you are on the go using your iPhone? Back in 2010, we launched our iPhone application and we designed it to scale as we added new data centers. The application fully supports our San Francisco, Ashburn and Amsterdam data centers simply because we built the app on top of our API.

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Are you a mobile apps developer? I would love to see what magic you can do with the GoGrid API in making the next generation Android or iPad application. Feel free to leave a comment on this post.

So, how do you set up the GoGrid iPhone application once you have downloaded it from the iTunes App Store? It’s pretty easy so I wanted to show the steps on setting it up in this article.

Create an API Key within the GoGrid Web Portal

The first step it to create an API key within the GoGrid web portal. You need to have a GoGrid account for this. (For those who are new to GoGrid and want to test it out specifically with the iPhone application, go to the GoGrid sign-up page and in the “Promo Code” field, enter “GGiPhone1″ and receive a $100 service credit!) (more…) «How To Control your Cloud Infrastructure Using the GoGrid iPhone Application»

Riverbed Stingray 8.1 Now in the GoGrid Cloud!

Tuesday, February 7th, 2012 by

As of today, GoGrid has released multiple images of the leading software load balancer, Riverbed Stingray! The following images are available on the GoGrid Partner Exchange in both San Francisco and Amsterdam:

  • Riverbed 7.4 Simple Load Balancer 10 Mbps
  • Riverbed 8.1 Load Balancer 10 Mbps
  • Riverbed 8.1 Load Balancer 200 Mbps
  • Riverbed 8.1 Load Balancer 200 Mbps WAF

How to Configure Zeus’ New Load Balancer in the GoGrid Cloud

Wednesday, September 14th, 2011 by

Zeus is a new GoGrid partner that provides a software load balancing product as a partner image called “Zeus Load Balancer 200Mbps”. There are three immediate features that come to mind when thinking about how to leverage Zeus within GoGrid: Load Balancing, Failover and Clustering. Note that this first image is a preview with certain feature set. It contains the majority of Zeus features but is capped at two clustered servers and 200 Mbits of bandwidth. Additional images are expected to be released by the end of the year.

This tutorial assumes that you have basic understanding of Linux and SSH as well as basic load balancing and failover strategies.

Cross Data Center Load Balancing / Failover

One of the main uses cases for Zeus is to load balance servers in the same data center. However, a more interesting use case is to quickly and easily load balance web servers within one data center and support failover to another data center. The process is straight forward. First, deploy the Zeus partner image as a VM with 1G RAM in the US-West-1. This example assumes that you already have web servers running on both the US-West-1 and US-East-1 data centers.

Once the Zeus image has been deployed, SSH into the server using the root login. Your logins can be found in the GoGrid web portal by clicking on the server icon, then Tools > Passwords.

We recommend changing your automatically created, default password as soon as you login.

(more…) «How to Configure Zeus’ New Load Balancer in the GoGrid Cloud»

The Importance of Building Your Cloud Infrastructure the RIGHT Way

Thursday, July 21st, 2011 by

The cloud is great for so many things. You can create a web presence in a matter of hours or completely implement an N-tiered, redundant, elastic, secure globally-available cloud topology. Spinning up infrastructure via a web portal or API in minutes via a few clicks of a mouse is a dramatic transformation from the days of racking and stacking servers, untangling miles of cat5/6 cables, connecting load balancers and firewalls to the mix and hooking up storage devices. And let’s not forget about physical security, power supplies, cooling and network redundancy. The neat thing about the cloud is that all of the stuff has become really easy to do and you can do it very quickly.

GoGrid has a long history of enabling IT infrastructure solutions for companies across the world. We have built out core services and offerings to allow businesses to build want they want quickly, efficiently and with state-of-the-art cloud technology. But just because you have great tools at your disposal doesn’t mean that your cloud environment will magically create itself. And that is something that we realize and understand at GoGrid.

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Architect for Success

Cloud computing can be almost magical at times, but we need to remember the processes and best practices for security and ensuring redundancy that we are accustomed to using, and adapt and use them within the cloud as well.

A few weeks ago, I wrote a post “Things to Think About When Building Secure Infrastructure” where I made a few points about “assumption,” namely, assuming that whatever cloud vendor you choose, they will take care of everything for you. Regardless of the cloud vendor, you need to do your due diligence and update your standard operating procedures to reflect how cloud computing works. It is different than traditional IT in many ways. For example, in the GoGrid cloud, you can create a cloud server, harden it with security software and configurations and then save it as a MyGSI (as “server image”). Then, as you need to scale out your infrastructure, you can do this not only quickly, but securely as well, by deploying clones or instances of that hardened server. With a traditional, physical deployment, it takes much longer and there is no guarantee that you will have each and every security patch in place on every server.

(more…) «The Importance of Building Your Cloud Infrastructure the RIGHT Way»

Learn How a GoGrid Customer Created a Multiple Data Center Routing & Failover Infrastructure Environment

Tuesday, March 22nd, 2011 by

We absolutely LOVE hearing how GoGrid customers are using our cloud solutions to create unique “cloud fingerprints” and environments using the features and data centers of GoGrid. Paul Trippett just published a very interesting write-up of an infrastructure environment that addresses many of the common concerns facing any company looking to provide a highly-redundant infrastructure while also ensuring a solid Service Level Agreement (SLA) for their customers.

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You can find Paul’s original write-up titled “Utilizing GoGrid’s Multiple Data Centers for Routing and Failover” on his site. With his permission, we have reposted the article so that others can learn, mimic and build upon his unique scenario.

At the beginning of the year one of our customers asked us if we can provide an SLA for StormRETS and with it, the sound gritting teeth suddenly echoed around the room. As you can imagine, this caused more questions than which we actually had answers for:

blockquote_2 What kind of SLA did we want to provide and what could we realistically provide?

Our hosting provider, at the time, had an SLA which entailed “We don’t give any guarantee that your servers will be available, but if for any reason they are unavailable we will get the back up and running as soon as we can.”, erm, how on earth can we build a SLA based on that. It was decided at this time we would migrate our servers to another hosting provider, one at least with a SLA we can build on and a company we can actually contact directly should a problem arise.

(more…) «Learn How a GoGrid Customer Created a Multiple Data Center Routing & Failover Infrastructure Environment»