Archive for the ‘Customer’ Category

 

GoGrid Success Story: ScribbleLive and Apple iPhone 3G Keynote

Monday, June 9th, 2008 by

Today the Internet was abuzz with the latest Steve Jobs’ Keynote address at the Apple World Wide Developers Conference, so much so that Twitter was brought to its knees and other blogging sites were overwhelmed with repeated traffic requests. I watch the action on a variety of sources (pictures and text from Engadget and Audio being streamed through uStream). It was a bit painful having to manual refresh or have audio drop during the keynote speech, but the announcements were eventually heard world-wide.

scribblelive_logo

This post is not about the iPhone though but rather about a new GoGrid customer who was recently written up on TechCrunch, ScribbleLive. ScribbleLive is an Ajax-based, Live Blogging platform that enables authors to cover live events in a real-time manner. Billed as a “media rich conference call” ScribbleLive provides audiences an immersive experience on browsers and mobile devices alike, pushing text, links, pictures and videos instantly without the need to constantly reload the browser page.

What makes this story noteworthy is that ScribbleLive is a true, bootstrapped startup. The company, founded by Jonathan Keebler and Michael De Monte, was put together for about $1500. They are only 2 employees but have set up an infrastructure of a well-established company, with GoGrid powering their Application and Database servers and Akamai providing the CDN (content delivery network).

During the WWDC event, they ran their own “System Status” LiveBlog to keep users up to date on the systems powering other users live-blogging. Some highlights:

  • The day before the event they were getting 181,000+ page views
  • Throughput before, during and after the event ranged between 1.3 to 4.6 Mbits/sec
  • Front-end servers maintained 2% CPU utilization
  • Database server peaked at 7% CPU utilization
  • 1.5 hours before the event, 1+ unique visitors/sec were accessing the site

(more…) «GoGrid Success Story: ScribbleLive and Apple iPhone 3G Keynote»

Quick Roundup of a few GoGrid Reviews

Tuesday, May 20th, 2008 by

GoGrid is starting to get some traction around the world. Many users are seeing how “controlling the cloud” is becoming the clear way to go when choosing a cloud hosting solution. Obviously, Amazon EC2 is pushing hard to be the leader and GoGrid is biting at their heels. In many cases, GoGrid actually offers a better service than many of the other cloud computing companies out there with offerings like:

  • Free F5 load balancing
  • Persistent servers
  • Linux AND Windows server images with full root or administrator access
  • Static IPs
  • Meter pricing
  • Facebook QuickStart Servers
  • Free Support

But don’t just take my word for it. Here are what others have to say:

bub.blicio.us

Bub.blicio.us

I guess you can think of GoGrid as Web 2.0 meets cloud computing with traditional hosting thrown in for a complete solution. If you’re a Facebook developer, give it a shot, it just might save you time and money while helping you start building your user-base, today.

(more…) «Quick Roundup of a few GoGrid Reviews»

Come See GoGrid at StartUp SF – new SF meetup on April 30th

Tuesday, April 29th, 2008 by

If you are in the San Francisco Bay Area tomorrow (April 30th) we hope that you can attend StartUp SF, a meetup designed to help you “kickstart your startup.”

StartUp_SF_Logo_150w

Speaker and Demo tables

Jonathan Cobb – Founder/CTO of Kiptronic (http://www.kiptronic.com)

Topic – “Genesis of a Startup: from Concept to Company”

  • Early Validation — Before you start in earnest, you might wonder — What makes a good idea? Is yours worth pursuing? How do you size your opportunity?
  • Covering the Basics — A handful of best-practices recommendations for general company administration: corporate formation, capital structure, legal, accounting, etc.
  • Building the Core Team — How do you attract talent at this very early stage? What kinds of players will you need pre-funding? Post-funding?
  • Market Validation — How do you execute to prove you have a winning idea? What milestones make sense for your business?
  • Fund Raising — When should you raise money? Who should be your target funding sources? How much should you raise? What are common investment terms?

Demo table companies: Triggit, Askpedia and MotivePath. Also come see a demo of GoGrid, a definite “must have” for any startup.

(more…) «Come See GoGrid at StartUp SF – new SF meetup on April 30th»

"Your GoGrid is all False Advertising!"

Friday, March 28th, 2008 by

quotable This note was sent to us by a new GoGrid user (Hareem Haque) and frankly it scared us. But then we read on further in the note:

“Honestly speaking. Your GoGrid is all false advertising. It does a whole lot more then what is stated on the site. I ran a CentOS 4.4 server yesterday for a brief but crucial period. The unit itself gave me no headaches. I simply installed all my apps. And off we were testing the app with our clients. Everything worked fine and flawlessly. Thanks to the load balancer we did some load tests. And I could not find anything bad about GoGrid. I am going to start moving my EC2 instance applications over to GoGrid. “

Hareem, who works in Telecommunications in Canada, currently has 4 Amazon Machine Images (AMI’s) running on Amazon’s EC2 (all clones) running as a clustered FTP server and is now in the process of replicating this environment on GoGrid. He set up a CentOS 4.4 server on GoGrid and installed vsftpd on it and ran some tests of 10 – 20MB Flash Video Files (.flv) , moving then to 2 – 100MB Window Media Video (.wmv) files and finally 1 – 1GB MPEG-4 (.mp4) file. He got a throughput of 10mbps with GoGrid and only 7mbps with EC2. With these solid benchmarks, he’s moving forward with more GoGrid servers now.

He also said he was extremely happy that there was no charge for the load-balancing and that it “came in handy.”

(more…) «"Your GoGrid is all False Advertising!"»

Understanding “Clouded” Computing Terms (revised)

Tuesday, February 5th, 2008 by

Author’s Note: This post was revised on 6/23/08. The nature of computing is under going a revolution and rather than fully remove this post, I elected to refresh it so as to provide a better framework for readers.

There seems to be a lot of debate around different types of Computing Terms being used to describe server and hosting solutions. In fact, in the past, the blogosphere seemed to throw around terms like Grid, Cloud, Utility, Distributed and Cluster computing almost interchangeably. But, as of this revision, one term is rising to the top: Cloud Computing. (See recent trend analysis here.)

The definitions vary from source to source, author to author. While I cannot (and will not) attempt to articulate the end-all definition, I can write about how I view these terms and how they apply to the products that we offer, namely GoGrid. But before I dive into MY interpretation, providing what others view on these subjects may shed some light on our framework.

Terms as defined by Wikipedia

wikipedia_logo_sm Many people view Wikipedia as an authoritative source of information but that is always subject to debate. Wikipedia defines some of these terms as follows (not the end-all definitions though) and I have taken some liberties of removing non-relevant information for argument’s sake:

  • Grid Computinghttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grid_computing
    • Multiple independent computing clusters which act like a “grid” because they are composed of resource nodes not located within a single administrative domain. (formal)
    • Offering online computation or storage as a metered commercial service, known as utility computing, computing on demand, or cloud computing.
    • The creation of a “virtual supercomputer” by using spare computing resources within an organization.

    (more…) «Understanding “Clouded” Computing Terms (revised)»