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Archive for the ‘Features’ Category

 

Windows Server 2012 Now Available in the GoGrid Cloud

Tuesday, January 8th, 2013 by

When we launched our Cloud Infrastructure back in April 2008, one of our core requirements was to not only provide Linux distributions, but also Windows Servers in the cloud. We offered Windows Server 2003 immediately and a few months later added Windows Server 2008 to the mix.

Last month, we added Windows Server 2012 64-bit to round out our robust Windows Server line in the GoGrid cloud.

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We continue to provide Windows Servers in the cloud license-free meaning that you do not pay an additional surcharge on top of your cloud infrastructure costs. The only exceptions to this are for Windows Servers that have Microsoft SQL Server included.

It’s important to note that there is no longer an 8-core limitation on cloud servers. We now provide the same core allocations as we do with our Linux cloud servers, specifically:

  • XX-Large Cloud Servers with 16 GB RAM now come with 16-cores
  • XXX-Large Cloud Servers with 24 GB RAM now come with 24-cores

The number of cores is directly tied to the size of the server: (more…) «Windows Server 2012 Now Available in the GoGrid Cloud»

The 12 Days of Cloudiness

Thursday, December 13th, 2012 by

Happy Holidays to all of our friends, family and followers!

On the 1st day of Cloudiness, GoGrid gave to me,
Cloud infrastructure made easy.

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On the 2nd day of Cloudiness, GoGrid gave to me,
Public and private VLANs,
and cloud infrastructure made easy.

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On the 3rd day of Cloudiness, GoGrid gave to me,
Infinite cloud storage,
Public and private VLANs,
and cloud infrastructure made easy.

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On the 4th day of Cloudiness, GoGrid gave to me,
Secure hardware firewalls,
Infinite cloud storage,
Public and private VLANs,
and cloud infrastructure made easy.

(more…) «The 12 Days of Cloudiness»

You Don’t Need a Superstorm: Disaster Recovery Basics

Monday, November 12th, 2012 by

In this blog post, I’m going to discuss disaster recovery. After superstorm Sandy on the East Coast, there were people without power weeks after the storm. Data centers were affected by the storm as well. And although GoGrid’s East Coast data center didn’t experience an outage, some providers did. So it is timely to consider geographically redundant solutions rather than wait for the next superstorm.

Geographic Redundancy

There are three basic strategies you can implement today on GoGrid to make your application better able to recover from a data center outage: cold standby, warm standby, and full geographic-redundancy with multiple active data centers. Let’s start off with a definition:

Redundancy: (noun) the ability of an application or system to resist the failure of one or more constituent parts, or recover quickly from such failure.

Systems administration and IT management boils down to that proverbial 3:00am phone call. Your application is down. How do you respond? Having the proper plan and appropriate recovery assets in place is the key to surviving this all-too-real scenario. How current are your backups? Do you have standby servers already in place? If not, how quickly can you bring new ones online?

It’s pretty standard to have offsite backups. If the offsite backups are in a secondary data center, they can be used to springboard reconstituting your application. GoGrid offers two products that make this process easy to implement: (more…) «You Don’t Need a Superstorm: Disaster Recovery Basics»

InformationWeek’s “IaaS Buyer’s Guide” with some Updated Information from GoGrid

Friday, October 19th, 2012 by

This week, InformationWeek published an extremely handy IaaS Buyer’s Guide designed to help companies navigate the complex airspace of cloud computing, specifically the Infrastructure-as-a-Service marketplace. The Guide covers 9 IaaS providers, including GoGrid, that each submitted responses to a questionnaire about their service offerings. InformationWeek then compiled and categorized those responses in this easy-to-understand Guide. You can find the full Guide (behind a registration wall) here.

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Topics covered in the Guide include:

  • CPU & Memory
  • Storage
  • Operating Systems
  • Database Software Needs
  • Redundancy/Data Center Needs
  • Additional VM Features
  • Cost
  • Security & Compliance
  • Support & SLA
  • Additional Services

A few things have changed since GoGrid was originally interviewed, and we wanted to provide updated information for some of these categories.

CPU & Memory

(more…) «InformationWeek’s “IaaS Buyer’s Guide” with some Updated Information from GoGrid»

How To Optimize Cloud Server Workloads to Maximize Efficiency

Monday, September 24th, 2012 by

If you’re familiar with cloud infrastructure and infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS), you probably understand the substantial benefits that come along with deploying infrastructure in the public cloud: things like “utility billing and on-demand availability,” “elastic benefits that let you scale resources up and down based on demand,” and “the ability to rapidly move and redeploy workloads as needed.” This flexibility is why we originally brought GoGrid’s hourly pay-as-you-go Cloud Servers to market. They’re perfect for specific cases like these:

  • Periodic workloads that only run for a few hours, days, or weeks during a given billing cycle
  • Short-term, project-based workloads where term commitments aren’t desirable
  • Short-term spikes in workload where demand is erratic and being able to scale resources up and down quickly are desirable
  • Development and test workloads that require rapid iteration and redeployment of resources
  • Proof of concept workloads where instant access to resources and the ability to quickly change technology are key

Customers with steady-state and long-term workloads don’t always need this hourly flexibility, however. And that’s why GoGrid has developed prepaid monthly, semiannual, and annual Cloud Server products. Prepaid Cloud Servers are less flexible, but they do offer significant cost savings in exchange for the term commitment. The shortest prepaid term GoGrid offers is a monthly prepaid Cloud Server and the longest term is an annual prepaid Cloud Server.

If you run a constant workload during a given month, a prepaid term server is probably a better solution than an hourly server. Again, the tradeoff here is flexibility. Prepaid servers are ideal for:

  • Steady-state workloads where demand is constant
  • Workloads that tend to grow rather than contract
  • Production applications where you can plan for demand in advance

For example, imagine you run an eCommerce website. You know you always need three servers to run your operations throughout the year. During the holiday season, however, you know demand is likely to spike. Your deployment of annual servers going into the holiday would look something like this:

(more…) «How To Optimize Cloud Server Workloads to Maximize Efficiency»