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Archive for the ‘Iaas’ Category

 

Connect from Anywhere to the Cloud

Thursday, August 29th, 2013 by

Bay Bridge in the dusk

The cloud is an important part of many companies’ IT strategies. However, there are many companies that have already made a large investment in infrastructure in their data centers. How can they take advantage of all the cloud has to offer without abandoning their investment? The answer is Cloud Bridge – private, dedicated access to the GoGrid cloud from anywhere.

Connecting to the Cloud

Cloud Bridge is your access point into the GoGrid cloud. It supports Layer 2 connections from cross-connects within a partner data center or with carrier connections from just about anywhere. Cloud Bridge is designed to be simple –  just select the port speed you prefer: 100 Mbps, 1 Gbps, or 10 Gbps (only in US-East-1). There’s also no long-term commitment required to use Cloud Bridge – pay only for what you use and cancel anytime. Traffic across Cloud Bridge is unmetered, so you only pay for access to the port. You also have the option of selecting a redundant setup: Purchase two ports in a redundant configuration and you’ll get an aggregate link. Not only will your traffic have physical redundancy, but you’ll also get all the speed available to both ports (for example, 2 Gbps of bandwidth with redundant 1-Gbps ports selected). You can access Cloud Bridge from equipment that you have in GoGrid’s Co-Location Service, a partner data center (like Equinix via a cross-connect), or from your data center using one of your carriers or with one of our partner resellers.

Why Cloud Bridge

Customers that want to use Cloud Bridge are typically looking to solve the following use cases: (more…) «Connect from Anywhere to the Cloud»

How to Build Highly Available Applications with Cloud Infrastructure

Tuesday, July 30th, 2013 by

Every technology company starts with a great idea. And in the early stages of application design, the decisions you make can have a long-term impact. These design decisions are critical and can make or break both the product and the company. At GoGrid, we’ve helped a lot of customers architect applications for the cloud and along the way we’ve learned a thing or two about the decisions you need to make. Here are 3 key questions to help you get started.

Uptime

1. Traditional data center or cloud infrastructure (IaaS)?

One of the first and most important decisions is whether to go with a traditional data center or architect in the cloud by leveraging an infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) provider. Although a traditional data center provides absolute control over hardware and the software, there’s a significant downside to maintaining the hardware. These costs can be significant, but if you move to the cloud, you can avoid them completely. The GoGrid, Amazon Web Services, and Microsoft clouds are all maintained by professionals, allowing you to focus on your application rather than the hardware. By going with an IaaS provider, you also gain application flexibility that lets you scale resources up and down as needed. And we can all agree that in most cases, scaling an application horizontally is preferable to scaling vertically. This option is especially important when your application reaches global proportions and you require specialized features like global load balancing to ensure minimal application latency or even support for regional application variations (think multiple languages for global applications).

2. Where does multi-tenancy reside?

In most cases, you’ll also need to make a decision about where multi-tenancy resides. If you were to architect in a traditional data center, you might take a shortcut and decide to put each customer on a separate machine. However, doing so would be a mistake for a few reasons. First, applications no longer run on a single box that’s scaled up, which means isolating users to individual machines no longer makes much sense. What’s worse, that approach would create a management nightmare by requiring you to monitor thousands of machines as your application scales users. Plus, this type of architecture locks you into a particular vendor or service provider, and you probably don’t want that. So where should multi-tenancy reside? The answer is easy: It should reside in the application layer above the virtual machine or server layer. By architecting multi-tenancy into the application layer, you’re free from lock-in and able to scale resources as needed, avoiding costly over-provisioning. You’ve also allowed customers to scale beyond the resource constraints of a single server. Equally important, this approach lets you architect failover scenarios that ensure high availability and consistency even if the underlying platform has an issue.

(more…) «How to Build Highly Available Applications with Cloud Infrastructure»

Building private cloud infrastructure

Friday, July 5th, 2013 by

Although the proliferation of public cloud computing technologies has encouraged a large portion of the business world to migrate resources to an off-site environment, many decision-makers believe managing their own assets can be more beneficial. For this reason, among others, enterprise executives often prefer to leverage a private cloud architecture that enables them to satisfy numerous goals that cannot be met while using only the public cloud.

Building a private cloud infrastructure

Building a private cloud infrastructure

Yet constructing a private cloud is not a simple one-and-done process. A recent InfoWorld report highlighted how constructing a private infrastructure is similar to building a data center, though it is distinct in several ways. For one, the management layer capabilities are different in a private cloud than they are in a premise-based virtualization architecture.

InfoWorld noted that private clouds, for the most part, will offer some level of self-service, which is important for organizations that need to manage various solutions throughout their life cycle. Unlike conventional data centers, however, these management capabilities must be available to business units, not just the IT department. This is because it is often too time-consuming to have business teams consult with IT every time servers must be commissioned or other processes need to happen.

By working with a trusted service provider, companies can be sure they implement private clouds with the appropriate management capabilities for the workforce as a whole.

Leveled security
In traditional IT environments, IT controls the majority of security controls, which makes administrative considerations unnecessary. Because the private cloud enables individuals to decommission, deploy and manage servers on their own, decision-makers need to ensure they have the ability to protect sensitive information and resources during these procedures, InfoWorld noted.

(more…) «Building private cloud infrastructure»

Cloud computing improves security for SMBs, studies reveal

Tuesday, June 18th, 2013 by

For the past several years, cloud computing has been disrupting the business world by providing organizations with innovative ways to save money, improve operations and gain access to next-generation applications. Small and medium-sized businesses (SMBs) have begun to recognize that the benefits of the cloud have reached their organizations as well. Still, some fears about the hosted services held many companies back. A recent study of US SMBs by Microsoft, however, revealed that many of these concerns are not backed by data but are really just misconceptions about the technology.

Cloud computing improves security, not impairs it

Cloud computing improves security, not impairs it

The survey found that 60 percent of organizations that have not yet adopted the cloud because of security concerns. Other SMBs that have not embraced the cloud said the fear of unreliability or loss of control over sensitive data held them back.

Conversely, businesses that have adopted the cloud have experienced benefits in all of these categories, suggesting the shroud of uncertainty surrounding the cloud should not be an obstacle.

“There’s a big gap between perception and reality when it comes to the cloud. SMBs that have adopted cloud services found security, privacy and reliability advantages to an extent they didn’t expect,” said Adrienne Hall of Microsoft. “The real silver lining in cloud computing is that it enables companies not only to invest more time and money into growing their business, but to better secure their data and to do so with greater degrees of service reliability as well.”

The truth about the cloud
The underlying reality of a cloud infrastructure is that it is often more secure and reliable than traditional premise-based systems. Microsoft highlighted this truth when it found that a whopping 94 percent of SMBs using the cloud revealed that they acquired more security benefits using the hosted services than they did with legacy solutions. This meant having access to more innovative and up-to-date antivirus and data management tools.

(more…) «Cloud computing improves security for SMBs, studies reveal»

Get Your Game On in the Cloud

Tuesday, June 11th, 2013 by

Do you play mobile games on your smartphone or tablet? What about on your computer? And do you still put in a CD or DVD to play them? Or do you download an app to play? Have you ever tried an online game within Facebook? And what about on your game console? As bandwidth has increased and technology has evolved, more and more of these gaming experiences are being served from the cloud. Online gaming has transcended physical media like CDs, DVDs, and installed applications and moved to virtual environments based on Flash, HTML5, or other streamed or in-browser technologies.

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According to investment bank Digi-Capital, mobile games account for 42 percent of all new game investments. If money trails are any indication of success, we should watch to see where the banks are investing. In December 2012, Forbes reported that US video game sales dropped 25 percent in the month of October 2012, falling from $1 billion to $775.5 million. Conversely, general spending on mobile and social games rose 7 percent to $7.24 billion in 2011…and that was a few years ago!

Just take a look at some of the games listed in this .NET article, “The top 10 HTML5 games of 2012.” It’s very impressive that the underlying technology is completely browser-based and that these games are absolutely interactive and full-featured. Just for fun, I decided to see how many of these HTML5 games are cloud-hosted. (Remember though, because HTML5 is in-browser code, it doesn’t matter that much if it is cloud or traditionally hosted.) Here’s what I discovered:

  • “A Grain of Truth” – shared hosting
  • “Dune 2 Online” – colocation
  • “Cut the Rope” – cloud/dedicated/custom hosting
  • “Hex GL” – shared/dedicated hosting
  • “Lux Ahoy” – cloud/dedicated hosting
  • “D.E.M.O.” – cloud hosting
  • “BananaBread” – telco hosting
  • “Save the Day” – cloud hosting
  • “Bombermine” – shared hosting
  • “BrowserQuest” – ISP/VPS/Web hosting

As you can see, there’s quite a mixture of hosting provider types, ranging from shared to large-scale ISP/telco to cloud. The physical requirements for these types of HTML5 games rely mainly on the end user and the capabilities of the specific device. However, if any of these HTML5 games were to take off in popularity, the game owner would need to scale its infrastructure to handle the increased demand.

(more…) «Get Your Game On in the Cloud»