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Archive for the ‘Datacenter’ Category

 

Moving past data centers: Public cloud storage

Monday, June 2nd, 2014 by

Managing data volume and storage using an in-house data center isn’t necessarily the cheapest endeavor. Between equipment maintenance and variable energy costs, obtaining information from these stores is pretty expensive and can weigh heavily on any IT department with less than a dozen people.

Data center employee works with a server.

Data center employee works with a server.

Scrutinizing categories
To reduce overhead costs, many organizations are choosing to invest in cloud storage, which allows companies to access intelligence more fluidly. According to IBM Systems magazine, there are three main categories of data enterprises handle on a regular basis:

1. Hot – information that’s needed most frequently and requires faster access
2. Warm – information that viewed fairly often and is stored on slightly slower storage
3. Cold – information that’s rarely accessed and can be stored on the slowest units

Traditionally, organizations have to factor in rack space, power supply energy requirements, redundancy, and recovery capabilities when prioritizing data center tasks. Certain algorithms are used to allocate workloads between servers to deliver higher performance. Each data category requires a different protocol and set of rules so that tasks can be managed efficiently.

Ascending into the cloud 
HostReview contributor Steve Jen noted that migrating data storage responsibilities to cloud servers eliminates much of the tediousness associated with in-house access and data processing. There are a few key reasons companies have decided to make this transition, the main one being a significant reduction in expenses. By moving to the cloud, IT departments can also realize other advantages such as eliminating the need to invest in tangible infrastructure like hard disks and cooling units or constantly maintaining those assets. By eliminating such administrative tasks, IT professionals can dedicate more time, energy, and resources to implementing business-changing applications, improving processes, and focusing on value-added services.

One of the most popular features of cloud computing is that it enables employees to access information when not in the office. This capability helps enterprises keep up with an increasingly mobile workforce, freeing staff from physical location and allowing them to build and maintain customer relationships on a more flexible schedule. In addition to viewing files from a home office, employees can store, collaborate, and synchronize documents and other data in near-real-time.

(more…) «Moving past data centers: Public cloud storage»

Connect from Anywhere to the Cloud

Thursday, August 29th, 2013 by

Bay Bridge in the dusk

The cloud is an important part of many companies’ IT strategies. However, there are many companies that have already made a large investment in infrastructure in their data centers. How can they take advantage of all the cloud has to offer without abandoning their investment? The answer is Cloud Bridge – private, dedicated access to the GoGrid cloud from anywhere.

Connecting to the Cloud

Cloud Bridge is your access point into the GoGrid cloud. It supports Layer 2 connections from cross-connects within a partner data center or with carrier connections from just about anywhere. Cloud Bridge is designed to be simple –  just select the port speed you prefer: 100 Mbps, 1 Gbps, or 10 Gbps (only in US-East-1). There’s also no long-term commitment required to use Cloud Bridge – pay only for what you use and cancel anytime. Traffic across Cloud Bridge is unmetered, so you only pay for access to the port. You also have the option of selecting a redundant setup: Purchase two ports in a redundant configuration and you’ll get an aggregate link. Not only will your traffic have physical redundancy, but you’ll also get all the speed available to both ports (for example, 2 Gbps of bandwidth with redundant 1-Gbps ports selected). You can access Cloud Bridge from equipment that you have in GoGrid’s Co-Location Service, a partner data center (like Equinix via a cross-connect), or from your data center using one of your carriers or with one of our partner resellers.

Why Cloud Bridge

Customers that want to use Cloud Bridge are typically looking to solve the following use cases: (more…) «Connect from Anywhere to the Cloud»

Geographic Load Balancing and Disaster Recovery Best Practices for Global Websites

Wednesday, August 21st, 2013 by

Technological World

If you’re running a global website, you’ll want to reduce the latency for customers around the world. GoGrid offers the global infrastructure and robust network to support this setup. With Geographic Load Balancing, GoGrid can also improve performance to your website from around the world. Here are recommended best practices for building a reliable, high-performing global website.

Deploying the Correct Infrastructure Setup

Global websites still require local infrastructure to be truly effective in reducing latency. GoGrid has data centers around the world where you can deploy infrastructure to better serve your customers. Deploy infrastructure to the Western United States (in our US-West-1 data center), Eastern United States (in US-East-1) and Europe (EU-West-1). Although your specific configuration is unique to your setup, you’ll most likely have database and webservers in each of these data centers.

In addition, you’ll want to keep your servers in-sync. One option between US-West-1 and US-East-1 is to use Cloud Link, a dedicated, private line between our data centers. This connectivity makes synching your servers secure and easy. Once you have your back end in place, you’ll want to configure your front end.

Geographic Load Balancing

(more…) «Geographic Load Balancing and Disaster Recovery Best Practices for Global Websites»

Cloud Migration: Whatever You Do, Have a Plan

Tuesday, May 7th, 2013 by

Every company adopting public cloud computing as part of its IT service delivery strategy is faced with the decision of which applications to migrate to the cloud and how. Some common cloud migration options we discuss with customers include:

  • Migrating to a Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) provider
  • Rebuilding an existing application in the cloud
  • Migrating an existing application “as is” to the cloud

Determining the right option depends on your business objectives and the application itself. Each option has benefits and drawbacks, but a business will often decide on an approach without adequately researching a comprehensive migration strategy. And without ample planning and consideration, the cost and complexity of migrating these applications can lead to delayed cloud projects that are over budget.

Cloud Migration - have a plan

Migrating to SaaS

For a new business looking for application services at a low up-front cost, a SaaS application is often a “no brainer.” However, when a business decides to migrate from an existing on-premise application to a new SaaS application, things get more complicated. There are data migrations to consider, transition time and labor, lost customizations, training, and “sunk costs” that can’t be recovered to factor in. Many SaaS vendors offer tools and services to help customers migrate data from legacy applications to the new SaaS application, but it’s important to research the migration process thoroughly before making a purchasing decision, especially if you’ve invested a lot of time in customizations or IT service integration.

Depending on the application and the availability of migration tools to assist in the migration, these factors can offset some of the gains of SaaS. Plus, the business risks additional time and expense if unforeseen migration challenges arise along the way. Businesses considering moving to SaaS should also consider what I call “SaaS in a box” or “SaaS-lite” applications. These applications are typically offered by vendors as part of a partner program or ecosystem like the GoGrid Exchange and deliver some SaaS benefits with more customer control. These templates can also be used to simplify the migration of an existing on-premise application to the cloud. (more…) «Cloud Migration: Whatever You Do, Have a Plan»

The Top 3 Private Networking Use Cases for CloudLink

Tuesday, April 2nd, 2013 by

Public clouds are fantastic for a majority of infrastructure use cases. And interconnectivity between clouds enables myriad solutions to empower businesses to have multiple synchronized points of presence across the world. Companies can easily set up connections that traverse the public Internet as a means to transmit and potentially synchronize data between cloud data centers. But these connections need to be reliable and more often than not, private.

CloudLink private network between cloud data centers

CloudLink private network between cloud data centers

With public network connections between clouds, users are at the mercy of hops and latency. For example, data may take one route with a particular number of hops, and a second later, may follow a completely different path and take a longer or shorter amount of time based on the connection.

In terms of securing the transport, some companies rely on point-to-point VPN connections using a hardware or software solution or some combination of the two. However, these solutions are also constrained by the connection and have limited speeds.

There are some scenarios or use cases that warrant using dedicated private networking to join geographically dispersed clouds. This is where GoGrid’s CloudLink service comes into play.

GoGrid’s CloudLink is a data center interconnect product—a redundant 10 Gbps pipe that is isolated to GoGrid traffic only. CloudLink enables private network traffic between different servers in GoGrid’s US data centers. As part of our “Complex Infrastructure Made Easy” mission, we designed this service to be basic yet powerful and still meet the needs of demanding organizations. Because this is a private network, much like the private network within GoGrid’s standard cloud infrastructure, there are no bandwidth costs. You simply decide on the connection speed (10 Mbps, 100 Mbps, or 1 Gbps), configure your connection, and pay for just the dedicated connection. (more…) «The Top 3 Private Networking Use Cases for CloudLink»