Archive for the ‘Features’ Category

 

Big Data Cloud Servers for Hadoop

Monday, January 13th, 2014 by

GoGrid just launched Raw Disk Cloud Servers, the perfect choice for your Hadoop data node. These purpose-built Cloud Servers run on a redundant 10-Gbps network fabric on the latest Intel Ivy Bridge processors. What sets these servers apart, however, is the massive amount of raw storage in JBOD (Just  a Bunch of Disks) configuration. You can deploy up to 45 x 4 TB SAS disks on 1 Cloud Server.

These servers are designed to serve as Hadoop data nodes, which are typically deployed in a JBOD configuration. This setup maximizes available storage space on the server and also aids in performance. There are roughly 2 cores allocated per spindle, giving these servers additional MapReduce processing power. In addition, these disks aren’t a virtual allocation from a larger device. Each volume is actually a dedicated, physical 4 TB hard drive, so you get the full drive per volume with no initial write penalty.

Hadoop in the cloud

Most Hadoop distributions call for a name node supporting several data nodes. GoGrid offers a variety of SSD Cloud Servers that would be perfect for the Hadoop name node. Because they are also on the same 10-Gbps high-performance fabric as the Raw Disk Cloud Servers, SSD servers provide low latency private connectivity to your data nodes. I recommend using at least the X-Large SSD Cloud Server (16 GB RAM), although you may need a larger server, depending on the size of your Hadoop cluster. Because Hadoop stores metadata in memory, you’ll want more RAM if you have a lot of files to process. You can use any size Raw Disk Cloud Server, but you’ll want to deploy at least 3. Also, each Raw Disk Cloud Server has a different allocation of raw disks, which are illustrated in the table below. The Cloud Server in the illustration is the smallest size that has multiple disks per Cloud Server. Hadoop defaults to a replication factor of three, so to protect your data from failure, you’ll want to have at least 3 data nodes to distribute data. Although Hadoop attempts to replica data to different racks, there’s no guarantee that your Cloud Servers will be on different racks.

Note that the example below is for illustrative purposes only and is not representative of a typical Hadoop cluster; for example, most Cloudera and Hortonworks sizing guides start at 8 nodes. These configurations can differ greatly depending on if you intend to use the cluster for development, production, or production with HBase added. This includes the RAM and disk sizes (less of both for development, most likely more for HBase). Plus, if you’re thinking of using these nodes for production, you should consider adding a second name node.

Hadoop-cluster (more…) «Big Data Cloud Servers for Hadoop»

Connect from Anywhere to the Cloud

Thursday, August 29th, 2013 by

Bay Bridge in the dusk

The cloud is an important part of many companies’ IT strategies. However, there are many companies that have already made a large investment in infrastructure in their data centers. How can they take advantage of all the cloud has to offer without abandoning their investment? The answer is Cloud Bridge – private, dedicated access to the GoGrid cloud from anywhere.

Connecting to the Cloud

Cloud Bridge is your access point into the GoGrid cloud. It supports Layer 2 connections from cross-connects within a partner data center or with carrier connections from just about anywhere. Cloud Bridge is designed to be simple –  just select the port speed you prefer: 100 Mbps, 1 Gbps, or 10 Gbps (only in US-East-1). There’s also no long-term commitment required to use Cloud Bridge – pay only for what you use and cancel anytime. Traffic across Cloud Bridge is unmetered, so you only pay for access to the port. You also have the option of selecting a redundant setup: Purchase two ports in a redundant configuration and you’ll get an aggregate link. Not only will your traffic have physical redundancy, but you’ll also get all the speed available to both ports (for example, 2 Gbps of bandwidth with redundant 1-Gbps ports selected). You can access Cloud Bridge from equipment that you have in GoGrid’s Co-Location Service, a partner data center (like Equinix via a cross-connect), or from your data center using one of your carriers or with one of our partner resellers.

Why Cloud Bridge

Customers that want to use Cloud Bridge are typically looking to solve the following use cases: (more…) «Connect from Anywhere to the Cloud»

Geographic Load Balancing and Disaster Recovery Best Practices for Global Websites

Wednesday, August 21st, 2013 by

Technological World

If you’re running a global website, you’ll want to reduce the latency for customers around the world. GoGrid offers the global infrastructure and robust network to support this setup. With Geographic Load Balancing, GoGrid can also improve performance to your website from around the world. Here are recommended best practices for building a reliable, high-performing global website.

Deploying the Correct Infrastructure Setup

Global websites still require local infrastructure to be truly effective in reducing latency. GoGrid has data centers around the world where you can deploy infrastructure to better serve your customers. Deploy infrastructure to the Western United States (in our US-West-1 data center), Eastern United States (in US-East-1) and Europe (EU-West-1). Although your specific configuration is unique to your setup, you’ll most likely have database and webservers in each of these data centers.

In addition, you’ll want to keep your servers in-sync. One option between US-West-1 and US-East-1 is to use Cloud Link, a dedicated, private line between our data centers. This connectivity makes synching your servers secure and easy. Once you have your back end in place, you’ll want to configure your front end.

Geographic Load Balancing

(more…) «Geographic Load Balancing and Disaster Recovery Best Practices for Global Websites»

Access your servers with GoGrid’s new Console service

Thursday, May 23rd, 2013 by

At GoGrid we are always looking for ways to improve our product and add value for our customers. We have recently released some new services built on our new Software-Defined Networking (SDN) architecture that customers are already adopting: the Dynamic Load Balancer and Firewall Service. We have recently released a Console access feature on our management console for all our customers.

VNC-Lines

The new console service allows customers to directly access their cloud servers through the management console without using a third party client. Customers have been asking for this feature as it allows for emergency access in the case where they have locked themselves out with a bad host firewall configuration or if they need to do further diagnostics. Accessing the service is easy.

  1. First, login to the GoGrid management console.
  2. (more…) «Access your servers with GoGrid’s new Console service»

How To Enable & Manage the New, Free GoGrid Firewall Service

Wednesday, May 1st, 2013 by

Security and infrastructure don’t always go hand in hand. In fact, many non-adopters of cloud computing have cited the lack of good security as one of the primary reasons they are not wholeheartedly embracing the cloud and all its glory. In some ways, these naysayers are correct: You shouldn’t deploy a cloud or frankly any type of infrastructure without some type of security, whether it’s software-based controls or a hardware device. At GoGrid, it is this desire to overcome security concerns that compelled us to release our free (that’s right FREE) Firewall Service.

When we developed our Firewall Service, we wanted to do more than simply offer a set of blocking rules or a hardware device. We wanted our solution to be centrally managed, easy to use and configure, fully featured, integrated across all our data centers, reliable, programmatically controlled, highly available, flexible, elastic, self-healing…whew! And did I mention, free? As we did for our new Dynamic Load Balancers, we embraced the concepts of software-defined networking (SDN) when architecting our Firewall Service.

Our research showed that for small environments, software-based firewalls (like IPtables or a Windows Firewall) worked just fine, provided the infrastructure didn’t need to scale. Similarly, hardware-based firewalls were great for enterprise-grade installations (but remember, if you get one hardware device, you typically need another one ready as a failover). We wanted to do it better. You can read more about the theory behind our cloud Firewall Service in this article.

As with my previous How To articles, there are 3 easy steps in the Firewall Service setup:

1. Create a Security Group
2. Define
a Policy
3. Add
a Connection

GoGrid’s Firewall Service is distributed and global. That means that once it’s configured, it automatically synchronizes across all our data centers. If you have multiple web servers in multiple GoGrid data centers, you simply define the Security Groups and Policies, connect the servers, and you’re done. Any future policy changes are automatically synchronized to the connected servers. Simple, right? Let’s see how to set up the Firewall Service. (more…) «How To Enable & Manage the New, Free GoGrid Firewall Service»