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Archive for the ‘Industry’ Category

 

James Gosling to Speak on Innovation at GoGrid Cloud Meetup on 5/22

Thursday, May 16th, 2013 by

GoGrid, BEAR Data Solutions, NetApp, and ScaleArc have an exciting cloud meetup planned for next week (Wednesday, May 22, 2013) in San Francisco. In addition to intelligent conversation, free food and drink, and demos from a variety of companies whose products make cloud computing even better, we also have a fantastic featured speaker – James Gosling. (Register for the GoGrid Cloud Meetup here.)

img-bio-headshot-james

Known affectionately as the “Father of Java,” one of the most popular and widely used programming languages in the world, James Gosling is currently the Chief Software Architect at Liquid Robotics (a GoGrid customer). He frequently shares his thoughts on creativity and innovation with everyone from university students to technology thought leaders, and is particularly interested in what makes a good idea successful. His impressive list of accomplishments and credentials include a BSc in computer science from the University of Calgary as well as a PhD in computer science from Carnegie-Mellon University. He was a Sun Fellow at Sun Microsystems where he was a lead engineer and did the original design of Java as well as implemented Java’s original compiler and virtual machine. In 2002, he was awarded The Economist Innovation Award, and in 2007, he was made an Officer of the Order of Canada, one of Canada’s highest civilian honors.

James’s company, Liquid Robotics, is an early adopter of cloud computing and its technology gathers all types of oceanic data via a wave-powered, autonomous marine robot, the Wave Glider®.

About the GoGrid Cloud Meetup

We hope you can join us and the other hosts at this meetup celebrating innovation in the cloud. The agenda is designed to let you to chat, mingle, and learn about a variety of cloud computing topics.

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Advertising in the Cloud

Thursday, May 2nd, 2013 by

If you’re an online advertising company, you know how important it is to have infrastructure that performs and is resilient, reliable, and available globally. You want to spend your time optimizing your ad delivery across the world, developing your delivery platform, and not on worrying about whether your infrastructure can deliver your content quickly and accurately.

We get advertising. We all click on an online ad or read the messaging or watch the videos. We have customers that are pushing the technology envelope to deliver their advertising to end users. And many of our advertising customers have complex cloud infrastructure powering their platforms.

Advertising in the Cloud - Ad Network architecture

From Big Data architectures to Content Delivery Networks (CDNs) to multi-data-center deployments, our solutions are carefully designed to meet the unique needs of advertising providers. And although you could do it all yourself in our global cloud, we view ourselves as your partner. Our Solutions Architects are available to help you identify the best services we provide for crafting your advertising delivery platform. Remember: You need to design your infrastructure to take advantage of the benefits of cloud computing, and we believe you shouldn’t go at it alone.

Download Gartner’s “The Future of the Mobile Cloud”  for free which discusses how mobile and cloud are experiencing explosive growth! [download]

Three Advertising Leaders

The network architecture charts above are actual representations of 3 of our advertising customers, specifically Brilig (Merkel), Excite Digital Media, and Martini Media. The case studies below discuss the unique challenges each of them faced and how we worked together to develop powerful cloud solutions.

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Is Your High-Tech Company Ready For An SDN-Enabled Cloud?

Thursday, April 18th, 2013 by

When it comes to technology, there are many companies on the “bleeding edge” these days. Sometimes these companies achieve greatness by being visionary, producing products or services that others haven’t thought of, or investing heavily in R&D. But they all have one thing in common: They use the latest high-tech, innovative solutions to power their journeys.

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When it comes to the underlying infrastructure powering a technology-oriented company, “cutting edge” means success. Sites and services need to perform, be reliable, be resilient, and have the flexibility to expand and contract based on the ebb and flow of day-to-day business. For me, that means cloud infrastructure is the best solution for companies looking to stay ahead of the curve.

Over the past few months, GoGrid has released a variety of services and features designed to give companies a leg up on the competition. It’s all centered on providing cloud infrastructure that’s flexible, yet forward-thinking. It’s much more than simply needing faster and bigger clouds—it’s about architecting our cloud solutions to provide customers with a highly available and distributed set of infrastructure components. And it’s architected according to software-defined networking (SDN) concepts.

SDN architecture isn’t focused on internetworked commodity hardware or new ways to provide networking services. It’s designed to distribute a variety of formerly hardware-based solutions across nodes, data centers, and clouds. When you think about “old school” infrastructure architecture, you probably think of physical devices. And if you think about one device, you really need to think about two, for redundancy and backup. If your hardware load balancer or firewall fails, you have to be sure you have a warm or hot standby available to immediately take its place. That requires time and money. And if you want to be cutting edge, you don’t want to be spending your precious time and money planning for the inevitable. You want to be innovating and iterating.

That’s where SDN is truly powerful and why many of the leading technology companies are adopting solutions that use it. With SDN, you can build in fault tolerance and redundancy. Take our recently released Dynamic Load Balancers as an example. Instead of relying on a single hardware device for routing traffic between available servers, our Dynamic Load Balancers are distributed and highly available across our Public Cloud. If one of the Dynamic Load Balancers fails, another instance, complete with configurations, is spawned immediately elsewhere thanks to our self-healing design. And these load-balancing services can be controlled programmatically via our API.

This month we announced another service that operates in the same distributed manner, our Firewall Service. Although many companies choose to use Cisco ASAs as a security front end for their cloud and physical infrastructure environments (an offering we also provide), these are physical devices that require management. However, our SDN architecture lets us provide more resilient and creative solutions. Like our Dynamic Load Balancers, our Firewall Service is built around SDN concepts and distributed across nodes and our data centers. When you create a security group (that has policies assigned to it), it’s automatically replicated across all our data centers within seconds. If you have distributed infrastructure, you can simply assign a security group to any similarly configured Cloud Server, regardless of that server’s location. If you subsequently change a policy, it’s automatically synchronized to all servers across all data centers that are part of that security group. In other words, you configure once, assign the security group to the server(s), and then watch the SDN magic happen.

(more…) «Is Your High-Tech Company Ready For An SDN-Enabled Cloud?»

Capitalizing on cloud cost-saving opportunities

Friday, April 12th, 2013 by

In most cases, cloud computing can replace traditional data center infrastructure solutions for less money, making them an affordable alternative for maintaining and potentially improving operations in today’s unpredictable economy. However, these financial benefits are only achieved when decision-makers take the time to plan the deployments carefully and understand the fundamentals of how their organizations carry out mission-critical tasks.

Capitalizing on cloud cost-saving opportunities

Capitalizing on cloud cost-saving opportunities

A recent InformationWeek report highlighted how many cloud implementations are underutilized, largely because executives impulsively migrate to the hosted environments without first identifying best practices for optimizing the services. This means that many of the cloud’s potential financial opportunities are discarded, making the technology less efficient than it can be.

Several technology evangelists told InformationWeek that cloud vendors love charging less than traditional service providers, as doing so gives them the opportunity to reach new customers and introduce significant improvements to internal operations. When executives over​-provision the hosted services, however, organizations are forced to pay for unused resources, diminishing some of the cost-saving opportunities. Fortunately, there are ways to circumvent these challenges.

Ensuring the cloud delivers financial benefits
Understanding and monitoring usage is among the best ways to ensure a cloud infrastructure is able to capitalize on all of the financial perks the technology is widely known for, InformationWeek stated. Decision-makers should not simply pick a random budget and assume each month is the same. Instead, IT directors should observe how the environments are used and whether certain months or time periods require individuals to consume more resources. If a company is using fewer tools than initially expected, executives need to understand why.

In addition to consolidating all cloud services through a single provider, which may qualify for some price breaks, organizations should think about how they can use the cloud to optimize servers, according to the news source. Many cloud vendors today offer automated scaling services, which enable firms to use more infrastructure tools when they are needed and deactivate those same assets when they are not necessary. This means many solutions will no longer be running 24-hours a day, allowing businesses to reduce maintenance expenses.

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Public Cloud Infrastructure Continues Gaining Momentum

Wednesday, March 6th, 2013 by

As the prospect of using cloud infrastructure technologies continues to influence decision-makers to adopt hosted services, companies are forced to choose which model they will implement: the private, public or hybrid network. In most cases, organizations are opting for the public cloud, because its multi-tenant environment and low buy-in opportunity lets firms of all sizes embrace the services.

A recent report by Gartner highlighted the progress of the public cloud, noting that it is forecast to generate roughly $131 billion in revenue in 2013, up 18.5 percent from the 2012 value of $111 billion. As executives gain more confidence in the cloud, they will leverage the solutions for a broader range of purposes, hoping to extend the value of the services to more departments and teams within the organization.

Public cloud infrastructure continues gaining momentum

Public cloud infrastructure continues gaining momentum

“The continued growth of the cloud services market will result from the adoption of cloud services for production systems and workloads, in addition to the development and testing scenarios that have led as the most prominent use case for public cloud services to date,” said Ed Anderson, research director at Gartner. “Evidence of this growth is found in the increasing demand for cloud services from end-user organizations, met by an increased supply of cloud services from suppliers.”

Some models garner more appreciation than others
Although the majority of the public cloud market is forecast to increase, certain segments of the industry will experience faster or more substantial growth than others. Because so many organizations are looking to augment storage, general computing and printing services, for example, the cloud infrastructure portion of the sector is forecast to develop quicker than other services.

Analysts said Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) grew 42.4 percent in 2012 to generate $6.1 billion in revenue and this rate will continue into this year, expanding 47.3 percent to $9 billion in revenue. This rapid evolution will make IaaS the fastest-growing cloud segment of the global market.

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