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Archive for the ‘How To’ Category

 

Leverage Automation for your Private Network

Tuesday, January 29th, 2013 by

GoGrid has recently released some new features that improve on the customer experience using our private network.  Private Network Automation (PNA) is currently available in all our data centers. As of this most recent release, these new features will be exposed if you enable PNA by contacting support:

  • All servers will have a private IP assigned upon creation (both virtual and dedicated)
  • Any private IPs that are used will be marked as assigned on the portal
  • Cloud Storage no longer requires static routes. It is now accessible via your favorite protocol (Samba, SCP, etc.)

The assignment of private IPs happen automatically at the time a new server is deployed. GoGrid has enabled this for all new customers. If you are an existing customer, this is feature IS NOT enabled in data centers where you have servers deployed. You will need to file a support ticket to request this feature. Note that once enabled, this will be active for all new servers only – existing servers will keep their existing settings.

As you can see from the screenshot below, once you create the server, you will have a public IP and a private IP assigned. Note that this feature is enabled for both virtual and dedicated servers.

AMS_private_IP

This is also visible in the Networking tab so that you can monitor private IPs that have been assigned from your block.

PNA_List

(more…) «Leverage Automation for your Private Network»

How to Recover from a Linux Security Breach – Recovery & Hardening (Part 2)

Tuesday, January 29th, 2013 by

This is Part 2 of a GoGrid security blog series on identifying and recovering from a Linux security breach. Part 1 provided general guidelines for conducting a security analysis on a compromised Linux server and forming strategic teams to address and resolve the breach.

In this article, we’ll review some recommended steps for recovering from a breach.

Recovering from the Breach

Lock the doors

Now that you’ve confirmed that there are no intruders logged in and you’ve identified the established connections, it’s time to “lock the doors.” Locking the doors largely depends on who is managing your firewall. Contact GoGrid in the event that we’re managing your firewall or perform the following actions if you manage your firewall:

  • Modify your system’s iptables configuration to restrict all remote console connections such as SSH to your office network
  • Modify your system’s iptables configuration to block all previously identified suspicious connections from and to your system.
  • Modify your system’s iptables to block all other services from the public Internet to your server. Doing so will effectively bring down your website or services, but you want to avoid compromising your customers or web site visitors.

Install and run a rootkit analyzer

(more…) «How to Recover from a Linux Security Breach – Recovery & Hardening (Part 2)»

How to Recover from a Linux Security Breach – Forensics, Analysis, & Building Teams (Part 1)

Monday, January 28th, 2013 by

This 2-part GoGrid security blog series provides general guidelines for conducting a security analysis on a compromised Linux server and for recovering from a breach. Before you begin the security analysis, you need to consider two important factors:

1. The type of data your compromised server is storing or transmitting,
2. How important the server’s function is to your business

The data type—Personally Identifiable Information (PII) or Protected Health Information (PHI), for example—is important because your organization could be legally required to notify external parties and local or federal government agencies in the event of a breach. The compromised server’s function is important because its criticality may drive the recovery timeline.

You also may want to consider engaging a third-party that specializes in security forensics.

This series will cover 3 important items:

1) Understanding & assessing the breach
2) Setting up forensics & recovery teams
3) Recovering from the breach

Although this series won’t replace what a competent security firm can accomplish, it does provide an overview of some core processes, procedures, and activities you can do to potentially recover from a breach. And because each incident varies based on your computer system, be sure to conduct additional analysis and consult with experts to double-check your breach identification and resolution plan. (more…) «How to Recover from a Linux Security Breach – Forensics, Analysis, & Building Teams (Part 1)»

How to Select, Configure, & Deploy a GoGrid Cloud Server in Minutes

Thursday, January 10th, 2013 by

If you visit the GoGrid homepage, you’ll be greeted with the following headline:

We make cloud infrastructure easy. Really easy.

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But without trying our cloud infrastructure service, how can you really know what “easy” means? It can be completely subjective and open to interpretation. Even so, we stand firmly by our statement. It IS easy because it simply boils down to 3 action words:

1. select
2. configure
3. deploy.

Don’t just take my word for it though. Your best bet is to test it out yourself. (Here’s a hint: If you’re new to GoGrid, contact one of our Cloud Experts, mention this blog post, and get a $100 service credit to see if we’re right.)

Almost as easy as watching a video

I understand you may not have time to do some hands-on testing so we’ve put together a short (3 minute 40 second) video that walks you through how to: (more…) «How to Select, Configure, & Deploy a GoGrid Cloud Server in Minutes»

Security Basics: 4 Steps to Tighten up Linux Security

Tuesday, November 20th, 2012 by

Our previous security articles from GoGrid discussed 5 steps to enhance your security on Microsoft Windows and how to tighten up Windows security. But what about making your Linux server security a bit more robust?

security-camera

Overview

Security studies strongly demonstrate that most systems will be attacked within 5 hours after becoming publicly accessible—in some cases, in less than 2 hours. The sources of the attacks are often unsuspecting users whose systems have been compromised by malware and are in turn being used to attack and infect other systems. The majority of attacks target two common threats:

  1. A combination of commonly used system accounts (e.g., the root account) with weak, dictionary-based passwords
  2. Systems that are missing critical or high-security vulnerabilities

Solution

This article provides GoGrid’s security recommendations for Cloud Servers running Linux. Perform these 4 steps in sequential order immediately after provisioning new GoGrid Cloud Servers to maintain the security (confidentiality + integrity + availability) of your system. (more…) «Security Basics: 4 Steps to Tighten up Linux Security»