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Archive for the ‘Cloud Security’ Category

 

How Big Data Can Affect the Way We Learn

Wednesday, August 13th, 2014 by

There’s no doubt that Big Data and cloud computing have the ability to transform the way we look at our jobs, our social habits, and each other. If recent research is any indication, this trend will continue as the technology begins to weave into the way the next generation is educated. Examples of data-based applications and concepts range from students learning how to read to their college graduation are growing more significant every day and promise to exert an even greater influence in the years to come.

How big data stands to change the way the next generation learns about the world.

Big Data stands to change the way the next generation learns about the world.

Emerging uses of the cloud in education
According to a recent piece from Wall Street Journal contributor Lisa Fleisher, Big Data doesn’t just track how quickly a student is learning and his or her deficiency patterns, but can also direct teachers and publishers toward more effective systems. One of the shining examples of this increasingly common practice is the “Teach to One” program underway in New York City public schools that uses digital data to track how well students are learning math concepts.

“The amount of data collected is expected to swell as more schools use apps and tablets that can collect information down to individual keystrokes, or even how long a student holds a mouse pointer above a certain answer,” the source explained.

The program is also testing effective learning environments for students. Of the data collected, each user is tested in the typical classroom, after a one-to-one teaching session, and after taking a lesson online to determine which setting is best for cognitive development. With data now available on millions of students across the country, there is more insight than ever into what works (or doesn’t work) for today’s students.

Another productive use of cloud hosting that has emerged recently is the crowd-funded Reading Rainbow application, which garnered over $5 million on the Kickstarter platform this past spring. Based on the long-running PBS television series starring LeVar Burton, the app provides reading and teaching resources aimed at children just beginning to read at a low price for elementary schools that struggle with program budgets. Although the software is still in development, the Reading Rainbow educational platform will be deployed primarily on tablets for students and on larger displays for teachers in lieu of a chalkboard.

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Focus on Big Data at Big Telecom Event in Chicago

Friday, June 27th, 2014 by

The Big Telecom Event is an annual summit held by industry publication Light Reading that gathers some of the most important figures in the industry together to discuss progress, problems, and what’s on the horizon as technology continues to develop at a rapid pace. This year’s conference, held at the Sheraton Towers in downtown Chicago, didn’t neglect the massive popularity of Big Data and its emerging uses, which was the main topic of discussion for the panel “The Customer-Driven Telco: Real-Time Analytics, Big Data & CEM.”

The talk was moderated by Heavy Reading Senior Analyst Ari Banerjee and included the following panelists: Adan Pope, the CTO of Business Unit Support Solutions at Ericsson; Amy Millard, the Vice President of Marketing for Support.com; Sid Harshavat, Security Architect for Symantec; and Kevin McGinnis, the Vice President of Development and Operations for Pinsight Media at Sprint.

Focus on cloud infrastructure and organization
Much of what the panel discussed was about using Big Data to its fullest potential – that is, organizing a cloud server and all its data to best serve the customer and the speed at which information can be delivered. Pope suggested that horizontal organization could be a major solution for companies looking to increase accessibility to data for the employees using it because a system with fewer middle levels won’t garble information unnecessarily.

Miller thought another effective way to use the cloud computing technology to its fullest potential was to put a higher emphasis on developing analytics to make sense of large amounts of research-based data much faster to best service a client.

“Organizationally, bringing analytics teams in earlier during development [would be useful],” she commented.

However, Big Data won’t organize itself based on a company’s whim – those involved in the management of data must decide what type of organizational structure makes sense for the needs of its staff before it can be created and used as a cloud infrastructure. CloudTweaks writer Syed Raza commented on the importance of a logical structure for an organization in a recent article.

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Public Cloud Appealing to Those Needing Disaster Recovery

Friday, May 9th, 2014 by

These days, businesses are aggregating an incredible amount of data from a lot of different silos. Whether they’re using the information to create enhanced marketing campaigns, conduct research for product development, or look for a competitive edge in the market, these companies are taking whatever steps are necessary to protect that data. Between data breaches and natural occurrences like severe weather that can cause companies to lose their data, many are moving their disaster recovery initiatives to cloud servers.

A broken disk.

A broken disk.

A practical solution
One of the most popular deployment options, public cloud models offer companies the opportunity to back up their data in encrypted, secure environments that can be accessed whenever it’s convenient. However, businesses are looking to take this capability to the next level. Redmond Channel Partner referenced a study sponsored by Microsoft titled “Cloud Backup and Disaster Recovery Meets Next-Generation Database Demands,” which was conducted between December 2013 and February 2014 by Forrester Consulting.

The research firm polled 209 organizations based in Asia, Europe, and North America, with 62 percent of survey participants consisting of large-scale enterprise IT managers. Many of the businesses reported having mission-critical databases larger than 10 terabytes. Respondents claimed that some of the top reasons for using public cloud computing models for backups included saving money on storage (61 percent) and reducing administration expenses (50 percent).

Forrester noted that a fair number of enterprises often omit encrypting their database backups due to the complexity involved and the possibility of data corruption. A number of participants also acknowledged they neglect to conduct tests regarding their disaster recovery capabilities.

The available opportunities
Despite these drawbacks, Forrester’s study showed that cloud-based backup and disaster recovery (DR) models have matured over the past 4 years. In addition, there’s the option of using a hybrid approach that involves combining on-premise DR solutions with public cloud storage. For example, an enterprise could keep all its data in in-house databases and orchestrate a system that would either duplicate or transfer all data into a cloud storage environment in the event of a problem.

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FBI: Health Care Providers Need to Improve Security

Tuesday, May 6th, 2014 by

There’s no disputing that upon implementing cloud servers, physicians, nurses, and hospital administrators will be able to store and access patient information more easily than before. Although such an approach enables them to develop treatments for specific customers, IT professionals and government officials believe care facilities need to improve their security before progressing to the cloud.

Nurses and doctors accessing information.

Nurses and doctors accessing patient information.

A number of cloud solutions offer expanded data protection; however, the current state of many electronic health records systems is lackluster, at best. Data flowing between hospital PCs and mobile devices opens new avenues — creating an environment hackers could potentially exploit to steal sensitive personal health information.

An official security warning 
According to Reuters, the Federal Bureau of Investigation recently informed health care providers their cyber-security infrastructures were unsatisfactory compared to other industries. Although cyber criminals have been known to attack the retail and financial sectors, they could also use electronic records containing insurance and payment information to gain access to bank accounts, personal addresses, phone numbers, and other data.

Reuters obtained a private notice sent to hospital administrators criticizing their lax network defense programs. Issued earlier this month, the memo did not mention the Healthcare.gov breach, which has been criticized by professionals for numerous security flaws. It further implored recipients to contact the FBI in the event any breaches occurred.

The source stated that criminals typically favor health care information because it takes longer for victims to realize that any intelligence has been stolen. Although they often don’t leverage the information itself, hackers often sell such data on the black market. To deter infiltration attempts, some hospitals have invested in cloud infrastructure featuring applications that encrypt data as it flows through the networks.

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Security Alert: OpenSSL Bug Needs Prompt Attention

Tuesday, April 8th, 2014 by

A major vulnerability with the OpenSSL libraries was announced this morning. According to PCWorld, “The flaw, nicknamed ‘Heartbleed’ is contained in several versions of OpenSSL, a cryptographic library that enables SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) or TLS (Transport Security Layer) encryption. Most websites use either SSL or TLS, which is indicated in browsers with a padlock symbol. The flaw, which was introduced in December 2011, has been fixed in OpenSSL 1.0.1g, which was released on Monday [April 7].”

Heartbleed

We want to ensure all our customers are aware of this vulnerability so those impacted can take appropriate measures. The following description of Heartbleed is from http://heartbleed.com:

“The Heartbleed bug allows anyone on the Internet to read the memory of the systems protected by the vulnerable versions of the OpenSSL software. This compromises the secret keys used to identify the service providers and to encrypt the traffic, the names and passwords of the users and the actual content. This allows attackers to eavesdrop on communications, steal data directly from the services and users and to impersonate services and users.”

GoGrid has already performed an extensive audit of our environment and has determined that none of our customer-supporting sites—including our management console, wiki, and secure signup—is exposed to this vulnerability.

If you are permitting SSL/TLS traffic to your servers, however, a firewall won’t block against this attack. This is a serious vulnerability with the ability to significantly expose your environment. GoGrid recommends you review the National Vulnerability Database CVE-2014-0160 as soon as possible to determine if the OpenSSL vulnerability applies to your organization and then take corrective action based on your specific security policies, if necessary.