Archive for November 9th, 2012

 

hack/reduce – Boston’s location for Big Data Innovation

Friday, November 9th, 2012 by

November 8, 2012 marks an important milestone in the Big Data revolution. With the opening of hack/reduce, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit created to cultivate a community of Big Data experts in Boston, technologists now have a state-of-the-art facility to develop ideas and incubate the next generation of technology innovation. When Fred Lalonde (CEO and founder of Hopper) and I co-founded hack/reduce, our goal was to help young technologists experiment with Big Data, share ideas, and cultivate a community of thought leaders without the burden of raising capital.

hr-logo

We have raised more than $1 million from local venture capital firms and leading global technology providers to aid in the creation of the facility; additionally, we’ve been able to establish partnerships with MIT CSAIL and Harvard, which we believe will turn the tide on where entrepreneurs look to establish roots and nurture their ideas from inception to company formation. hack/reduce also looks to create the next wave of disruptive Big Data companies; consider that Boston has produced some of the hottest Big Data startups. including DataXu, Hadapt, Recorded Future, and Sqrrl. These companies continue to lead in their respective markets and draw Big Data talent from all over the globe to the Boston area.

Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick has been incredibly supportive, not only announcing the Massachusetts Big Data Initiative, but also providing a $50,000 grant for the support of hack/reduce. If you haven’t been to the website (http://www.hackreduce.org) or followed all of our recent activities on Twitter (http://twitter.com/hackreduce), I’d strongly encourage you to do so. There are workshops taking place, the chance to access a 1,000-node cluster, and networking opportunities with others interested in exploring the data tsunami.

hack-reduce

One of the things I’ve been most excited about since starting down this path with Fred has been the overwhelming response we’ve gotten from the local community. The event celebrating the opening of the space is no exception. We’ve received thousands of requests, but only had room for a few hundred. Not to worry: For those of you who weren’t able to attend, November 8 is just the beginning. We’ll continue to update you on our progress and keep you informed of events to come. I look forward to collaborating with all of the entrepreneurs at hack/reduce, each of whom is helping to drive the resurgence of technology leadership in Boston.

(more…) «hack/reduce – Boston’s location for Big Data Innovation»

A cloud is a cloud is a cloud

Friday, November 9th, 2012 by

There is no longer any doubt that the cloud is rapidly gaining momentum in the private sector as companies try to deploy technologies capable of enhancing efficiency without dramatically increasing expenses. While many decision-makers agree that cloud computing yields a number of benefits, the extent of these advantages often corresponds to which model is chosen: public, private or hybrid.

Cost reduction is usually one of the primary drivers for companies that move to the cloud, especially in today’s economic state. However, some cloud models may deliver greater opportunity for savings than others, and decision-makers need to balance the pros and cons of each option, according to a report by Virtual-Strategy Magazine.

A cloud is a cloud is a cloud

“A growing number of organizations worldwide are seeing the value of cloud computing as a way of increasing IT flexibility and lowering in-house infrastructure costs,” said Kyle MacDonald, cloud expert at Canonical, according to the news source. “However, achieving the right blend of security, control and cost efficiency depends on choosing the right public or private infrastructure – or the right balance of both.”

The private cloud
Security is one of the most controversial topics regarding the cloud, as many skeptics are unsure whether the hosted environment can keep confidential resources safe. For this reason, many companies responsible for managing highly sensitive information implement a private cloud structure, as IT departments can keep data and solutions within dedicated servers protected behind a specific firewall, Virtual-Strategy Magazine noted.

Furthermore, private clouds, unlike their public counterparts, only host a single tenant. As a result, decision-makers can customize the environments and even incorporate unique disaster recovery and business continuity strategies.

(more…) «A cloud is a cloud is a cloud»