Archive for the ‘Cloud Server’ Category

 

Big Data Cloud Servers for Hadoop

Monday, January 13th, 2014 by

GoGrid just launched Raw Disk Cloud Servers, the perfect choice for your Hadoop data node. These purpose-built Cloud Servers run on a redundant 10-Gbps network fabric on the latest Intel Ivy Bridge processors. What sets these servers apart, however, is the massive amount of raw storage in JBOD (Just  a Bunch of Disks) configuration. You can deploy up to 45 x 4 TB SAS disks on 1 Cloud Server.

These servers are designed to serve as Hadoop data nodes, which are typically deployed in a JBOD configuration. This setup maximizes available storage space on the server and also aids in performance. There are roughly 2 cores allocated per spindle, giving these servers additional MapReduce processing power. In addition, these disks aren’t a virtual allocation from a larger device. Each volume is actually a dedicated, physical 4 TB hard drive, so you get the full drive per volume with no initial write penalty.

Hadoop in the cloud

Most Hadoop distributions call for a name node supporting several data nodes. GoGrid offers a variety of SSD Cloud Servers that would be perfect for the Hadoop name node. Because they are also on the same 10-Gbps high-performance fabric as the Raw Disk Cloud Servers, SSD servers provide low latency private connectivity to your data nodes. I recommend using at least the X-Large SSD Cloud Server (16 GB RAM), although you may need a larger server, depending on the size of your Hadoop cluster. Because Hadoop stores metadata in memory, you’ll want more RAM if you have a lot of files to process. You can use any size Raw Disk Cloud Server, but you’ll want to deploy at least 3. Also, each Raw Disk Cloud Server has a different allocation of raw disks, which are illustrated in the table below. The Cloud Server in the illustration is the smallest size that has multiple disks per Cloud Server. Hadoop defaults to a replication factor of three, so to protect your data from failure, you’ll want to have at least 3 data nodes to distribute data. Although Hadoop attempts to replica data to different racks, there’s no guarantee that your Cloud Servers will be on different racks.

Note that the example below is for illustrative purposes only and is not representative of a typical Hadoop cluster; for example, most Cloudera and Hortonworks sizing guides start at 8 nodes. These configurations can differ greatly depending on if you intend to use the cluster for development, production, or production with HBase added. This includes the RAM and disk sizes (less of both for development, most likely more for HBase). Plus, if you’re thinking of using these nodes for production, you should consider adding a second name node.

Hadoop-cluster (more…) «Big Data Cloud Servers for Hadoop»

Get Your Game On in the Cloud

Tuesday, June 11th, 2013 by

Do you play mobile games on your smartphone or tablet? What about on your computer? And do you still put in a CD or DVD to play them? Or do you download an app to play? Have you ever tried an online game within Facebook? And what about on your game console? As bandwidth has increased and technology has evolved, more and more of these gaming experiences are being served from the cloud. Online gaming has transcended physical media like CDs, DVDs, and installed applications and moved to virtual environments based on Flash, HTML5, or other streamed or in-browser technologies.

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According to investment bank Digi-Capital, mobile games account for 42 percent of all new game investments. If money trails are any indication of success, we should watch to see where the banks are investing. In December 2012, Forbes reported that US video game sales dropped 25 percent in the month of October 2012, falling from $1 billion to $775.5 million. Conversely, general spending on mobile and social games rose 7 percent to $7.24 billion in 2011…and that was a few years ago!

Just take a look at some of the games listed in this .NET article, “The top 10 HTML5 games of 2012.” It’s very impressive that the underlying technology is completely browser-based and that these games are absolutely interactive and full-featured. Just for fun, I decided to see how many of these HTML5 games are cloud-hosted. (Remember though, because HTML5 is in-browser code, it doesn’t matter that much if it is cloud or traditionally hosted.) Here’s what I discovered:

  • “A Grain of Truth” – shared hosting
  • “Dune 2 Online” – colocation
  • “Cut the Rope” – cloud/dedicated/custom hosting
  • “Hex GL” – shared/dedicated hosting
  • “Lux Ahoy” – cloud/dedicated hosting
  • “D.E.M.O.” – cloud hosting
  • “BananaBread” – telco hosting
  • “Save the Day” – cloud hosting
  • “Bombermine” – shared hosting
  • “BrowserQuest” – ISP/VPS/Web hosting

As you can see, there’s quite a mixture of hosting provider types, ranging from shared to large-scale ISP/telco to cloud. The physical requirements for these types of HTML5 games rely mainly on the end user and the capabilities of the specific device. However, if any of these HTML5 games were to take off in popularity, the game owner would need to scale its infrastructure to handle the increased demand.

(more…) «Get Your Game On in the Cloud»

How Software Defined Networking Delivers Next-Generation Success

Wednesday, June 5th, 2013 by

Software defined networking (SDN) is today where the cloud was a few years ago, and their paths are quite similar. As cloud providers innovate, they incorporate new, cutting-edge technology to let users do more with their architectures and enable solutions that were previously impossible. Just as the cloud moved people away from physical boxes and bare metal devices, SDN is allowing developers and architects to divorce themselves from proprietary hardware appliances like load balancers and firewalls.

So, what are the similarities between SDN and cloud? How about abstraction or the movement from physical to virtual?

To get a bit more scientific, I jumped over to Google Trends (which looks at search term volume over time) and did a search for “cloud,” “SDN,” “cloud computing,” and “software defined networking.”

cloud-sdn-trends

The results shown here make it pretty obvious that “cloud” continues to grow and overshadow the other terms. Removing “cloud” shows “SDN” making the same upward trajectory as “cloud” does in the graphic below. (Because people have been shortening the term “cloud computing” to simply “cloud,” it’s logical that the term’s search volume is decreasing.)

snd-cloud-comp-software-defined-network-trends

(more…) «How Software Defined Networking Delivers Next-Generation Success»

Access your servers with GoGrid’s new Console service

Thursday, May 23rd, 2013 by

At GoGrid we are always looking for ways to improve our product and add value for our customers. We have recently released some new services built on our new Software-Defined Networking (SDN) architecture that customers are already adopting: the Dynamic Load Balancer and Firewall Service. We have recently released a Console access feature on our management console for all our customers.

VNC-Lines

The new console service allows customers to directly access their cloud servers through the management console without using a third party client. Customers have been asking for this feature as it allows for emergency access in the case where they have locked themselves out with a bad host firewall configuration or if they need to do further diagnostics. Accessing the service is easy.

  1. First, login to the GoGrid management console.
  2. (more…) «Access your servers with GoGrid’s new Console service»

Cloud Migration: Whatever You Do, Have a Plan

Tuesday, May 7th, 2013 by

Every company adopting public cloud computing as part of its IT service delivery strategy is faced with the decision of which applications to migrate to the cloud and how. Some common cloud migration options we discuss with customers include:

  • Migrating to a Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) provider
  • Rebuilding an existing application in the cloud
  • Migrating an existing application “as is” to the cloud

Determining the right option depends on your business objectives and the application itself. Each option has benefits and drawbacks, but a business will often decide on an approach without adequately researching a comprehensive migration strategy. And without ample planning and consideration, the cost and complexity of migrating these applications can lead to delayed cloud projects that are over budget.

Cloud Migration - have a plan

Migrating to SaaS

For a new business looking for application services at a low up-front cost, a SaaS application is often a “no brainer.” However, when a business decides to migrate from an existing on-premise application to a new SaaS application, things get more complicated. There are data migrations to consider, transition time and labor, lost customizations, training, and “sunk costs” that can’t be recovered to factor in. Many SaaS vendors offer tools and services to help customers migrate data from legacy applications to the new SaaS application, but it’s important to research the migration process thoroughly before making a purchasing decision, especially if you’ve invested a lot of time in customizations or IT service integration.

Depending on the application and the availability of migration tools to assist in the migration, these factors can offset some of the gains of SaaS. Plus, the business risks additional time and expense if unforeseen migration challenges arise along the way. Businesses considering moving to SaaS should also consider what I call “SaaS in a box” or “SaaS-lite” applications. These applications are typically offered by vendors as part of a partner program or ecosystem like the GoGrid Exchange and deliver some SaaS benefits with more customer control. These templates can also be used to simplify the migration of an existing on-premise application to the cloud. (more…) «Cloud Migration: Whatever You Do, Have a Plan»