Archive for the ‘FAQs’ Category

 

Enhancements to the GoGrid Management Console

Thursday, August 23rd, 2012 by

Our GoGrid cloud services engineers are always working away making visible and behind-the-scenes improvements to the customer experience on GoGrid. Today, we rolled out some enhancements to the customer management console that we wanted to highlight. Although several of these changes won’t be immediately apparent to all customers, we’ve done a lot of work to the underpinnings and architecture powering the management console.

So that GoGrid customers are aware of these changes and updates, I’ve summarized the most notable ones within this article.

Pre-Populated IP List Dropdown

In the previous version of the management console, when you were creating a new cloud server, you needed to start typing the IP address you wanted assigned to your server for the list to begin populating.

old-ip-dropdown

Now, when you create a new cloud server, all the available IP addresses in your account will be pre-populated into a dropdown. Remember: GoGrid provides a free, contiguous block of static IP addresses for your server.

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How to Predict Elastic Cloud Computing Costs for Your Organization

Tuesday, March 6th, 2012 by

Every day I talk with customers about the benefits of cloud computing—everything from faster provisioning of resources, to reduced management overhead, to flexible workload management. The benefits are becoming well-known; however, when it comes to managing an IT budget, these benefits can also present a challenge. Unlike virtual compute, network, and storage resources, budgets aren’t elastic. Your company’s CFO doesn’t want to see that your nimble IT organization is spending $100 today and $1,000 tomorrow. He doesn’t care that you’ve matched IT resources to your customer’s demand curve. No my friend, what your CFO wants is predictability. Fortunately for you, that’s a challenge we’ve solved with our improved plan pricing for cloud servers.

To demonstrate how this new plan works, let’s build a simple model where your usage changes from one month to the next. In month 1, you need three servers for 400 hours, one server for 80 hours, and two servers for the entire month. For simplicity’s sake, we’ll assume all servers are 1 GB and 1 core. Using Pay-As-You-Go pricing, this configuration of servers on GoGrid would cost you $0.12 for each hour an individual server is running. The math for the first month’s configuration looks like this:

3 X 1 GB server x 400 hours = 1,200 hours used
1 x 1 GB server x 80 hours = 80 hours used
2 x 1 GB server x 730 hours = 1,460 hours used

The total hours used for all servers = 2,740 hours at a rate of $.12 per hour.

Total Pay-As-You-Go cost for month 1 = $328.80.

PayAsYouGo-Cloud

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How To Optimize Your Database Backups and Text File Compression with pbzip2 and pigz

Thursday, February 9th, 2012 by

Recently, GoGrid was examining performance enhancements on several internal processes; among these enhancements was switching from standard gzip to “pigz”. Since I had never heard of this “pigz”, I was intrigued by this supposed “parallel” implementation of gzip; meaning it uses all available CPU’s/cores unlike gzip. This prompted me to ask, “I wonder if there is a parallel implementation of bzip2 as well”, and there began my endeavor.

pigz and pbzip2 are multi-threaded (SMP) implementations of their respective idol file compressors. They are both actively maintained and are fully compatible with all current bzip2 and gzip archives.

If you’re like me, you might’ve stayed away from using gzip or bzip2 due to the single-threaded aspect. If I try to compress a, let’s say, 2GB file, the system becomes rather sluggish; the reason being is that the “compression tool of choice” uses almost all of 1 core of today’s multi-core, multi-CPU systems and creates an uneven load between the cores, causing the CPU to operate very inefficiently.

In this example I have a .tar file with several databases in it, which totals 1.3GB. The system in question is a GoGrid dedicated server with 8 cores. The server’s load is around 1 and is a production database server.

Using bzip2, the file took approximately 6 minutes and 30 seconds to compress. Yikes!

bzip2

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Riverbed Stingray 8.1 Now in the GoGrid Cloud!

Tuesday, February 7th, 2012 by

As of today, GoGrid has released multiple images of the leading software load balancer, Riverbed Stingray! The following images are available on the GoGrid Partner Exchange in both San Francisco and Amsterdam:

  • Riverbed 7.4 Simple Load Balancer 10 Mbps
  • Riverbed 8.1 Load Balancer 10 Mbps
  • Riverbed 8.1 Load Balancer 200 Mbps
  • Riverbed 8.1 Load Balancer 200 Mbps WAF

How to Monitor Your Windows 2008 Server on GoGrid with Cacti 0.8.7g

Tuesday, June 14th, 2011 by

This is the 3rd and final post in my setup and use of the GoGrid Community GSI server for Cacti Monitoring. In my first post, “Set Up A Cacti Monitoring Server in Minutes with this GoGrid Community Server Image,,” I covered how to deploy Cacti in your GoGrid environment using a Community GSI. My second post, “How to Monitor Your Ubuntu Server on GoGrid in 6 Steps Using Cacti 0.8.7g,” I discussed how to initiate monitoring of your GoGrid Ubuntu server. Now to round things off, I want to show you how to link up your Cacti monitoring server to a Windows Server 2008 server on your GoGrid network. The base install of Cacti 0.8.7g will allow you to monitor the server’s bandwidth utilization, Ethernet errors, number of logged in users, and total number of processes. There are other templates available to monitor other components and services on your Windows server, but they require using an additional SNMP service beyond the Microsoft SNMP service. My blog post won’t get into the latter, but I will cover the former.

Objectives:

  1. Configure GoGrid private network connectivity on Windows 2008 Server and test connectivity to Cacti server
  2. Configure and start Microsoft SNMP service on your Windows 2008 Server
  3. Add new Cacti device
  4. Create graphs to log Local Connection and Local Connection 2 bandwidth and errors, Logged in Users, and server processes

Configure GoGrid private network connectivity on Windows 2008 Server and test connectivity to Cacti server

Below we see that we have a server (“Web2”) deployed on GoGrid with a public IP. Let’s log into this server and configure the private network with a private IP from the same subnet of the Cacti Monitor server. As I described in my previous post – I am using the prescribed private IP subnet from my GoGrid portal, contained under the List tab and then under Network – Private Network.

Selection_101

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