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Archive for the ‘Guest’ Category

 

Cloud Migration: Whatever You Do, Have a Plan

Tuesday, May 7th, 2013 by

Every company adopting public cloud computing as part of its IT service delivery strategy is faced with the decision of which applications to migrate to the cloud and how. Some common cloud migration options we discuss with customers include:

  • Migrating to a Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) provider
  • Rebuilding an existing application in the cloud
  • Migrating an existing application “as is” to the cloud

Determining the right option depends on your business objectives and the application itself. Each option has benefits and drawbacks, but a business will often decide on an approach without adequately researching a comprehensive migration strategy. And without ample planning and consideration, the cost and complexity of migrating these applications can lead to delayed cloud projects that are over budget.

Cloud Migration - have a plan

Migrating to SaaS

For a new business looking for application services at a low up-front cost, a SaaS application is often a “no brainer.” However, when a business decides to migrate from an existing on-premise application to a new SaaS application, things get more complicated. There are data migrations to consider, transition time and labor, lost customizations, training, and “sunk costs” that can’t be recovered to factor in. Many SaaS vendors offer tools and services to help customers migrate data from legacy applications to the new SaaS application, but it’s important to research the migration process thoroughly before making a purchasing decision, especially if you’ve invested a lot of time in customizations or IT service integration.

Depending on the application and the availability of migration tools to assist in the migration, these factors can offset some of the gains of SaaS. Plus, the business risks additional time and expense if unforeseen migration challenges arise along the way. Businesses considering moving to SaaS should also consider what I call “SaaS in a box” or “SaaS-lite” applications. These applications are typically offered by vendors as part of a partner program or ecosystem like the GoGrid Exchange and deliver some SaaS benefits with more customer control. These templates can also be used to simplify the migration of an existing on-premise application to the cloud. (more…) «Cloud Migration: Whatever You Do, Have a Plan»

Security and Adaptability: Unlocking the Full Potential of Big Data and the Cloud

Tuesday, December 18th, 2012 by

Enthusiasm for and investment in Big Data and the Cloud is spurring innovation in a suite of new technologies that seek to transform information into knowledge at reduced costs. But the potential of Big Data and the Cloud is threatened by security, privacy, legal and regulatory constraints which prevent data integration and information sharing.

While the costs to capture, store and exploit data are declining, the costs of mishandling data are rising for every enterprise; and threaten to extend the data-poor environments in which we have long operated, forcing continued inferences and limits on data insights.

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Technology leaders like Google,Facebook and Target have reshaped their industries using Big Data, but each is facing increased scrutiny over data handling. The result has created an atmosphere of concern and trepidation and has deterred many in the Fortune 1000 from embracing Big Data.

The relationship between Big Data security and Big Data innovation is not zero-sum, but rather they are mutually reinforcing concepts. Traditional data security approaches, which have proven inadequate, deal with disequilibrium by seeking counterbalance. In this case more security, more privacy, and more constraints lead to limited data access, continued fragmentation of data sets, and missed opportunities.

Instead of addressing these challenges as an afterthought or applying solutions around the edges, solutions that bake in and address security, privacy, legal and regulatory constraints from the onset enable new insights, while simultaneously building trust and transparency. Such a data-centric security model promotes adaptability and re-conceptualizes the relationship among data, users and applications and reduces administrative burdens and risks. Simultaneously it unlocks the potential for innovation and serves as a mechanism for supporting the integration of disparate data sets and for more complete information sharing.

(more…) «Security and Adaptability: Unlocking the Full Potential of Big Data and the Cloud»

hack/reduce – Boston’s location for Big Data Innovation

Friday, November 9th, 2012 by

November 8, 2012 marks an important milestone in the Big Data revolution. With the opening of hack/reduce, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit created to cultivate a community of Big Data experts in Boston, technologists now have a state-of-the-art facility to develop ideas and incubate the next generation of technology innovation. When Fred Lalonde (CEO and founder of Hopper) and I co-founded hack/reduce, our goal was to help young technologists experiment with Big Data, share ideas, and cultivate a community of thought leaders without the burden of raising capital.

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We have raised more than $1 million from local venture capital firms and leading global technology providers to aid in the creation of the facility; additionally, we’ve been able to establish partnerships with MIT CSAIL and Harvard, which we believe will turn the tide on where entrepreneurs look to establish roots and nurture their ideas from inception to company formation. hack/reduce also looks to create the next wave of disruptive Big Data companies; consider that Boston has produced some of the hottest Big Data startups. including DataXu, Hadapt, Recorded Future, and Sqrrl. These companies continue to lead in their respective markets and draw Big Data talent from all over the globe to the Boston area.

Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick has been incredibly supportive, not only announcing the Massachusetts Big Data Initiative, but also providing a $50,000 grant for the support of hack/reduce. If you haven’t been to the website (http://www.hackreduce.org) or followed all of our recent activities on Twitter (http://twitter.com/hackreduce), I’d strongly encourage you to do so. There are workshops taking place, the chance to access a 1,000-node cluster, and networking opportunities with others interested in exploring the data tsunami.

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One of the things I’ve been most excited about since starting down this path with Fred has been the overwhelming response we’ve gotten from the local community. The event celebrating the opening of the space is no exception. We’ve received thousands of requests, but only had room for a few hundred. Not to worry: For those of you who weren’t able to attend, November 8 is just the beginning. We’ll continue to update you on our progress and keep you informed of events to come. I look forward to collaborating with all of the entrepreneurs at hack/reduce, each of whom is helping to drive the resurgence of technology leadership in Boston.

(more…) «hack/reduce – Boston’s location for Big Data Innovation»