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Archive for the ‘Cloud Server’ Category

 

High RAM Cloud Servers for Distributed Caching

Tuesday, June 10th, 2014 by

GoGrid has just released High RAM Cloud Servers on our high-performance fabric. These servers are designed to provide a high amount of available RAM that is most commonly required for caching servers. Like our other recent product releases, these servers are all built on our redundant 10-Gbps public and private network.

High RAM Cloud Servers are available in the following configurations:

High RAM RAM Cores SSD Storage
X-Large 16 GB 4 40 GB
2X-Large 32 GB 8 40 GB
4X-Large 64 GB 16 40 GB
8X-Large 128 GB 28 40 GB
16X-Large 256 GB 40 40 GB

 

 

 

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HBase Made Simple

Wednesday, April 30th, 2014 by

GoGrid has just released its 1-Button Deploy™ of HBase, available to all customers in the US-West-1 data center. This technology makes it easy to deploy either a development or production HBase cluster on GoGrid’s high-performance infrastructure. GoGrid’s 1-Button Deploy™ technology combines the capabilities of one of the leading NoSQL databases with our expertise in building high-performance Cloud Servers.

HBase is a scalable, high-performance, open-source database. HBase is often called the Hadoop distributed database – it leverages the Hadoop framework but adds several capabilities such as real-time queries and the ability to organize data into a table-like structure. GoGrid’s 1-Button Deploy™ of HBase takes advantage of our SSD and Raw Disk Cloud Servers while making it easy to deploy a fully configured cluster. GoGrid deploys the latest Hortonworks’ distribution of HBase on Hadoop 2.0. If you’ve ever tried to deploy HBase or Hadoop yourself, you know it can be challenging. GoGrid’s 1-button Deploy™ does all the heavy lifting and applies all the recommended configurations to ensure a smooth path to deployment.

Why GoGrid Cloud Servers?

SSD Cloud Servers have several high-performance characteristics. They all come with attached SSD storage and large available RAM for the high I/O uses common to HBase. The Name Nodes benefit from the large RAM options available on SSD Cloud Servers and the Data Nodes use our Raw Disk Cloud Servers, which are configured as JBOD (Just a Bunch of Disks). This is the recommended disk configuration for Data Nodes, and GoGrid is one of the first providers to offer this configuration in a Cloud Server. Both SSD and Raw Disk Cloud Servers use a redundant 10-Gbps public and private network to ensure you have the maximum bandwidth to transfer your data. Plus, the cloud makes it easy to add more Data Nodes to your cluster as needed. You can use GoGrid’s 1-Button Deploy™ to provision either a 5-server development cluster or an 11-server production cluster with Firewall Service enabled.

Development Environments

The smallest recommended size for a development cluster is 5 servers. Although it’s possible to run HBase on a single server, you won’t be able to test failover or how data is replicated across nodes. You’ll most likely have a small database so you won’t need as much RAM, but will still benefit from SSD storage and a fast network. The Data Nodes use Raw Disk Cloud Servers and are configured with a replication factor of 3.

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Big Data Cloud Servers for Hadoop

Monday, January 13th, 2014 by

GoGrid just launched Raw Disk Cloud Servers, the perfect choice for your Hadoop data node. These purpose-built Cloud Servers run on a redundant 10-Gbps network fabric on the latest Intel Ivy Bridge processors. What sets these servers apart, however, is the massive amount of raw storage in JBOD (Just  a Bunch of Disks) configuration. You can deploy up to 45 x 4 TB SAS disks on 1 Cloud Server.

These servers are designed to serve as Hadoop data nodes, which are typically deployed in a JBOD configuration. This setup maximizes available storage space on the server and also aids in performance. There are roughly 2 cores allocated per spindle, giving these servers additional MapReduce processing power. In addition, these disks aren’t a virtual allocation from a larger device. Each volume is actually a dedicated, physical 4 TB hard drive, so you get the full drive per volume with no initial write penalty.

Hadoop in the cloud

Most Hadoop distributions call for a name node supporting several data nodes. GoGrid offers a variety of SSD Cloud Servers that would be perfect for the Hadoop name node. Because they are also on the same 10-Gbps high-performance fabric as the Raw Disk Cloud Servers, SSD servers provide low latency private connectivity to your data nodes. I recommend using at least the X-Large SSD Cloud Server (16 GB RAM), although you may need a larger server, depending on the size of your Hadoop cluster. Because Hadoop stores metadata in memory, you’ll want more RAM if you have a lot of files to process. You can use any size Raw Disk Cloud Server, but you’ll want to deploy at least 3. Also, each Raw Disk Cloud Server has a different allocation of raw disks, which are illustrated in the table below. The Cloud Server in the illustration is the smallest size that has multiple disks per Cloud Server. Hadoop defaults to a replication factor of three, so to protect your data from failure, you’ll want to have at least 3 data nodes to distribute data. Although Hadoop attempts to replica data to different racks, there’s no guarantee that your Cloud Servers will be on different racks.

Note that the example below is for illustrative purposes only and is not representative of a typical Hadoop cluster; for example, most Cloudera and Hortonworks sizing guides start at 8 nodes. These configurations can differ greatly depending on if you intend to use the cluster for development, production, or production with HBase added. This includes the RAM and disk sizes (less of both for development, most likely more for HBase). Plus, if you’re thinking of using these nodes for production, you should consider adding a second name node.

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Get Your Game On in the Cloud

Tuesday, June 11th, 2013 by

Do you play mobile games on your smartphone or tablet? What about on your computer? And do you still put in a CD or DVD to play them? Or do you download an app to play? Have you ever tried an online game within Facebook? And what about on your game console? As bandwidth has increased and technology has evolved, more and more of these gaming experiences are being served from the cloud. Online gaming has transcended physical media like CDs, DVDs, and installed applications and moved to virtual environments based on Flash, HTML5, or other streamed or in-browser technologies.

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According to investment bank Digi-Capital, mobile games account for 42 percent of all new game investments. If money trails are any indication of success, we should watch to see where the banks are investing. In December 2012, Forbes reported that US video game sales dropped 25 percent in the month of October 2012, falling from $1 billion to $775.5 million. Conversely, general spending on mobile and social games rose 7 percent to $7.24 billion in 2011…and that was a few years ago!

Just take a look at some of the games listed in this .NET article, “The top 10 HTML5 games of 2012.” It’s very impressive that the underlying technology is completely browser-based and that these games are absolutely interactive and full-featured. Just for fun, I decided to see how many of these HTML5 games are cloud-hosted. (Remember though, because HTML5 is in-browser code, it doesn’t matter that much if it is cloud or traditionally hosted.) Here’s what I discovered:

  • “A Grain of Truth” – shared hosting
  • “Dune 2 Online” – colocation
  • “Cut the Rope” – cloud/dedicated/custom hosting
  • “Hex GL” – shared/dedicated hosting
  • “Lux Ahoy” – cloud/dedicated hosting
  • “D.E.M.O.” – cloud hosting
  • “BananaBread” – telco hosting
  • “Save the Day” – cloud hosting
  • “Bombermine” – shared hosting
  • “BrowserQuest” – ISP/VPS/Web hosting

As you can see, there’s quite a mixture of hosting provider types, ranging from shared to large-scale ISP/telco to cloud. The physical requirements for these types of HTML5 games rely mainly on the end user and the capabilities of the specific device. However, if any of these HTML5 games were to take off in popularity, the game owner would need to scale its infrastructure to handle the increased demand.

(more…) «Get Your Game On in the Cloud»

How Software Defined Networking Delivers Next-Generation Success

Wednesday, June 5th, 2013 by

Software defined networking (SDN) is today where the cloud was a few years ago, and their paths are quite similar. As cloud providers innovate, they incorporate new, cutting-edge technology to let users do more with their architectures and enable solutions that were previously impossible. Just as the cloud moved people away from physical boxes and bare metal devices, SDN is allowing developers and architects to divorce themselves from proprietary hardware appliances like load balancers and firewalls.

So, what are the similarities between SDN and cloud? How about abstraction or the movement from physical to virtual?

To get a bit more scientific, I jumped over to Google Trends (which looks at search term volume over time) and did a search for “cloud,” “SDN,” “cloud computing,” and “software defined networking.”

cloud-sdn-trends

The results shown here make it pretty obvious that “cloud” continues to grow and overshadow the other terms. Removing “cloud” shows “SDN” making the same upward trajectory as “cloud” does in the graphic below. (Because people have been shortening the term “cloud computing” to simply “cloud,” it’s logical that the term’s search volume is decreasing.)

snd-cloud-comp-software-defined-network-trends

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