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Archive for the ‘Iaas’ Category

 

High RAM Cloud Servers for Distributed Caching

Tuesday, June 10th, 2014 by

GoGrid has just released High RAM Cloud Servers on our high-performance fabric. These servers are designed to provide a high amount of available RAM that is most commonly required for caching servers. Like our other recent product releases, these servers are all built on our redundant 10-Gbps public and private network.

High RAM Cloud Servers are available in the following configurations:

High RAM RAM Cores SSD Storage
X-Large 16 GB 4 40 GB
2X-Large 32 GB 8 40 GB
4X-Large 64 GB 16 40 GB
8X-Large 128 GB 28 40 GB
16X-Large 256 GB 40 40 GB

 

 

 

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HBase Made Simple

Wednesday, April 30th, 2014 by

GoGrid has just released its 1-Button Deploy™ of HBase, available to all customers in the US-West-1 data center. This technology makes it easy to deploy either a development or production HBase cluster on GoGrid’s high-performance infrastructure. GoGrid’s 1-Button Deploy™ technology combines the capabilities of one of the leading NoSQL databases with our expertise in building high-performance Cloud Servers.

HBase is a scalable, high-performance, open-source database. HBase is often called the Hadoop distributed database – it leverages the Hadoop framework but adds several capabilities such as real-time queries and the ability to organize data into a table-like structure. GoGrid’s 1-Button Deploy™ of HBase takes advantage of our SSD and Raw Disk Cloud Servers while making it easy to deploy a fully configured cluster. GoGrid deploys the latest Hortonworks’ distribution of HBase on Hadoop 2.0. If you’ve ever tried to deploy HBase or Hadoop yourself, you know it can be challenging. GoGrid’s 1-button Deploy™ does all the heavy lifting and applies all the recommended configurations to ensure a smooth path to deployment.

Why GoGrid Cloud Servers?

SSD Cloud Servers have several high-performance characteristics. They all come with attached SSD storage and large available RAM for the high I/O uses common to HBase. The Name Nodes benefit from the large RAM options available on SSD Cloud Servers and the Data Nodes use our Raw Disk Cloud Servers, which are configured as JBOD (Just a Bunch of Disks). This is the recommended disk configuration for Data Nodes, and GoGrid is one of the first providers to offer this configuration in a Cloud Server. Both SSD and Raw Disk Cloud Servers use a redundant 10-Gbps public and private network to ensure you have the maximum bandwidth to transfer your data. Plus, the cloud makes it easy to add more Data Nodes to your cluster as needed. You can use GoGrid’s 1-Button Deploy™ to provision either a 5-server development cluster or an 11-server production cluster with Firewall Service enabled.

Development Environments

The smallest recommended size for a development cluster is 5 servers. Although it’s possible to run HBase on a single server, you won’t be able to test failover or how data is replicated across nodes. You’ll most likely have a small database so you won’t need as much RAM, but will still benefit from SSD storage and a fast network. The Data Nodes use Raw Disk Cloud Servers and are configured with a replication factor of 3.

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Comparing Cloud Infrastructure Options for Running NoSQL Workloads

Friday, April 11th, 2014 by

A walk through in-memory, general compute, and mass storage options for Cassandra, MongoDB, Riak, and HBase workloads

I recently had the pleasure of attending Cassandra Tech Day in San Jose, a developer-focused event where people were learning about various options for deploying Cassandra clusters. As it turns out, there was a lot of buzz surrounding the new in-memory option for Cassandra and the use cases for it. This interest got me thinking about how to map the options customers have for running Big Data across clouds.

For a specific workload, NoSQL customers may want to have the following:

1. Access to mass storage servers for files and objects (not to be confused with block storage). Instead, we’re talking on-demand access to terabytes of raw spinning disk volumes for running a large storage array (think storage hub for Hadoop/HBase, Cassandra, or MongoDB).

2. Access to High RAM options for running in-memory with the fastest possible response times—the same times you’d need when running the in-memory version of Cassandra or even running Riak or Redis in-memory.

3. Access to high-performance SSDs to run balanced workloads. Think about what happens after you run a batch operation. If you’re relating information back to a product schema, you may want to push that data into something like PostgrSQL, SQL, or even MySQL and have access to block storage.

4. Access to general-purpose instances for dev and test or for workloads that don’t have specific performance SLAs. This ability is particularly important when you’re trialing and evaluating a variety of applications. GoGrid’s customer’s, for example, leverage our 1-Button Deploy™ technology to quickly spin up dev clusters of common NoSQL solutions from MongoDB to Cassandra, Riak, and HBase.

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Be Prepared with a Solid Cloud Infrastructure

Thursday, April 10th, 2014 by

The more Big Data enterprises continue to amass, the more potential risk is involved. It would be one matter if it was simply raw material without any clearly defined meaning; however data analytics tools—combined with the professionalism of tech-savvy employees—allow businesses to harvest profit-driving, actionable digital information.

Recovery disks shattering

Compared to on-premise data centers, cloud computing offers multiple disaster recovery models.

Whether the risk is from a a cyber-criminal who gains access to a database or a storm that cuts power, it’s essential for enterprises to have a solid disaster recovery plan in place. Because on-premise data centers are prone to outages in the event of a catastrophic natural event, cloud servers provide a more stable option for companies requiring constant access to their data. Numerous deployment models exist for these systems, and most of them are constructed based on how users interact with them.

How the cloud can promote disaster recovery 
According to a report conducted by InformationWeek, only 41 percent of respondents to the magazine’s 2014 State of Enterprise Storage Survey stated they have a disaster recovery (DR) and business continuity protocol and regularly test it. Although this finding expresses a lack of preparedness by the remaining 59 percent, the study showed that business leaders were beginning to see the big picture and placing their confidence in cloud applications.

The source noted that cloud infrastructure and Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) automation software let organizations  deploy optimal DR without the hassle associated with a conventional plan. Traditionally, companies backed up their data on physical disks and shipped them to storage facilities. This method is no longer workable because many enterprises are constantly amassing and refining new data points. For example, Netflix collects an incredible amount of specific digital information on its subscribers through its rating system and then uses it to recommend new viewing options.

The news source also acknowledged that the issue isn’t just about recovering data lost during the outage, but about being able to run the programs that process and interact with that information. In fact, due to the complexity of these infrastructures, many cloud hosts offer DR-as-a-Service.

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Moving Apps to the Cloud Results in New Agility

Wednesday, October 16th, 2013 by

As the need for flexible, agile, and efficient infrastructure tops business priorities, company executives are looking to the cloud for solutions. In the past, the majority of IT architecture and mission-critical applications were maintained within in-house data centers. That isn’t the situation that exists today, however, because roughly 69 percent of organizations are planning to migrate crucial systems to the cloud by the end of 2014.

Moving apps to the cloud results in new agility

Moving apps to the cloud results in new agility

This was among the key findings in a new Virtustream survey, which also revealed that senior-level decision-makers are accepting this new cloud trend. In fact, the majority of executives now understand that implementing the cloud and migrating crucial infrastructure resources to the hosted environment delivers numerous benefits, and more than half of respondents said the cloud enables them to strengthen business agility.

Although speed and functionality were cited as the most common advantages that come with the use of cloud environments, 42 percent of decision-makers also said the solutions give them a competitive advantage, while another 40 percent stated that the technology allows employees to be more productive.

“The end of 2014 will be a pivotal moment for the enterprise cloud,” Virtustream executive Simon Aspinall said. “ERP and other mission-critical applications have mainly been deployed conventionally–the cuckoos in cloud land. The next 18 months will see these critical applications pushed out of their in-house data center nests and migrated to the cloud.”

Although some still harbor a few lingering doubts about migrating to the cloud, most decision-makers are taking these concerns with a grain of salt and taking the plunge anyway. In fact, nearly 90 percent of decision-makers said they were aware of why they should migrate applications to the cloud.

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