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Infographic: Keeping Up (and Standing Out) with Managed Services

Thursday, August 21st, 2014 by

Even if you haven’t yet used managed services in your industry, you’re sure to run into one of the newer offerings that promise to do everything but butter your toast. The reality is that demand for managed services is steadily increasing across all industry verticals. Take, for example, the cloud-based managed services (telephony, conferencing, messaging, and contact centers) developed to support the emerging Unified Communications as a Service (UCaaS) market where telephony providers are already jostling for position. Leading telecom providers like Ericsson are routinely inking managed services deals for maintenance of telecommunications infrastructure that includes both fixed and mobile networks, with the goal of “raising the quality and efficiency of [the customer’s] network.” And former infrastructure-as-a-service provider Rackspace has even announced its decision to exit the IaaS marketplace and focus on its “managed cloud” business as a way to rise above the noise—and the competition.

Why all this attention on managed services? Wikipedia defines managed services as “the practice of outsourcing day-to-day management responsibilities and functions as a strategic method for improving operations and cutting expenses.” Sounds good, right? I mean, what company wouldn’t want to improve operations and reduce costs? But if you take a step back to look at the current trends in managed services shown in the infographic below, it’s clear the advantages go beyond just saving money or becoming more efficient.

GoGrid_ManagedServices_300_F

With so much at stake, how can you find out if managed services could prove to be your secret sauce? The best way to start is by choosing a managed services provider that can capitalize on 4 characteristics of tomorrow’s business landscape:

1. Customization

2. Insight

(more…) «Infographic: Keeping Up (and Standing Out) with Managed Services»

What does “any cloud” orchestration mean for telcos?

Monday, July 28th, 2014 by

Last week, GoGrid announced its “any cloud” orchestration engine service, enabling telcos to deliver complex, on-demand solutions, multi-cloud support, and data sovereignty compliance. We received an overwhelmingly positive response to our pioneering technology and unique approach.

Orchestration-engine-service

But don’t just take our word for it. Check out what Light Reading (the premier publication for the telecom industry) had to say in its story, “GoGrid Puts Cloud at a Touch of a Button.” As reported by Carol Wilson, the article underscores the reasons why orchestration is so attractive to telcos:

“The attraction is taking the complexity out of provisioning applications, and while GoGrid is initially focused on big data apps, this approach can support other kinds of applications as well, says Caroline Chappell, senior analyst with Heavy Reading. Telecom cloud service providers have been trying to develop this capability themselves so they can offer business customers the ability to stand up a whole range of applications in the cloud without individually engineering each one through a complex process, she says.

“Telecom cloud providers can make the provisioning process part of the service they offer, even if the application itself is run by an app partner in a third-party cloud, Chappell notes. That creates the ability for telecom cloud providers to offer a cloud-based “business in a box” type offer that doesn’t require complex provisioning of each individual service.”

Orchestration is key for telcos to quickly and easily increase the variety and number of products they offer. It also keeps them focused on what they do best: selling solutions wrapped with value-added services instead of commodity infrastructure. Click here to learn more about GoGrid’s orchestration and 1-Button Deploy™ solutions.

Security Alert: OpenSSL Bug Needs Prompt Attention

Tuesday, April 8th, 2014 by

A major vulnerability with the OpenSSL libraries was announced this morning. According to PCWorld, “The flaw, nicknamed ‘Heartbleed’ is contained in several versions of OpenSSL, a cryptographic library that enables SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) or TLS (Transport Security Layer) encryption. Most websites use either SSL or TLS, which is indicated in browsers with a padlock symbol. The flaw, which was introduced in December 2011, has been fixed in OpenSSL 1.0.1g, which was released on Monday [April 7].”

Heartbleed

We want to ensure all our customers are aware of this vulnerability so those impacted can take appropriate measures. The following description of Heartbleed is from http://heartbleed.com:

“The Heartbleed bug allows anyone on the Internet to read the memory of the systems protected by the vulnerable versions of the OpenSSL software. This compromises the secret keys used to identify the service providers and to encrypt the traffic, the names and passwords of the users and the actual content. This allows attackers to eavesdrop on communications, steal data directly from the services and users and to impersonate services and users.”

GoGrid has already performed an extensive audit of our environment and has determined that none of our customer-supporting sites—including our management console, wiki, and secure signup—is exposed to this vulnerability.

If you are permitting SSL/TLS traffic to your servers, however, a firewall won’t block against this attack. This is a serious vulnerability with the ability to significantly expose your environment. GoGrid recommends you review the National Vulnerability Database CVE-2014-0160 as soon as possible to determine if the OpenSSL vulnerability applies to your organization and then take corrective action based on your specific security policies, if necessary.

Infographic: 2014 – The Year of Open Source?

Tuesday, April 8th, 2014 by

If you’re a software developer, you’ve probably already used open-source code in some of your projects. Until recently, however, people who aren’t software developers probably thought “open source” referred to a new type of bottled water. But all that’s beginning to change. Now you can find open-source versions of everything from Shakespeare to geospatial tools. In fact, the first laptop built almost entirely on open source hardware just hit the market. In the article announcing the new device, Wired noted that, “Open source hardware is beginning to find its own place in the world, not only among hobbyists but inside big companies such as Facebook.”

GoGrid_OpenSource200_blog

Why now?

Open source technology has moved from experiment to mainstream partly because the concept itself has matured. Companies that used to zealously guard their proprietary software or hardware may now be building some or all of it on open-source code and even giving back to the relevant communities. Plus repositories like GitHub, Bitbucket, and SourceForge make access to open-source code easy.

In its annual “Future of Open Source Survey,” North Bridge Venture Partners summarized 3 reasons support for open source is broadening:

1. Quality: Thanks to strong community support, the quality of open-source offerings has improved dramatically. They now compete with proprietary or commercial equivalents on features–and can usually be deployed more quickly. Goodbye vendor “lock-in.”

(more…) «Infographic: 2014 – The Year of Open Source?»

Infographic: Keep your patient health info secure in the cloud

Wednesday, January 22nd, 2014 by

Maintaining data security in the healthcare sector is hard. Although all businesses worry about securing confidential data, it doesn’t compare to the burden of companies managing personal health information that must comply with the Healthcare Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and other relevant regulations. Unfortunately, the sensitive nature of these assets makes them even more desirable to cybercriminals. The result: Patient health information is being targeted more frequently and more aggressively than ever before. Fortunately, the evolving IT landscape has provided a way to address these threats: proactive security monitoring to identify and mitigate potential risks and encryption to protect the data itself.

Outside attacks are only one aspect of the problem, however: Negligent insiders are also putting their organizations at risk. Studies have shown that roughly 94% of healthcare firms have experienced at least 1 data breach within the past 2 years. Because these incidents cost the industry upwards of $7 billion per year, administrators must proactively seek strategies that cut down the chances of unwanted security problems.

Financial repercussions of a data breach

Due to the regulations governing personal health information, the reputation damage and bottom-line costs of a data breach are often exacerbated by compliance fines. What is more troubling is that these costs are only increasing in frequency and severity. Experts believe that the financial repercussions of data breaches have increased by $400,000 between 2010 and 2012, with more than half of companies losing $500,000 or more in 2012. With the price tag expected to rise 10 percent year-over-year through 2016, businesses must plan ahead to reduce these challenges.

To illustrate the effect of data breaches on healthcare organizations and the magnitude of the response required, we’ve put together the following infographic, “Keep Your Patient Health Info Secure in the Cloud.” Part of our series of 60-second guides, the graphic will show you in only a minute why the cloud is powering new ways to secure some of the most personal information available: details about our health.

GoGrid_HIPAA_Compliance_72_F

(more…) «Infographic: Keep your patient health info secure in the cloud»